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The Last to Fight by Craig Kodera.


The Last to Fight by Craig Kodera.

The Northrop P-61 Black Widow was the first U.S. aircraft designed specifically as a night fighter, and this P-61B was credited with the last two aerial kills of the World War II. Lady in the Dark was the most famous Black Widow of the 548th Night Fighter Squadron. Her nose art included a cat with a flashlight in one hand and a gun in the other, which was the emblem of the 548th, and the lady herself who made quite a striking contrast against the fighters black paint. The P-61B flew its missions after dark, but it was often launched at sunset, a fact I used to my advantage. I wanted to show the aircraft at its best. The colors on the horizon, on the plane, and in the moon make the image majestic and mysterious.
Item Code : AX0061The Last to Fight by Craig Kodera. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1000 prints.

SOLD (£180, March 2009)
Image size 27 inches x 18 inches (69cm x 46cm)Artist : Craig KoderaSOLD
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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Black WidowThe P-61 Black Widow built by Northrop was the first operational American military aircraft designed specifically to use the new technology of radar, The Black Widow twin engine, all-metal aircraft was used primarily as a night fighter by the United States Army Air Force squadrons in all theatres of world war two. It replaced earlier British-designed night-fighter aircraft that had been updated to incorporate radar when it became available. The P -61 Black Widow of the 548th NFS aircraft Lady in the Dark on the night of 14th August 1945, was unofficially credited with the last Allied air victory before victory over Japan was declared and the end of world war two.
Artist Details : Craig Kodera
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Craig Kodera

Craig Kodera

Craig Kodera has always loved aviation. Born in Riverside, California, in 1956, he cannot remember a time when airplanes and flight were not part of his life. He was raised in what he calls an aviation family, in a neighborhood close to the Los Angeles Airport. Kodera was quick to pursue his dreams of art and aviation; he started to paint at fourteen, and by the time he was seventeen he had earned his private pilots license. Kodera attended UCLA, where he carried a bachelors degree in mass communications and completed the equivalent of a minor in art history. After graduation, he worked as a commercial artist for several advertising/ design firms, and also for McDonnell Douglas Aircraft. There art and aviation merged, and Craig found himself employed as a production/ design artist and illustrator. Following a year of commercial art, Kodera spent more than seven years in the Air Force Reserve. After completing OTS and flight training, he was assigned to the Air Rescue Service and stationed at March Air Force Base, where he logged over 1300 flying hours in the Lockheed HC-130H Hercules. He also served with the Strategic Air Command, stationed at the same air base, where he flew the McDonnell Douglas KCA0A Extender. Today Kodera is a first officer for American Airlines. He is the charter vice president of the American Society of Aviation Artists, arid he is a member of the Air Force Art Program and the Los Angeles Society of Illustrators. His work hangs in several museums and is part of the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Institutions National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

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