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Military and aviation arist David Pentland.  His entire range of German armour and other military forces are available at great discounted prices direct from The Military Art Company Ivan Berryman is recognised as one of the leading aviation and naval artists, his entire range of prints published by Cranston Fine Arts are available direct from us, including many original aviation paintings.
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Victory Flyover by Robert Taylor.


Victory Flyover by Robert Taylor.

The mass flyover, Toyko Bay, 1945, heralding the surrender on board USS Missouri.
Item Code : AX0033Victory Flyover by Robert Taylor. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 850 prints.

One secondary market print available, numbered 193 / 850. (SOLD - £750, May 2009)
Paper size 32 inches x 24 inches (81cm x 61cm) Walsh, Kenneth A
Swett, James E
Mreymer, John
Lamar, Hi
Nimitz, C W
Blanc, Jeff de
Galer, Bob
Hawkins, Ray
Stewart, Bill
+ Artist : Robert Taylor
SOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
Bill Stewart
*Signature Value : £40



Bob Galer (deceased)
*Signature Value : £35

Robert Galer was born on October 24th 1913 in Seattle, Washington. Robert Galer attended the University of Washington and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in commercial engineering in 1935, at which time he began elimination flight training at the Naval Reserve Aviation Base, Seattle. He went on to become an Aviation Cadet going to Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida for flight training. On 1st July 1936 Galer was commissioned a second lieutenant in the US Mmarine Corps. Bob Galer was one of five USMC pilots to win the Medal of Honor at Guadalcanal. In May 1942, Galer assumed command of Marine Fighting Squadron 224 (VMF-224) and on August 30th, 1942 led the squadron to Guadalcanal as they became part of the Cactus Air Force. It was while in command of VMF-224 that Bob Galer would be credited with 11 confirmed victories and be awarded the Medal of Honor and a rare British DFC. Following the presentation of the Medal of Honor by President Franklin D Roosevelt at the White House on March 24, 1943, Maj. Bob Galer was ordered to Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, to become Assistant Operations Officer. Shortly after advancement to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in November 1943, he was ordered to return to the Hawaiian Islands, where he became Chief of Staff, Marine Air, Hawaiian Area. In March 1952 Colonel Galer went to Korea, where he saw duty as Assistant Chief of Staff, G-4 (Supply), of the 1ST marine Aircraft Wing until the following May. He became Commanding Officer of Marine Aircraft Group 12 (MAG-12), and, for extraordinary achievement on July 11, 1952 was awarded a Gold Star in lieu of a second DFC. Colonel Galer was also awarded the Legion of Merit wiith Combat "V" for his service in Korea. On August 5th, 1952, he was shot down behind enemy lines by anti-aircraft fire while leading a flight of 31 warplanes against targets near the North Korean port city of Wonsan. Colonel Galer was rescued by a helicopter flown by 1st Lt E.J. McCutcheon. Brigadier General Galer died in Dallas, Texas on June 27th, 2005.


The signature of Colonel James E Swett USMC MOH (deceased)

Colonel James E Swett USMC MOH (deceased)
*Signature Value : £40

Jim Swett became one of the top-scoring F4U Aces, with 15.5 victories in 94 missions in the Corsair, but he had already earned himself the Congressional Medal of Honor piloting the F4F Wildcat before switching to the F4U. Leading a four plane section with VMF 221 on April 7, 1942 he shot down no fewer than 7 Japanese Val dive-bombers in an engagement over Tulagi Harbor, before taking a hit himself, and ditching in the sea. In all Jim Swett flew 211 combat missions, 94 in F4U Corsairs, made 120 carrier launches and recoveries, and in addition to his Medal of Honor, was awarded 6 DFCs and 2 Purple Hearts. Sadly, Jim Swett died on 18th January 2009.
CW Nimitz
*Signature Value : £40

Hi Lamar
*Signature Value : £35



Jeff de Blanc (deceased)
*Signature Value : £40

Jefferson De Blanc flew two combat tours in F4Fs and F4Us from Guadalcanal to Okinawa, achieving 9 air victories. He was awarded the Medal of Honor whilst flying an F4F on bomber escort with VMF-112 in 1943. Sadly, he passed away on 23rd November 2007.
John Mremyer
*Signature Value : £35



Lieutenant Colonel Kenneth A Walsh (deceased)
*Signature Value : £50

Ken Walsh was born in Brooklyn, New York, on November 24th 1916. On December 15th 1933, Kenneth Walsh joined the Marines, becoming a mechanic and radioman. In April 1937 he received his wings while still a Private, but was promoted to Corporal immediately after. Ken Walsh achieved an impressive 21 victories in his 104 combat missions. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for two separate actions in August 1943 when, overwhelmingly outnumbered, he destroyed 7 enemy aircraft before being shot down himself. He scored his final victory on 22nd June 1945 over Okinawa. Walsh remained in the Marine Corps for a full career, flying transports in Korea and retiring as a Lieutenant Colonel in February 1962. He was the 4th highest scoring Marine Corps fighter Ace of World War Two. Sadly he passed away on 30th July 1998.
Ray Hawkins
*Signature Value : £30

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
CorsairThe Chance-Vought F4U Corsair was arguably the finest naval aviation fighter of its era. Work on this design dates to 1938 and was headed-up by Voughts Chief Engineer, Rex Biesel. The initial prototype was powered by an 1800-HP Pratt & Whitney double Wasp radial engine. This was the third Vought aircraft to carry the Corsair name. The graceful and highly recognizable gull-wing design of the F4U permitted the aircraft to utilize a 13-foot, three-blade, Hamilton Standard propeller, while not having to lengthen the landing gear. Because of the rigors of carrier landings, this was a very important design consideration. Folding wings were also required for carrier operations. The F4U was thirty feet long, had a wingspan of 41 feet and an empty weight of approximately 7,500 pounds. Another interesting feature was the way the F4Us gear rotated 90 degrees, so it would lay flush within the wing when in the up position. In 1939 the Navy approved the design, and production commenced. The Corsair utilized a new spot welding process on its all aluminum fuselage, giving the aircraft very low drag. To reduce weight, fabric-covered outer wing sections and control surfaces were fitted. In May of 1940 the F4U made its maiden flight. Although a number of small bugs were discovered during early flight tests, the Corsair had exceptional performance characteristics. In October of 1940 the prototype F4U was clocked at 405-MPH in a speed test. The initial production Corsairs received an upgraded 2,000-HP radial giving the bird a top speed of about 425-MPH. The production models also differed from the prototype in having six, wing-mounted, 0.5 caliber machine guns. Another change was a shift of the cockpit about three feet further back in the fuselage. This latter change unfortunately made naval aviators wary of carrier landings with the F4U, due to its limited forward visibility during landings. Other concerns were expressed regarding a severe port wing drop at landing speeds and a tendency of the aircraft to bounce off a carrier deck. As a result, the F4U was initially limited to land-based USMC squadrons. Vought addressed several of these problems, and the Royal Navy deserves credit for perfecting an appropriate landing strategy for the F4U. They found that if the carrier pilot landed the F4U while making a sweeping left turn with the port wing down, that sufficient visibility was available to make a safe landing. With a kill ratio of 11 -to- 1 in WW 11 combat, the F4U proved superior in the air to almost every opposing aircraft it encountered. More than 12,000 F4Us were built and fortunately a few dozen remain in flyable condition to this date.
Artist Details : Robert Taylor
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Robert Taylor


Robert Taylor

The name Robert Taylor has been synonymous with aviation art over a quarter of a century. His paintings of aircraft, more than those of any other artist, have helped popularise a genre which at the start of this remarkable artist's career had little recognition in the world of fine art. When he burst upon the scene in the mid-1970s his vibrant, expansive approach to the subject was a revelation. His paintings immediately caught the imagination of enthusiasts and collectors alike . He became an instant success. As a boy, Robert seemed always to have a pencil in his hand. Aware of his natural gift from an early age, he never considered a career beyond art, and with unwavering focus, set out to achieve his goal. Leaving school at fifteen, he has never worked outside the world of art. After two years at the Bath School of Art he landed a job as an apprentice picture framer with an art gallery in Bath, the city where Robert has lived and worked all his life. Already competent with water-colours the young apprentice took every opportunity to study the works of other artists and, after trying his hand at oils, quickly determined he could paint to the same standard as much of the art it was his job to frame. Soon the gallery was selling his paintings, and the owner, recognising Roberts talent, promoted him to the busy picture-restoring department. Here, he repaired and restored all manner of paintings and drawings, the expertise he developed becoming the foundation of his career as a professional artist. Picture restoration is an exacting skill, requiring the ability to emulate the techniques of other painters so as to render the damaged area of the work undetectable. After a decade of diligent application, Robert became one of the most capable picture restorers outside London. Today he attributes his versatility to the years he spent painstakingly working on the paintings of others artists. After fifteen years at the gallery, by chance he was introduced to Pat Barnard, whose military publishing business happened also to be located in the city of Bath. When offered the chance to become a full-time painter, Robert leapt at the opportunity. Within a few months of becoming a professional artist, he saw his first works in print. Roberts early career was devoted to maritime paintings, and he achieved early success with his prints of naval subjects, one of his admirers being Lord Louis Mountbatten. He exhibited successfully at the Royal Society of Marine Artists in London and soon his popularity attracted the attention of the media. Following a major feature on his work in a leading national daily newspaper he was invited to appear in a BBC Television programme. This led to a string of commissions for the Fleet Air Arm Museum who, understandably, wanted aircraft in their maritime paintings. It was the start of Roberts career as an aviation artist. Fascinated since childhood by the big, powerful machines that man has invented, switching from one type of hardware to another has never troubled him. Being an artist of the old school, Robert tackled the subject of painting aircraft with the same gusto as with his large, action-packed maritime pictures - big compositions supported by powerful and dramatic skies, painted on large canvases. It was a formula new to the aviation art genre, at the time not used to such sweeping canvases, but one that came naturally to an artist whose approach appeared to have origins in an earlier classical period. Roberts aviation paintings are instantly recognisable. He somehow manages to convey all the technical detail of aviation in a traditional and painterly style, reminiscent of the Old Masters. With uncanny ability, he is able to recreate scenes from the past with a carefully rehearsed realism that few other artists ever manage to achieve. This is partly due to his prodigious research but also his attention to detail: Not for him shiny new factory-fresh aircraft looking like museum specimens. His trade mark, flying machines that are battle-scarred, worse for wear, with dings down the fuselage, chips and dents along the leading edges of wings, oil stains trailing from engine cowlings, paintwork faded with dust and grime; his planes are real! Roberts aviation works have drawn crowds in the international arena since the early 1980s. He has exhibited throughout the US and Canada, Australia, Japan and in Europe. His one-man exhibition at the Smithsonians National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC was hailed as the most popular art exhibition ever held there. His paintings hang in many of the worlds great aviation museums, adorn boardrooms, offices and homes, and his limited edition prints are avidly collected all around the world. A family man with strong Christian values, Robert devotes most of what little spare time he has to his home life. Married to Mary for thirty five years, they have five children, all now grown up. Neither fame nor fortune has turned his head. He is the same easy-going, gentle character he was when setting out on his painting career all those years ago, but now with a confidence that comes with the knowledge that he has mastered his profession.

More about Robert Taylor

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