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This Week's Half Price Art

 Oberfeldwebel Albert Kerscher, commander of 2nd company 511 Heavy Tank Battalion aided by a Panzer IV, two Hetzers, a Kingtiger and a Pak gun, successfully defended against concerted Soviet air and armoured attacks, his action buying valuable time for the evacuation of German wounded from Pilau and scoring his 100th victory in the process.

Kerschers Defence of Neuhauser Forest by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00
Battle of Fontenoy during the war of Austrian Succession. French victory under Marshal Maurice De Saxe over the allies (British, Dutch and German under the Duke of Cumberland) 11th May 1745.  Fontenoy, 5 miles south east of Tournai (Tolnay) the battle which started with a Dutch assault and British and Hanovarian infantry advance against the French centre during the battle a sudden attack by an Irish Brigade under French command, attacked the allied forces. The allied square was broken but the British, Hanovarian and Dutch forces retreated in good order.
Battle of Fontenoy by Horace Vernet (GS)
Half Price! - £240.00
 The chaos of mounted action is perfectly captured as parliament troops engage in the cut and thrust of confused conflict. The observer is drawn into the fight by the closeness of impending pain.

For God and Parliament by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £75.00
DHM1374GL. B Squadron, 1st The Queens Dragoon Guards, Safwan, Iraq, 2003 by David Rowlands.

B Squadron, 1st The Queens Dragoon Guards, Safwan, Iraq, 2003 by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge.  Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death.  With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete.
Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.

Battle of Bannockburn by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £13000.00
The Battle of Hastings: While King Harold II  was defeating the Norse invasion at the battle of Stamford Bridge in the north, the Norman invasion led by the Norman Duke William landed in the south. A Norman force of 7,000 warriors sailed across the English Channel in 450 flat boats and landed at Pevensey in Sussex on September 28th. The following two weeks saw the Norman army organising and raiding the local area for supplies. On hearing of the invasion, King Harold marched south from York to London, a distance of 200 miles, in seven days. And on October 13th with his army of 7,000 men took up position on Senlac Hill, 8 miles north of Hastings. Harold took this position as this was the direct route for London. The following day, the Normans attacked the village (which is now the town of Battle). The Battle of Hastings was a battle between King Harolds infantry and the Norman cavalry and archers. The Saxon line threw back the first charge of Norman knights and as the knights began retiring, the Saxons began to pursue the cavalry but a counter attack by Williams disciplined knights cut down the Saxon infantry. King Harold reformed his line before the second Norman cavalry attack was launched. For many hours King Harolds Saxon infantry held their ground against the repeated cavalry charges, both sides suffered heavy losses. As the evening progressed the battle turned the Normans way, William feigned a withdrawal of his cavalry, the Saxon infantry again could not resist to break ranks and pursue the cavalry. Halfway down the hill Williams knights turned and charged the Saxon infantry. King Harold at this time was mortally wounded from an arrow in the eye and the victory was won by the Normans. Each side lost a quarter of their men and during the fighting William the Conqueror had three horses killed under him. Later he ordered the building of Battle Abbey on the battlefield. The way was clear to London and William the Conqueror was crowned King of England on Christmas day at Westminster Abbey.

Battle of Hastings by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Gunners of Captain W. Johnstons Company, 4th Battalion Royal Artillery, tenaciously defend the Queens Redoubt against the Spanish army.

Seige of Pensicola by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Napoleons farewell to Josephine.
My Destiny and France by Laslett Pott. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
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