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Tim Henman by Simon Smith


Tim Henman by Simon Smith

In a career that has seen a dramatic rise in the world rankings, Tim Henman has already become the first British born player to be ranked in the top ten, an Olympic silver medalist and Wimbledon semi-finalist. Tim is poised to break through and win one of the Grand Slams that every professional craves and gain success for Britain in the Davis Cup World Group in 1999. Tims finest year to date, was capped by his becoming the first Briton to reach the semi-finals of the ATP World Championship in Hanover.
Item Code : SG0001Tim Henman by Simon Smith - This Edition
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PRINT Limited edition of 495 prints.

Last 2 print available of this edition - now sold out at the publisher.
Image size 27.5 inches x 19.5 inches (70cm x 49cm) Henman, Tim
+ Artist : Simon Smith


Signature(s) value alone : £30
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Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
Tim Henman
*Signature Value : £30

Former British number 1 tennis player. He was the first player from the United Kingdom since Roger Taylor in the 1970s to reach the semi-finals of the Wimbledon Mens Singles Championship. Having reached six Grand Slam semi-finals, 11 career ATP titles, and been ranked number 4 in the world, he became Britain's most successful open era player, with his trademark playing style of Serve and Volley. Now retired, Henman is now often seen commentating for television and radio.
Artist Details : Simon Smith
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Simon Smith


Simon Smith

Simon Smith was born in 1960 into a military family and quickly developed an interest in history and the armed forces. He has worked continually as an illustrator in the historical field since leaving art college in 1982, having graduated with a First in Fine Art and Illustration.. He has work on permanent display in London and countries as far afield as Taiwan and Israel. Simon owes his lifelong interest in military subjects to his family connections with the services.

More about Simon Smith

This Week's Half Price Art

Royal Engineers Clearing one of the Convoy Routes (Route TRIANGLE) in the mountains of Central Bosnia, for a convoy of Royal Logistics Corps (RLC) vehicles.  David Rowlands travelled this muddy route in early 1993, bouncing and rocking in a Land Rover on my way to Gornji Vakuf with members of 8 Squadron RLC.  I made sketches at various points, including Camp Redoubt and the lake near Prozor.  Two days earlier on 5th April 1993, at Omis Camp, he watched a small ceremonial parade when members of the Royal Corps of Transport re-badged as part of the newly-formed Royal Logistic Corps.

Royal Engineer Regiment by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 A Voltigeur corporal, 2nd battalion, 4th regiment etranger, Holland 1813.

Tireur D Elite by Mark Churms.
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GDHM3019GL. Sergeant John McAulay, 1st Battalion Scots Guards Winning the VC at Fontaine Notre Dame, France 27th November 1917 By David Rowlands.
Sergeant John McAulay, 1st Battalion Scots Guards Winning the VC at Fontaine Notre Dame, France 27th November 1917 By David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
VAR336GS.   Caractacus being Paraded by the Emperor Claudius, AD50 by Thomas Davidson.
Caractacus being Paraded by the Emperor Claudius, AD50 by Thomas Davidson. (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00

When Portuguese traders took advantage of the constant violence in Japan to sell the Japanese their first firearms, one of the quickest to take advantage of this new technology was the powerful daimyo Oda Nobunaga. In 1575 the impetuous Takeda Katsuyori lay siege to Nagashino castle, a possession of an ally of Nobunagas, Tokugawa Ieyasu. An army was despatched to relieve the siege by Nobunaga and Ieyasu, two of the most influential figures in Japanese history, and the two sides faced each other across the plain of Shidarahara. The Takeda samurai were brave, loyal and renowned for their cavalry charges, but Nobunaga, counting on Katsuyoris impetuosity, had 3,000 musketeers waiting behind prepared defences for their assault. The outcome of this clash of tactics and technologies was to change the face of Japanese warfare forever.

Battle of Nagashino by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £60.00
The Duke of Cumberland, their colonel, commanding the allied forces; measured his strength with Marshal Saxe, who was then besieging Tournay.  The First Guards were on the right of the centre, in the first line, when the Duke, furious at the failure on both wings, ordered the masses of troops to attack.  The infantry dashed forward between the village and the redoubt, and as the British Guards advanced over a low ridge, and saw the French Guards before them, a scene occurred which has become legendary in military history. 'Messieurs les Anglais, tirez les premiers!' is a phrase that bespeaks the old fashioned chivalry with which foemen worthy of each other's steel loved to treat one another.  The story of what occurred is variously given.  'The officers of the English Guards,' says Voltaire, 'when in the presence of the enemy, saluted the French by taking off their hats.  The Comte de Chabannes, and the Duc de Biron, who were in advance returned the salute, as did all the officers of the French Guards.  Lord Charles Hay of the King's Company, 1st Guards, stepped forward and took off his hat.  Lord Charles Hay then pulled out a flask and drank a toast to the French, saying: 'Gentlemen of the French Guard, I hope you will wait for us today and not escape by swimming the Scheldt as you swam the Main at Dettingen.'  Then he turned to his Company and said: 'Men of the King's Company, these are the French Guards and I hope you are going to beat them today.'  Count D'Anteroche, lieutenant of grenadiers, replied in a loud voice:  'Gentlemen, we never fire first; we will follow you.'  The French troops opened fire first but most of their shots went high.  Then the British troops opened fire and nineteen officers and up to 600 men of the French Guards are said to have fallen at the first discharge, as the English pushed on, the enemy were borne back, and in the face of a terrific fire, the Guards drove them into their camp. Here, exposed to the tremendous reverse fire of the redoubt of Eu, the Guards according to Rousseau, formed themselves into a kind of square, and resisted repeated attacks of the cavalry of the French Guards and Carabineers.  But unsupported and decimated by the withering hail of iron that assailed them, attacked by fresh troops and the Irish brigades of Clare and Dillon, beset as in a fiery furnace, the Guards at length began to retire.  They did so in perfect order; but the First Guards left 4 officers, 3 sergeants and 82 men dead on the field, besides having 149 wounded in all.  It was a defeat due to bad generalship and want of cohesion among allies, but its sanguinary episodes added new lustre to the great fame of the Guards. 'There are things, 'says Marshal Saxe, - or some say his friend General D'Heronville, in his Trait des Legions - 'which all of us have seen, but of which our pride makes us silent because we well know we cannot imitate them.'  Fontenoy was a defeat for the British army.  During the battle Lord Charles Hay was wounded but would later be in action again.

The Battle of Fontenoy by Felix Philippoteaux (B)
Half Price! - £30.00
 Study for the original painting Charge and Pursue.
Lucknow 1857 - Queens Bays Trooper Engaging Mutinous Officer by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £145.00
The siege is shown at the last days, as Oliver Cromwell is shown urging his troops forward.
Cromwell at the Storming of Basing House by Ernest Crofts.
Half Price! - £40.00
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