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A Welcome at the Inn by Nicolas Trudgian.

A Welcome at the Inn by Nicolas Trudgian.

The USAAF bomber bases of WWII were situated in the heart of rural England. Surrounded by countryside and pretty villages, it took the crews little time to become regulars at the nearest village inn, where traditionally there was Open House to American servicemen. A few convivial hours at the pub after a gruelling mission provided a welcome escape from the rigours of combat flying. Today, 50 years on, most of those local pubs are still there, serving up that unique brand of British hospitality which is so cherished in the memories of the USAAF aircrews. Never was the welcome at the inn more warmly appreciated than on Christmas Eve 1944. General Von Rundstedt had launched a massive offensive in the Ardennes, and the situation was critical. The Eight Air Force was called upon to mount its largest single operation of the war, and on that day over 2000 American bombers climbed into the cold air and headed for the battlefields. After fighting their way through to the target, neutralising enemy airfields, and pounding highways and railtracks, the elated crews headed home only to find the gathering mists wirling around their bases. After landing and debriefing, they were in the modd to party down at the village inn. And they did! A wonderfully nostalgic rendering of B-17s returning over a Suffolk village on that memorable Christmas Eve. His painting will bring back nostalgic memories to thousands of American servicemen who spent Christmas away from home, so long ago.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : DHM2660A Welcome at the Inn by Nicolas Trudgian. - This Edition
PRINT Signed limited edition of 600 prints.

SOLD OUT (August 2009)
Paper size 30 inches x 23 inches (76cm x 58cm) Birdsong, George P
Grim, Vernon L
Myl, James A
Simpson, Robert
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian

Signature(s) value alone : £175
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Other editions of this item : A Welcome at the Inn by Nicolas Trudgian. DHM2660
Limited edition of 60 artist proofs.

Last copy available of this sold out edition.
Paper size 30 inches x 23 inches (76cm x 58cm) Birdsong, George P
Grim, Vernon L
Myl, James A
Simpson, Robert
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian

Signature(s) value alone : £175
£100 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £340.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINT Limited edition of 75 publishers proofs.

Last 4 copies of this sold out edition.
Paper size 30 inches x 23 inches (76cm x 58cm) Birdsong, George P
Grim, Vernon L
Myl, James A
Simpson, Robert
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian

Signature(s) value alone : £175
£125 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £320.00VIEW EDITION...
FLYER Nicolas Trudgian Promotional Flyer. Half A4 Size Double Sheet 6 inches x 8 inches (15m x 21cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£1.50VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :

Extra Details : A Welcome at the Inn by Nicolas Trudgian.
About all editions :

A photogaph of the print :

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
The signature of Captain James A Myl

Captain James A Myl
*Signature Value : £45

Jim Myl joined the USAAF in 1942. Assigned to the 511th B.S., 351st B.G., he flew his first B17 combat mission in June 1944. On 4th August he brought his badly mauled B17 safely home from Berlin, but three days later, returning from Munich, he was hit again. With his aircraft in flames, he and his crew bailed out into the North Sea, six miles from England. He and six survivors were rescued y an RAF Air Sea Search launch. He completed his tour in just 72 operational days, the fastest tour in the 8th Air Force.
The signature of Captain Vernon L Grim

Captain Vernon L Grim
*Signature Value : £45

After joining the service in 1942, Vernon's operational squadron in England was the 407 Sqn, 92nd Bomb Group, based at Poddington, the oldest group in the ETO. Flying the B17 he participated in many of the major raids over Germany, including 4 missions to Berlin, and in the D-Day operations in occupied Europe. Later, losing an engine over Hamburg, he was glad of the help from two P38s who escorted him all the way back to England.
The signature of Colonel George P Birdsong (deceased)

Colonel George P Birdsong (deceased)
*Signature Value : £45

George Birdsong was born on the 12th of October 1919 and raised in Clarksdale MS where he earned a football scholarship at Southwest MS Jr. College. Winning his pilots wings in April, 1942 he was immediately assigned to a B-17 with the 91st BG and sent to Bassingbourn. George Birdsong arrived in England in the fall of 1942, assinged to 323rd Squadron of the 91st Bomber Group "The Ragged Irregulars", where he was one of the first to fly daylight combat missions over Germany. On 4th March 1942, George took part in the famous raid on Hamm, the 91st being the first group to attack a target on the Ruhr. His aircraft - Delta Rebel #2 - made claim to being the first US bomber in World War II to complete 25 combat sorties. George Birdsong remained in the US Air Force experiencing four wars, flying a combat tour in B/17s and B-19s, B-47s, B-52s and B-58s during the Korean and Cold Wars. He was a Wing Commander of the 633rd Special Operations wings, Piciku Airbase in the Central Highlands of Vietnam where he flew A-1 Skyraiders. He survived over 245 combat missions including 220 in Vietnam and his combined military service was 32 years. Sadly Colonel George Purnell Birdsong Jr passed away on the 9th of July 2004 at the age of 84. Colonel Birdsong was buried with full military honors at Arlington Cemetery VA.
The signature of Major Robert Simpson

Major Robert Simpson
*Signature Value : £40

Signing up in June 1941, Robert Simpson served both in Europe and the South Pacific. Initially with the 42nd Sqn, 11th B.G., 7th Air Force in the South Pacific, his first landing in a B17 was on a steel strip in a coconut grove. After participating in the bitter battles of the Solomons and at Guadalcanal, he transferred to Europe joining the 8th Air Force in England for the battle against Germany. During World War Two he flew both the B17 and B24.
The Aircraft :
Flying FortressIn the mid-1930s engineers at Boeing suggested the possibility of designing a modern long-range monoplane bomber to the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1934 the USAAC issued Circular 35-26 that outlined specifications for a new bomber that was to have a minimum payload of 2000 pounds, a cruising speed in excess of 200-MPH, and a range of at least 2000 miles. Boeing produced a prototype at its own expense, the model 299, which first flew in July of 1935. The 299 was a long-range bomber based largely on the Model 247 airliner. The Model 299 had several advanced features including an all-metal wing, an enclosed cockpit, retractable landing gear, a fully enclosed bomb bay with electrically operated doors, and cowled engines. With gun blisters glistening everywhere, a newsman covering the unveiling coined the term Flying Fortress to describe the new aircraft. After a few initial test flights the 299 flew off to Wright Field setting a speed record with an average speed of 232-mph. At Wright Field the 299 bettered its competition in almost all respects. However, an unfortunate crash of the prototype in October of 1935 resulted in the Army awarding its primary production contract to Douglas Aircraft for its DB-1 (B-18.) The Army did order 13 test models of the 299 in January 1936, and designated the new plane the Y1B-17. Early work on the B-17 was plagued by many difficulties, including the crash of the first Y1B-17 on its third flight, and nearly bankrupted the Company. Minor quantities of the B-17B, B-17C, and B-17D variants were built, and about 100 of these aircraft were in service at the time Pearl Harbor was attacked. In fact a number of unarmed B-17s flew into the War at the time of the Japanese attack. The German Blitzkrieg in Europe resulted in accelerated aircraft production in America. The B-17E was the first truly heavily armed variant and made its initial flight in September of 1941. B-17Es cost $298,000 each and more than 500 were delivered. The B-17F and B-17G were the truly mass-produced wartime versions of the Flying Fortress. More than 3,400 B-17Fs and more than 8,600 B-17Gs would be produced. The American daylight strategic bombing campaign against Germany was a major factor in the Allies winning the War in Europe. This campaign was largely flown by B-17 Flying Fortresses (12,677 built) and B-24 Liberators (18,188 built.) The B-17 bases were closer to London than those of the B-24, so B-17s received a disproportionate share of wartime publicity. The first mission in Europe with the B-17 was an Eighth Air Force flight of 12 B-17Es on August 12, 1942. Thousands more missions, with as many as 1000 aircraft on a single mission would follow over the next 2 years, virtually decimating all German war making facilities and plants. The B-17 could take a lot of damage and keep on flying, and it was loved by the crews for bringing them home despite extensive battle damage. Following WW II, B-17s would see some action in Korea, and in the 1948 Israel War. There are only 14 flyable B-17s in operation today and a total of 43 complete airframes
Artist Details : Nicolas Trudgian
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Nicolas Trudgian

Nicolas Trudgian

Cranston Fine Arts have now taken over all remaining stocks of Nicolas Trudgian prints from his previous publishers. We have made available a great many prints that had not been seen for many years, and have uncovered some rarities which lay unnoticed during this transition.

Having graduated from art college, Nicolas Trudgian spent many years as a professional illustrator before turning to a career in fine art painting. His crisp style of realism, attention to detail, compositional skills and bright use of colours, immediately found favour with collectors and demand for his original work soared on both sides of the Atlantic. Today, more than a decade after becoming a fine art painter, Nicolas Trudgian is firmly established within a tiny, elite group of aviation artists whose works are genuinely collected world-wide. When he paints an aircraft you can be sure he has researched it in every detail and when he puts it over a particular airfield, the chances are he has paid it a recent visit. Even when he paints a sunset over a tropical island, or mist hanging over a valley in China, most probably he has seen it with his own eyes. Nick was born and raised in the seafaring city of Plymouth, the port from which the Pilgrim Fathers set sail in 1620, and where Sir Francis Drake played bowls while awaiting the Spanish Armada. Growing up in a house close to the railway station within a busy military city, the harbour always teeming with naval vessels and the skies above resonating with the sounds of naval aircraft, it was not at all surprising the young Nick became fascinated with trains, boats and aircraft. It was from his father, himself a talented artist, that Nick acquired his love of drawing and surrounded by so much that was inspiring, there was never a shortage of ideas for pictures. His talent began to show at an early age and although he did well enough at school, he always spent a disproportionate amount of time drawing. People talked about him becoming a Naval officer or an architect but in 1975 Nick's mind was made up. When he told his careers teacher he wanted to go to art school the man said, 'Now come on, what do you really want to do? After leaving school Nick began a one-year foundation course at the Plymouth College of Art. Now armed with an impressive portfolio containing paintings of jet aircraft, trains, even wildlife, he was immediately accepted at every college he applied to join. He chose a course at the Falmouth College of Art in Cornwall specialising in technical illustration and paintings of machines and vehicles for industry. It was perfect for Nick, and he was to become one of the star pupils. One of the lecturers commented at the time: Every college needs someone with a talent like Nick to raise the standards sky high; he carried all the other students along with him, and created an effect which will last for years to come. Two weeks after leaving art college Nick blew every penny he had on a trip to South Africa to ride the great steam trains across the desert, sketching them at every opportunity. Returning to England, in best traditions of all young artists, he struggled to make a living. Paintings by an unknown artist didn't fetch much despite the painstaking effort and time Nick put into each work, so when the college he had recently left offered him a job as a lecturer, he jumped at the chance. The money was good and he discovered that he really enjoyed teaching. Throughout the 1970s Nick was much involved with a railway preservation society near Plymouth and it was through the railway society that he had his first pictures reproduced as prints. But Nick felt he needed to advance his career and in summer 1985 Nick moved away from Cornwall to join an energetic new design studio in Wiltshire. Here he painted detailed artwork for many major companies including Rolls Royce, General Motors, Volvo Trucks, Alfa Romeo and, to his delight, the aviation and defence industries. He remembers the job as exciting though stressful, often requiring him to work right through the night to meet a client's deadline. Here he learned to be disciplined and fast. Towards the end of the 1980's Nick had the chance to work for the Military Gallery. This was the break that for years he had been striving towards and with typical enthusiasm, flung himself into his new role. After completing a series of aviation posters, including a gigantic painting to commemorate the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Royal Air Force, Nick's first aviation scene to be published as a limited edition was launched by the Military Gallery in 1991. Despite the fact he was unknown in the field, it was an immediate success. Over the past decade Nick has earned a special reputation for giving those who love his work much more than just aircraft in his paintings. He goes to enormous lengths with his backgrounds, filling them with interesting and accurate detail, all designed to help give the aircraft in his paintings a tremendous sense of location and purpose. His landscapes are quite breathtaking and his buildings demonstrate an uncanny knowledge of perspective but it is the hardware in his paintings which are most striking. Whether it is an aircraft, tank, petrol bowser, or tractor, Nick brings it to life with all the inordinate skill of a truly accomplished fine art painter. A prodigious researcher, Nick travels extensively in his constant quest for information and fresh ideas. He has visited India, China, South Africa, South America, the Caribbean and travels regularly to the United States and Canada. He likes nothing better than to be out and about with sketchbook at the ready and if there is an old steam train in the vicinity, well that's a bonus!

More about Nicolas Trudgian

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Return From Leipzig by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
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