Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over 220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

Product Search        




Item Code : - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
noneSOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


This Week's Half Price Art

 Sturmtigers of Sturmmorser Company 1002, commanded by Lieutenant Zippel, take on ammunition in preparation for the battle to come. These fearsome monsters 38cm rocket projectors could penetrate up to 2.5m of reinforced concrete. Luckily for the Allies only 18 were completed by the wars end.

Preparing for the Day, the Reichswald, February 1945 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - 90.00
 The Battle of Isandlwana on 22 January 1879 was the first major encounter in the Anglo-Zulu War between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom. Eleven days after the British commenced their invasion of Zululand in South Africa, a Zulu force of some 10,000-12,000 warriors attacked a portion of the British main column consisting of about 1,800 British, colonial and native troops and perhaps 400 civilians. The Zulus were equipped mainly with the traditional Assegai iron spears and cow-hide shields, but also had a number of muskets and old rifles though they were not formally trained in their use. The British and colonial troops were armed with the state-of-the-art Martini-Henry breech-loading rifle and two 7 pounder artillery pieces as well as a rocket battery. Despite a vast disadvantage in weapons technology, the numerically superior Zulus ultimately overwhelmed the poorly led and badly deployed British, killing over 1,300 troops, including all those out on the forward firing line. The Zulu army suffered around 350 killed, and up to several hundred wounded. The battle was a crushing victory for the Zulus and caused the abandonment of the first British invasion of Zululand.

The Battle of Isandlwana by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - 3200.00
 Depicting Napoleon overlooking the arrival of the Guard Horse Artillery.

Arrival of the Horse Artillery at Eylau by Benigni. (Y)
Half Price! - 25.00
 Wearing patched white trousers and gaiters made of mattress ticking. In the mid distance, officers of the Polish Lancers and the Guard. Napoleon stands on the distant cliff. To the right a ship flies a tricolour. The Elba battalion was Napoleons bodyguard in exile, comprising six companies of Guardsmen, 100 artillery men and a crew of 21 seamen, They formed the nucleus of the Imperial Guard in 1815.

A Grenadier of the Guard at Elba by Horace Vernet. (Y)
Half Price! - 25.00

Rome AD52, Gladiatorial Combat under the eyes of the Emperor Claudius (actual name, Tiberius Claudius Drusus Nero) a great supporter of the games. Seen are the Net and Trident fighter Retiarius matched with a more heavily armed Mirmillone, whilst in the background a successful Secutor seeks permission for the killing stroke.

Morituri Te Saluttant (For Those About to Die Salute You) by Chris Collingwood (GL)
Half Price! - 395.00


Napoleon at Boulogne by Maurice Orange. (Y)
Half Price! - 25.00
DHM1601P. Ride Like the Devil - the Charge of the 13th Light Dragoons at the Battle of Vittoria by Chris Collingwood.

Ride Like the Devil - the Charge of the 13th Light Dragoons at the Battle of Vittoria by Chris Collingwood. (P)
Half Price! - 4250.00
 Helmand Province, Afghanistan, July 2009.  Troops of the 2nd Mercian Regiment 19th Light Brigade engaged on compound searches during Operation Panchai Palang.

Green Zone Patrol by David Pentland.
Half Price! - 70.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket