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This Week's Half Price Art

 It is August 1944, barely two months since the Allies landed their first troops on the beaches of Normandy. After the failed Operation Lüttich (codename given to a German counterattack during the Battle of Normandy, which took place around the American positions near Mortain from 7 August to 13 August, 1944 ) The German Panzer Divisions were in full retreat, The British and American Generals believed it to be critical to halt them before they cauld regroup. Caught in the Gap at Falaise, the battle was to be decisive. Flying throughout a continuous onslaught, rocket-firing Typhoons kept up their attacks on the trapped armoured divisions from dawn to dusk. The effect was devastating: at the end of the ten day battle the 100,000 strong German force was decimated. The battle of the Falaise Pocket marked the closing phase of the Battle of Normandy with a decisive German defeat. It is believed that between 80,000 to 100,000 German troops were caught in the encirclement of which 10,000 to 15,000 were killed, 45,000 to 50,000 taken prisoner, and around 20,000 escaped . Shown here are German Tiger I tanks under continues attack by Royal Aoir Force Typhoons.

Taming the Tiger by Geoff Lea. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Helmand Province, Afghanistan, July 2009.  Troops of the 2nd Mercian Regiment 19th Light Brigade engaged on compound searches during Operation Panchai Palang.

Green Zone Patrol by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - £85.00
 Baron de Donops Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo, 5.30pm, 18th June 1815.  After four hours of fighting, the squadrons of Napoleons 3rd Cavalry Corps finally join the massed assaults on the battered allied infantry squares.  With the 42 year old marechal de camp Frederic-Guillaume de Donop at their head, the 2nd and 3rd Cuirassier Regiments break from a trot into a canter as they clear the ridge.  The heavy cavalry are smashed against the steadfast bayonets of the redcoats and countercharged by light horsemen.  In one of these encounters the general himself is terribly wounded and falls from his horse. His son (aide-de-camp) is also injured.  Both are reported missing and presumed captured.  Although the generals body is not found,it is certain that he met his death in the muddy fields of Waterloo alongside many of his brigade.  In 1895 his name is inscribed on the north face of LArc de Triomphe in Paris in recognition of his service to France.

La Charge (Donops Cavalry at Waterloo) by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Although a very brown picture, it shows the Lancashire Regiment, coming of the beaches during the Gallipoli Campaign.

Gallipoli by Charles Dixon.
Half Price! - £25.00

So Tell The Spartans, Stranger passing by that here, Obedient to their laws, we lie.   In 480 BC the Spartans tried to defend the pass at Thermopylae against the Persians led by Xerxes.  The Persian fleet had sailed along the coastline from northern Greece into the Gulf of Malia on the eastern Aegean Sea towards the mountains at Thermopylae. The Greek General and King Leonidas led the Greeks  and tried to defend the pass of Thermopylae.  All the defending Spartans were killed during the Battle of Thermopylae. Their defence and courage provided inspiration to the Greeks, and the following year the Greeks won battles against their old enemy the Persians.

Thermopylae 480BC, Spartan and Thespaian Hoplites. By Chris Collingwood. (GL)
Half Price! - £400.00
 Unterscharfurher Karl-Heinz Turk of the Schwere SS Panzerabteilung 503, in one of the units few remaining Kingtigers, defends the Potsdammer Platz along with elements of the Munchberg Division against the rapidly encroaching Soviet forces.

The Last Battle, Berlin, April 30th 1945 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Leading 30th Corps assault across the Seine at Vernon, 43rd Wessex Division gained an initial foothold on the east bank.  Heroic efforts however by the Royal Engineers of 71st, 72nd and 73rd Field Companies, succeeded in constructing a Class 9 Bailey bridge (David, shown left) and a Second Class 40 bridge (Goliath, shown right)  Despite constant enemy fire this amazing feat was achieved in only 2 days, and allowed 15/19th Hussars Cromwells and 4.7th Dragoons Guards Shermans to cross just in time to repulse a serious German counter attack by Tiger IIs of SS Panzer Abteilung 101.

David and Goliath, Vernon, France, 27th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Medical Emergency Response Team.

Training Inside the MERT by Graeme Lothian. (P)
Half Price! - £1800.00
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