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Phantom Farewell by Michael Rondot.


Phantom Farewell by Michael Rondot.

Old fighters never die and they dont fade away either. They live on in the hearts and minds of aircrews, groundcrews and enthusiasts alike. The F-4 Phantom may have reached the end of its front-line service with the RAF but the legend will live on for the big, powerful, beautifully ugly fighter. Revered by its aircrew for both its performance and firepower, the Phantom may be the last fighter-pilots fighter to have seen service with the RAF. Whether flying low-level combat air patrols over Germany, defending the Falkland Islands, or just simply chewing up the Tornado F3s and spitting out the remains over the North Sea, the Phantom has seen it all and done it all.
Item Code : MR0065Phantom Farewell by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 450 prints.

Published in 1986, we have the last 4 remaining copies of this sold out edition
Paper size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£25 Off!Now : £125.00

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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
PhantomThe McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II is a tandem two-seat, twin-engined, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor fighter/fighter-bomber produced for the U.S. Navy by Mcdonnell Douglas. It became a major part of the United States Navy, Marine Corps and American Air Force. The Phantom F-4 saw service with all American forces during the Vietnam war serving as a fighter and ground attack aircraft. The Phantom first saw service in 1960 but continued in service until the 1980s (being replaced by the F-15 and F-16 ) The last Phantoms saw service during the Gulf war in 1991 being used for reconnaissance. Other nations also used the Phantom to great success. The Israeli Air Force used them during various Arab-Israeli wars and the Phantom also saw service in the Iranian Air Force during the Iran Iraq War. Phantom production ran from 1958 to 1981, with a total of 5,195 built. The Royal Air Force and the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy flew versions based on the F-4. The British Phantoms were powered by Rolls Royce Spey engines and also received British avionics, under the names pf Phantom FG.1 and Phantom FGR.2. The last British Phantoms served with 74 Squadron until they were dispanded in 1992.
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

This Week's Half Price Art

 Messerschmitt Bf.109G-2s of 6./JG 5 sit quietly following a fresh snowfall in March 1943, the aircraft swept down and ready for action, should the call come.  Nearest aircraft is that of August Mors, 'Yellow 7', whilst the mount of Heinrich Ehrler, 'Yellow 12' sits nearby.  Just three months later, on 12th June, Mors was forced to abandon his stricken machine, baling out over enemy territory.  Despite this, he managed to evade capture and was back with his unit only six days later.

Eagle's Rest by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £1200.00
 USS Coral Sea (CV-43 being replenished by fast combat support ship USS Seattle (DE-3) as two of the carriers compliment of F.4s of VF-111 The Sundowners makes a low pass.

USS Coral Sea by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £2900.00
 Lancasters - B1 R5689 VN-N 50th Squadron RAF leads a gaggle of Lancs as they gain altitude to form up over the English coast.
Forming Up by Randall Wilson. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Squadron Leader H C Sawyer is depicted here flying his 65 Sqn Spitfire Mk.1a R6799 (YT-D) in the skies above Kent on 31st July 1940 at the height of the Battle of Britain. Chasing him is Major Hans Trubenbach of 1 Gruppe, Lehrgeschwader 2 in his Messerschmitt Vf109E-3 (Red 12) . The encounter lasted eight minutes with both pilots surviving.

High Pursuit by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Half Price! - £95.00

 Germays greatest exponent of the Fokker Dr1 Triplane, Leutnant Josef Jacobs is depicted chatting with colleagues of Jasta 7 before a sortie in the spring of 1918.  His black Triplane became well known to allied pilots, not least because of his formidable kill rate.  By the end of the war, still aged just 24, Jacobs had claimed 48 enemy aircraft destroyed.  The unusual practice of applying the black cross to the upper sides of the lower wings was to counter friendly fire from other German aircraft who frequently mistook the Dr1 for a Sopwith Triplane.

Leutnant Josef Jacobs by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The Disbandment Parade, Rheindahlen, 20th April 1993.
Royal Air Force Germany by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
The Hawker Hurricane powered by the powerful Rolls Royce Merlin engine is shown in combat with Luftwaffe aircraft during the Battle of Britain.  The Hurricane played a major role in the aerial victory along with its companion the Spitfire.

Merlin Roar by Anthony Saunders (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 The last Austro-Hungarian offensive on the Italian Front, known as the Battle of the Piave River, started on June 15th 1918 with 57 Austro-Hungarian divisions ranged against 58 Italian, 3 British and 2 French who were entrenched along the whole of the front line from the Asiago Plateau in the Alps, along the Piave river, to the marshes at the eastern end of the Venetian lagoon.  After initial successes in crossing the Piave in numerous places and establishing shallow bridgeheads from Montello to the Adriatic, the Austro-Hungarian offensive was brought to an abrupt halt, not least by a change in the weather that brought torrential rain and flooding of the Piave which, fuelled by the melting snow of the Alps, swept away bridges, pontoons, barges, horses and men. As the Austro-Hungarians attempted to supply their forward lines with men, weapons, ammunition and materials, the Italian artillery, consisting of 5,500 cannons and trench mortars continued to pound them, directed by the Drachen observation balloons of the 11° Sezione which were in place close to the Italian coastline. Flik 41J's top ace Hauptmann Godwin von Brumowski, flying his notorious red Albatros D.III (Oef) 135.209 replete with white skulls emblazoned on the fuselage, was on hand however, sending one of the balloons down in flames near Passerella on the fifth day of the offensive, its observer, probably Tenente M Zanini, making his escape by parachute.  This was Brumowski's 33rd victory of the war and his 34th was to follow just minutes later when he shared in the destruction of an Italian SAML S.2 that was strafing troops on the ground.

Drachen Slayer by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
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