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The Last to Fight by Craig Kodera.


The Last to Fight by Craig Kodera.

The Northrop P-61 Black Widow was the first U.S. aircraft designed specifically as a night fighter, and this P-61B was credited with the last two aerial kills of the World War II. Lady in the Dark was the most famous Black Widow of the 548th Night Fighter Squadron. Her nose art included a cat with a flashlight in one hand and a gun in the other, which was the emblem of the 548th, and the lady herself who made quite a striking contrast against the fighters black paint. The P-61B flew its missions after dark, but it was often launched at sunset, a fact I used to my advantage. I wanted to show the aircraft at its best. The colors on the horizon, on the plane, and in the moon make the image majestic and mysterious.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : AX0061The Last to Fight by Craig Kodera. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1000 prints.

SOLD (£180, March 2009)
Image size 27 inches x 18 inches (69cm x 46cm)Artist : Craig KoderaSOLD
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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Black WidowThe P-61 Black Widow built by Northrop was the first operational American military aircraft designed specifically to use the new technology of radar, The Black Widow twin engine, all-metal aircraft was used primarily as a night fighter by the United States Army Air Force squadrons in all theatres of world war two. It replaced earlier British-designed night-fighter aircraft that had been updated to incorporate radar when it became available. The P -61 Black Widow of the 548th NFS aircraft Lady in the Dark on the night of 14th August 1945, was unofficially credited with the last Allied air victory before victory over Japan was declared and the end of world war two.
Artist Details : Craig Kodera
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Craig Kodera

Craig Kodera

Craig Kodera has always loved aviation. Born in Riverside, California, in 1956, he cannot remember a time when airplanes and flight were not part of his life. He was raised in what he calls an aviation family, in a neighborhood close to the Los Angeles Airport. Kodera was quick to pursue his dreams of art and aviation; he started to paint at fourteen, and by the time he was seventeen he had earned his private pilots license. Kodera attended UCLA, where he carried a bachelors degree in mass communications and completed the equivalent of a minor in art history. After graduation, he worked as a commercial artist for several advertising/ design firms, and also for McDonnell Douglas Aircraft. There art and aviation merged, and Craig found himself employed as a production/ design artist and illustrator. Following a year of commercial art, Kodera spent more than seven years in the Air Force Reserve. After completing OTS and flight training, he was assigned to the Air Rescue Service and stationed at March Air Force Base, where he logged over 1300 flying hours in the Lockheed HC-130H Hercules. He also served with the Strategic Air Command, stationed at the same air base, where he flew the McDonnell Douglas KCA0A Extender. Today Kodera is a first officer for American Airlines. He is the charter vice president of the American Society of Aviation Artists, arid he is a member of the Air Force Art Program and the Los Angeles Society of Illustrators. His work hangs in several museums and is part of the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Institutions National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

More about Craig Kodera

This Week's Half Price Art

 One of the most unorthodox and daring pilots of World War II, '<i>Warby</i>' Warburton was the only bomber pilot to become an ace, shooting down a Savoia Marchetti SM.79, a Macchi MC.200 and three Cant Z.506Bs, one of which is depicted here being attacked by Warburton's Martin Maryland AR705.

Tribute to Wing Commander Adrian Warburton by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 A Sea Harrier FRS1 scrambles from HMS Ark Royal in the late 1980s.

Command of the Sea by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 It is August 1944, barely two months since the Allies landed their first troops on the beaches of Normandy. After the failed Operation Luttich (codename given to a German counterattack during the Battle of Normandy, which took place around the American positions near Mortain from 7 August to 13 August, 1944 ) The German Panzer Divisions were in full retreat, The British and American Generals believed it to be critical to halt them before they cauld regroup. Caught in the Gap at Falaise, the battle was to be decisive. Flying throughout a continuous onslaught, rocket-firing Typhoons kept up their attacks on the trapped armoured divisions from dawn to dusk. The effect was devastating: at the end of the ten day battle the 100,000 strong German force was decimated. The battle of the Falaise Pocket marked the closing phase of the Battle of Normandy with a decisive German defeat. It is believed that between 80,000 to 100,000 German troops were caught in the encirclement of which 10,000 to 15,000 were killed, 45,000 to 50,000 taken prisoner, and around 20,000 escaped . Shown here are German Tiger I tanks under continues attack by Royal Aoir Force Typhoons.

Taming the Tiger by Geoff Lea. (Y)
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 The LFG Roland D.VI did not enjoy the success of its contemporaries, the Fokker D.VII and Pfalz D.XII, but was nonetheless a potent and capable fighter. Its unique Klinkerrumpf  fuselage construction made it both lightweight and robust although, despite its qualities, it was not built in large numbers. This particular example, a D.VIa, is shown chasing down a damaged Sopwith Camel  whilst being flown by Gefreiter Jakob Tischner of Jasta 35b. Tischner later wrote off this aircraft in a landing accident when he rolled into a parked Pfalz D.III, destroying both machines.

Gefreiter Jakob Tischner - Roland D.VIa by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 Spitfire Mk.IXs of No.611 Sqn including aircraft FY-F belonging to the Commanding Officer of 611 Squadron, Sqn Ldr Hugo Armstrong, on patrol late in 1942.  Armstrong scored a victory in this aircraft on 2nd November 1942, bringing down an Fw190 for his only victory with this squadron.  With a total of nine victories, he was awarded the DFC in May 1942, and the Bar to the DFC in January 1943, before being shot down and killed over the English Channel in February 1943.

Spitfires of No.611 West Lancashire Squadron by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 Whilst patrolling over advancing Allied troops east of Metemma, three Gloster Gladiators of K Flight, 1 SAAF Sqn, were attacked by Fiat CR.42s from 412a Squadriglia, led by Capitano Antonio Raffi.  All three Gladiators were lost in the action, plus a further two that arrived too late to assist.

Tribute to Capitano Antonio Raffi by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 H.S. Buccaneer SB, of 809 Squadron Fleet Air Arm, takes off from Belfast RAF Sydenham in 1974

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 The afternoon of 25th July 1940 was a desperate one for the already exhausted fighter pilots of the RAF defending the South coast of England.  As convoy CW8 made its way through the English Channel, sixty JU.87 Stukas and forty JU.88 bombers launched a brutal attack on the ships below, backed up by fighter cover of over 50 Messerscmitt Bf.109s.  Eight Spitfires of 64 Sqn (Kenley) were scrambled, together with twelve Spitfires of 54 Sqn (Hornchurch) and Hurricanes of 111 Sqn from Croydon.  The British pilots found themselves massively outnumbered, but nevertheless put up a spirited fight against the teeming enemy.  This painting shows Spitfires of 54 Sqn entering the fray, the pilots scattering as they choose their targets and go after the JU.87s. To the right of this, Bf.109Es of JG.26 are roaring in to join battle, whilst Adolf Gallands aircraft engages a Hurricane of 111 Sqn.

A Day for Heroes by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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