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Phantom Farewell by Michael Rondot.


Phantom Farewell by Michael Rondot.

Old fighters never die and they dont fade away either. They live on in the hearts and minds of aircrews, groundcrews and enthusiasts alike. The F-4 Phantom may have reached the end of its front-line service with the RAF but the legend will live on for the big, powerful, beautifully ugly fighter. Revered by its aircrew for both its performance and firepower, the Phantom may be the last fighter-pilots fighter to have seen service with the RAF. Whether flying low-level combat air patrols over Germany, defending the Falkland Islands, or just simply chewing up the Tornado F3s and spitting out the remains over the North Sea, the Phantom has seen it all and done it all.
Item Code : MR0065Phantom Farewell by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 450 prints.

Published in 1986, we have the last 4 remaining copies of this sold out edition
Paper size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£25 Off!Now : £125.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


The Aircraft :
NameInfo
PhantomThe McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II is a tandem two-seat, twin-engined, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor fighter/fighter-bomber produced for the U.S. Navy by Mcdonnell Douglas. It became a major part of the United States Navy, Marine Corps and American Air Force. The Phantom F-4 saw service with all American forces during the Vietnam war serving as a fighter and ground attack aircraft. The Phantom first saw service in 1960 but continued in service until the 1980ís (being replaced by the F-15 and F-16 ) The last Phantoms saw service during the Gulf war in 1991 being used for reconnaissance. Other nations also used the Phantom to great success. The Israeli Air Force used them during various Arab-Israeli wars and the Phantom also saw service in the Iranian Air Force during the Iran Iraq War. Phantom production ran from 1958 to 1981, with a total of 5,195 built. The Royal Air Force and the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy flew versions based on the F-4. The British Phantoms were powered by Rolls Royce Spey engines and also received British avionics, under the names pf Phantom FG.1 and Phantom FGR.2. The last British Phantoms served with 74 Squadron until they were dispanded in 1992.
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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