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767 by Michael Rondot.


767 by Michael Rondot.

You can almost hear the Rolls-Royce RB211-524H engines accelerate to full power in this dramatic study by Michael. British Airways 767 Pilots are also qualified to fly the Boeing 757, which is featured in the background of this superb print. They frequently fly a 757 for the first part of the day, and then a 767 for the remainder, or vice versa. In British Airways service, the Boeing 767 is a remarkably versatile aircraft, used on both shorthaul and longhaul routes. West from London Heathrow to Vancouver, on the far West coast of Canada, or East of the City of Madras in India, the 767 effortlessly swallows the miles. Both the 757 and the 767 can perform fully automatic landings in the exterme weather conditions of fog and low cloud, and are cleared to operate dowm to the almost incredible visibility of just 75 metres, when most other aircraft would be grounded. Extended Time Operations, or ETOPS for short, is another familiar operation for both the 757 and 767. The 767 was one of the first twin-engine passenger aircraft allowed to operate on the demanding North Atlantic routes, and has built a strong reputation for being reliable and dependable aircraft.
Item Code : MRX0005767 by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 750 prints.

Last copies of this otherwise sold out edition available.
Paper size 27 inches x 19 inches (69cm x 48cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£110.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : 767 by Michael Rondot. MRX0005
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 75 artist proofs.

Last copies of this otherwise sold out edition available.
Paper size 27 inches x 19 inches (69cm x 48cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£145.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Limited edition of 75 artist proofs. (One print reduced to clear)

Ex display print with border damage mostly at top of border and dents on image which, if the top 2cm was cut off would not be very noticable once framed.
Paper size 27 inches x 19 inches (69cm x 48cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£100 Off!Now : £40.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :



Extra Details : 767 by Michael Rondot.
About all editions :

A photo of the print :

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Boeing 767
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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 On the morning of 21st April 1917, coastal airship No C.17 was on a routine patrol captained by Sub Lieutenant  E G O Jackson, when sometime around 8.00am, she was attacked by German seaplanes and shot down. Such was their vulnerability that these huge battlebags were an easy target for marauding enemy scouts, their single Lewis guns achieving little by way of defence. The Hansa Brandenburg W.12, on the other hand, was a nimble and useful aircraft that the Germans put to good use in the coastal defence role.

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