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Arkle - the Legend by Peter Deighan.


Arkle - the Legend by Peter Deighan.

Item Code : PDH0017Arkle - the Legend by Peter Deighan. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 650 prints.Paper size 19 inches x 15 inches (48cm x 38cm)Artist : Peter Deighan£130.00

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Artist Details : Peter Deighan
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Peter Deighan


Peter Deighan

Peter Deighan was born in the county town of Monaghan, Ireland in 1941. It was while helping out on his uncle#39;s farm as a young lad he developed an affinity with horses which has remained with him through his adult life. As a 16-year-old Peter Deighan left Ireland to work in England and got a job as a trainee welder at Vauxhall Motors car plant in Luton, Bedfordshire. This work did little to satisfy his emerging creative talent. However, during this time Peter won an amateur art competition and was offered a scholarship at the Slade College of Art in London. Peter's raw artistic talent was quickly recognised and he began to receive commissions, including one from the Duke of Bedford. Peter held his first one-man exhibition in the Duke's stately home, Woburn Abbey. Among his earlier commissions were portraits of the comedian Eric Morecambe, footballer Jimmy Greaves, speaker of the house of Commons Selwyn Lloyd and Cardinal Basil Hume Archbishop of Westminister. Following the unqualified success of his one-man show, Peter became a full time artist, devoting all his energies and creativity to his main passion in life, painting. He was also able to combine his love of painting with his passion for horses. Peter quickly established a reputation as one of the world's leading equestrian artists. He received commissions from prominent members of the racing fraternity, including Dr and Mrs Vincent O'Brien, Mr and Mrs JP McManus, Mr and Mrs Robert Sangster, Captain and Mrs John MacDonald-Buchanan, and Sheikh Mohammed Al-Maktoum. So impressed were his patrons that they also commissioned Peter to paint their close family members. Among those who now hang a Deighan family portrait in their homes are the McManus, the Magnier and the Sangster families. Peter Deighan also painted the official portrait of the British Prime Minster John Major, thriller writer Frederick Forsyth (after meeting him on the Gay Byrne Late Late Show in Dublin), footballer Jimmy Greaves, snooker champion Steve Davis and boxer Barry McGuigan. He has had his paintings displayed in the annual exhibitions of the Royal Society of Portrait Painters and the Society of Equestrian Artists in London. Being such a talented and versatile painter, Peter turned his attention to some of his other interests in life. Following visits to southern Africa he painted a series of wildlife studies. His paintings of the indigenous population were particularly evocative. As Peter's reputation as one of the world's leading portrait painters grew, he began to receive commissions from North America. His most notable patrons included Payne Stewart. Peter visited Payne Stewart's home in Florida to paint a family group portrait. It was during his visit to Florida that Peter met and was commissioned to paint Tiger Woods and Mark O'Meara. Shortly after the tragic death of Payne Stewart, one of Peter's portraits of the golfer fetched 1.4 million at a JP McManus Charity auction. In 2005 Peter's painting of the Irish Ryder Cup players, a painting of Tiger Woods and Mark O'Meara were sold for similar sums at auction. Peter was commissioned to paint the 2006 European Ryder Cup players by Dr Michael Smurfit, for the K Club. Cranston Fine Arts are proud to offer Peter Deighan art prints direct to the public as part of its massive sporting range.

More about Peter Deighan

This Week's Half Price Art

 Last stand of the 24th South Wales Borderers at Isandhlwana during the Zulu War.  The battle of Isandhlwana, a Zulu victory over the British forces on 22nd January 1879 about 100km north of Durban.  Lord Chelmsford led a column of forces to seek out the Zulu army camped at Isandhlwana, while patrols searched the district.  After receiving a report, Chelmsford set forth at half strength, leaving six companies of the 24th Regiment, two guns, some Colonial Volunteers and a native contingent (in all about 1,800 troops) at the camp.  Later that morning an advanced post warned of an approaching Zulu army.  Shortly after this, thousands of Zulus were found hidden in a ravine by a mounted patrol but as the patrol set off to warn the camp, the Zulus followed.  At the orders of the Camp Commander, troops spread out around the perimeter of the camp, but the Zulu army broke through their defences.  The native contingent who fled during the attack were hunted down and killed.  The remaining troops of the 24th Regiment, 534 soldiers and 21 officers, were killed where they fought.  The Zulus left no one alive, taking no prisoners and leaving no wounded or missing.  About 300 Africans and 50 Europeans escaped the attack.  Consequently, the invasion of Zulu country was delayed while reinforcements arrived from Britain.

Battle of Isandhlwana, 22nd January 1879 by Brian Palmer. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The 2nd Battalion Worcester Regiment and South Wales Borderers arriving in the grounds of the Chateau at Gheluvelt after their historic counter attack on 31st October 1914.

Battle of Gheluvelt, 31st October 1914 by J P Beadle. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
 King Edward the 2nd on the field at Bannockburn with his body guard near.  He would later leave the battle in his escape as the battle was lost to Robert the Bruce.

Edward II at the Battle of Bannockburn by Jason Askew.
Half Price! - £70.00
 An SAS team is picked up by a U.S. Army Special Forces Blackhawk helicopter after a successful operation against the Taliban.

Extraction - Afghanistan 2011 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00

During the battle for Rorkes Drift, 24th Warwickshires man the improvised ramparts of the inner barricade as the Zulu attack reaches its height.

Stand Firm the 24th (Rorkes Drift) by Chris Collingwood. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Kharkov, Russia, February - March 1943.  After abandoning Rostov and Kharkov in the face of the Soviet Winter Offensive, Field Marshal Erich von Manstein set about the recapture of both.  Among those taking part in the ensuing counterattack was the newly promoted tank gunner Erich Barkmann, of 2nd Company 2nd SS Panzer Grenadier Division, who had just been given command of his own Panzer III.

The Long Road to Kharkov by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
Lassalle, shown here on Campaign in Prussia 1806. He was killed in the charge at the Battle of Wagram (1809) at the age of 34.
Le General Lassalle, Commandant La Brigade Infernal by Benigni.
Half Price! - £30.00
 The Battle of Isandlwana on 22 January 1879 was the first major encounter in the Anglo-Zulu War between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom. Eleven days after the British commenced their invasion of Zululand in South Africa, a Zulu force of some 10,000-12,000 warriors attacked a portion of the British main column consisting of about 1,800 British, colonial and native troops and perhaps 400 civilians. The Zulus were equipped mainly with the traditional Assegai iron spears and cow-hide shields, but also had a number of muskets and old rifles though they were not formally trained in their use. The British and colonial troops were armed with the state-of-the-art Martini-Henry breech-loading rifle and two 7 pounder artillery pieces as well as a rocket battery. Despite a vast disadvantage in weapons technology, the numerically superior Zulus ultimately overwhelmed the poorly led and badly deployed British, killing over 1,300 troops, including all those out on the forward firing line. The Zulu army suffered around 350 killed, and up to several hundred wounded. The battle was a crushing victory for the Zulus and caused the abandonment of the first British invasion of Zululand.

The Battle of Isandlwana by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - £3450.00
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