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The Last to Fight by Craig Kodera.


The Last to Fight by Craig Kodera.

The Northrop P-61 Black Widow was the first U.S. aircraft designed specifically as a night fighter, and this P-61B was credited with the last two aerial kills of the World War II. Lady in the Dark was the most famous Black Widow of the 548th Night Fighter Squadron. Her nose art included a cat with a flashlight in one hand and a gun in the other, which was the emblem of the 548th, and the lady herself who made quite a striking contrast against the fighters black paint. The P-61B flew its missions after dark, but it was often launched at sunset, a fact I used to my advantage. I wanted to show the aircraft at its best. The colors on the horizon, on the plane, and in the moon make the image majestic and mysterious.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : AX0061The Last to Fight by Craig Kodera. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1000 prints.

SOLD (£180, March 2009)
Image size 27 inches x 18 inches (69cm x 46cm)Artist : Craig KoderaSOLD
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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Black WidowThe P-61 Black Widow built by Northrop was the first operational American military aircraft designed specifically to use the new technology of radar, The Black Widow twin engine, all-metal aircraft was used primarily as a night fighter by the United States Army Air Force squadrons in all theatres of world war two. It replaced earlier British-designed night-fighter aircraft that had been updated to incorporate radar when it became available. The P -61 Black Widow of the 548th NFS aircraft Lady in the Dark on the night of 14th August 1945, was unofficially credited with the last Allied air victory before victory over Japan was declared and the end of world war two.
Artist Details : Craig Kodera
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Craig Kodera

Craig Kodera

Craig Kodera has always loved aviation. Born in Riverside, California, in 1956, he cannot remember a time when airplanes and flight were not part of his life. He was raised in what he calls an aviation family, in a neighborhood close to the Los Angeles Airport. Kodera was quick to pursue his dreams of art and aviation; he started to paint at fourteen, and by the time he was seventeen he had earned his private pilots license. Kodera attended UCLA, where he carried a bachelors degree in mass communications and completed the equivalent of a minor in art history. After graduation, he worked as a commercial artist for several advertising/ design firms, and also for McDonnell Douglas Aircraft. There art and aviation merged, and Craig found himself employed as a production/ design artist and illustrator. Following a year of commercial art, Kodera spent more than seven years in the Air Force Reserve. After completing OTS and flight training, he was assigned to the Air Rescue Service and stationed at March Air Force Base, where he logged over 1300 flying hours in the Lockheed HC-130H Hercules. He also served with the Strategic Air Command, stationed at the same air base, where he flew the McDonnell Douglas KCA0A Extender. Today Kodera is a first officer for American Airlines. He is the charter vice president of the American Society of Aviation Artists, arid he is a member of the Air Force Art Program and the Los Angeles Society of Illustrators. His work hangs in several museums and is part of the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Institutions National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

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This Week's Half Price Art

 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger.

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Wing Commander Roland Beamont in his personal Tempest V, intercepted and downed his first V1 Buzzbomb on the night of June 22nd, 1944, over south east England. As Commander of 150 wing and others he went on to shoot down a total of 30 V1 flying bombs, 8 enemy aircraft and 35 locomotives destroyed plus one minesweeper sunk.
A Buzz for Beamont by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £35.00
 The Suez conflict of 1956 necessitated a large deployment of bombers from the RAF's new fleet of jets.  24 Vickers Valiants and 29 English Electric Canberras operated out of Luqa, together with a further 59 of the type flying from bases in Nicosia and Cyprus under the codename <i>Operation Musketeer</i>.  Adorned in the theatre's black and yellow identification stripes, two XV Sqn Canberras are depicted here on a bombing mission to attack Egyptian airfields in October 1956.  The squadron flew a total of 37 missions during the Suez crisis, its aircraft dropping more bombs than any other Canberra squadron.

Musketeer Canberras by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £1100.00
The last purely British fighter aircraft to be used by the Royal Air Force, the Lightning offered a truly massive performance advantage over existing equipment when it was introduced into squadron service in 1960, achieving level flight speed of around, 1400mph. The prototype known as the P1 had flown in 1954 but production aircraft were not available until 1959, a long gestation period but perhaps understandable with such an advanced machine with many untried, new features. The painting shows an F1A of 111 squadron taking off from its base at Wattisham. The remarque drawing shows an aircraft of 56 squadron Firebirds in 1963 when they were the official RAF aerobatics team for that year. 337 Lightnings were produced, serving with nine squadrons of the Royal Air Force before being supersede by the Phantom and Tornado.
BAC Lightning by Keith Woodcock.
Half Price! - £20.00

 The distinctive black-fuselaged Albatross D.V of Jasta 12s commander taxis out for take off behind the similar machine of Leutnant d R Friedrich Hochstetter at Roucourt, late in 1917. Whilst all of Jasta 12s aircraft possessed black tails, many of them bore their pilots personalised insignia painted large on the fuselage sides. In the case of Hochstetter, it was a stacked shot emblem, whilst others sported castles, diagonal crosses or various geometric shapes. The origin of Schobingers light blue design is unknown, but may have been applied purely for recognition purposes. His final tally was eight victories, while Hochstetter scored just one.

Leutnant d R Viktor Schobinger by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 One of the most unorthodox and daring pilots of World War II, '<i>Warby</i>' Warburton was the only bomber pilot to become an ace, shooting down a Savoia Marchetti SM.79, a Macchi MC.200 and three Cant Z.506Bs, one of which is depicted here being attacked by Warburton's Martin Maryland AR705.

Tribute to Wing Commander Adrian Warburton by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00
 During an amazing spree of balloon-busting during 1918, Willy Coppens gained notoriety over the Western Front for his sheer daring and marksmanship, sending no fewer than 35 observation balloons plummeting to the ground, as well as two aircraft. Here, Coppens despatches a Drachen balloon flying his modified Hanriot HD.1 No23 which he had painted blue because he so disliked the ugly, bad camouflage in which it was delivered. Despite losing a leg whilst downing his final two balloons, Coppens survived the war and lived a full life until his death in December 1986.

Sous-Lieutenant Willy Coppens - Roasting A Sausage by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Schneider CA1 Tanks of the French tenth army spearhead the successful counter offensive against the German army on the river Marne. Overhead a tenacious Junkers JI artillery spotter dogs their tracks. The Second Battle of the Marne, though not an overwhelming victory, spelt the end of German successes on the Western front, and a turning point for the allies.

Tanks on the Marne - France, 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
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