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Istabraq by Graham Isom.


Istabraq by Graham Isom.

Graham Isoms beautiful limited edition features Istabraq, one of the greatest horses of the century, on the way to winning the 1999 Smurfit Champion Hurdle at Cheltenham for the second year in succession. As in 1998, Istabraq was ridden by Charlie Swan and was eventually victorious in the biggest race in the National Hunt calendar by just over 3 lengths from a field of fourteen horses which included some of the most formidable names of the 1990s. From left to right, the horses prominently featured are: City Hall, ridden by Robert Thormon; Tiutchev, ridden by Mick Fitzgerald; Mister Morose, ridden by Carl Llewellyn; Bellator, ridden by Norman Williamson; Istabraq, ridden by Charlie Swan and French Holly, ridden by Andrew Thornton. Trained by Aidan OBrien and owned by the great Irish gambler JP McManus, Istabraq revelled in the bright and sunny conditions and on the good to soft ground. His success is a tribute to the work of the young colleague of JP McManus. John Durkan. who selected the horse on the grounds of his great promise but who died tragically frorn leukaemia before Istabraqs greatest triumphs. In his memory, the John Durkan Memorial Fund was founded by a number of his friends in the racing world to raise money to establish a leukaemia research body in Dublin called The Institute of Molecular Medicine. Istabraq, in Arabic, means to run like lightning.
Item Code : LIM0472Istabraq by Graham Isom. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 500 prints.

Image size 23.5 x 15.5 inches (60cm x 40cm)Artist : Graham Isom£130.00

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Artist Details : Graham Isom
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Graham Isom


Graham Isom

Graham Isom is possessed of what has been described by Horse and Hound magazine as a tremendous ability to paint horses in action. Graham Isom was born in 1945, in Kent. and brought up around his fathers riding school. where he first developed his love of horses. He studied at Ravensboune College of Art, where he specialised in sculpture. Having left college, he went through a series of jobs. including working as a groom in a stables on Dartmoor, labouring on a building site and running a shoe shop, and it was not until the late 1960s that he returned to the art world, when he taught sculpture and painting to A-level students in Dorset. After five years as a teacher, his private commissions increased sufficiently to enable bun to devote all his tinie to painting. For two years he specialised in figure studies but he turned freelance in 1973 and was able to concentrate increasingly on equestrian subjects. His commissions have included work for many stables, owners and even for the Officers Mess of the Household Cavalry. A regular award winner, Grahain Isom was decorated by the American Academy of Equine Artists in every year from 1990-1993. In 1993 alone he received a trio ol a,s ards: Best Racing Picture, Best Sporting Picture and Most Popular Picture.

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This Week's Half Price Art

 After the Battle of Roundway Down 13th July 1643, a grief stricken girl meets her true love all too briefly for the last time.

Found and Lost by Chris Collingwood (GL)
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Clash of Steel, Prokhorovka, Kursk, 12th July 1943 by David Pentland. (GS)
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 The battle of Mons was the first major battle fought by the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) The BEF had advanced along a 20 mile front along the Mons canal, and were on there left flank of the French 5th army. But when the French army had been defeated at the Battle of the Sambre on the 22nd August, The British commander Sir John French agreed to hold his position until the morning of the 23rd. The BEF were attacked by the German First Army . The German infantry advance was repelled by the British infantry and sustained very large losses: the British lost 1600 killed or wounded. But with the French forces retreating the British forces had no alternative but to retreat also, and on the morning of the 24th of August they began retreating to the outskirts of Paris over a fourteen day period.

Retreat From Mons by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
Half Price! - £37.00
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Corporal Robert Grant VC and Lt Brown, 5th (Northumberland) Fusiliers Saving Pte Deveney, Returning Towards the Alambach, Lucknow after a reconnaissance 25th Sept. 1857 by David Rowlands. (GS)
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1st Battalion Irish Guards in the Kacanik Defile, Kosovo Operation Agricola by David Rowlands. (GL)
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Private Kenneth Cross, 1st Battalion The Queens Lancashire Regiment Winning the Military Medal Belfast 1973 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Edward departs from his almost completed Rhuddlan Castle at the conclusion of his second Welsh campaign.

Edward the 1st in Wales by David Pentland. (P)
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Cruiser Tanks of 1st Royal Tank Regiment at the Battle of Beda Fomm.  6th February 1941: My friend Lt Col G Vesey Holt RTR has always considered that the deeds of 1 RTR at Beda Fomm have been neglected. To put this right he commissioned me to do a painting which he then presented to his Regiment. He obtained copies of the Regiment's War Diary. I was also greatly assisted by the staff of the Tank Museum, Bovington, which has examples of these tanks on display. On 6th February 1941, a column of Italian tanks and transport vehicles was proceeding southwards along the Benghasi-Tripoli road. In the late afternoon, B squadron engaged the enemy at about 500 yards from a hull down position behind a ridge, while five or six Cruisers of A Squadron crossed the road and proceeded south amongst the Italian column, firing on the transport and guns. It was raining heavily and visibility was poor.  The scene was littered with burning wreckage of Italian M13 tank and lorries. At about 1720 hours visibility became so bad that it was almost impossible to distinguish between friend and foe, and the tanks withdrew to re-group. No British tank was destroyed, though one was left damaged.  A Squadron is indicated by the triangle on the turrets, (red for the senior regiment in the brigade). An A9 is closest, with an A10 beyond. Commanders were almost invariably visible with their hatches open. The pennants on the antenna were a recognition sign, worn at different heights which changed daily. The white circle on a red square was the sign of 7th Armoured Division. The regiment's unit code sign was a white 24 on a red square. At this period British tanks had the multi-coloured diagonally striped pattern of camouflage.  The Cruiser A9 (Mark 1) had one 2-pounder gun and one .303-in. Vickers machine-gun mounted co-axially in the main turret, and one .303-in. Vickers mg in each of the two auxiliary turrets.  The Cruiser A10 (Mark 1A) had one 2-pounder gun and two 7.92-mm Besa machine-guns.

The Battle of Beda Fomm by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
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