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This Week's Half Price Art

Between 18th and 23rd February, 1991, immediately preceding the ground assault, Iraqi defensive positions were bombarded by British and American artillery.  The Artillery Raids took place just inside the Saudi border all along the front line, from the east coast to west of the Wadi al Batin.  The 1st Armoured Division's contribution to the raids was the largest concentration of British artillery since the Second World War.  Further behind the M109 and M110 guns and the locating batteries were the armoured vehicle-mounted rocket launchers of the Multi-Launch Rocket System (MLRS).  39 Heavy Regiment, the only British regiment equipped with MLRS, fired five 'fireplans', one of them at night.  MLRS can ripple-fire 12 rockets in less than one minute.  The Artillery Raids were a major factor in the success of Operation Desert Sword because they contributed to the deception plan by concealing the main point of effort.  The ammunition itself was terrifyingly destructive.  Furthermore, Iraqi morale, already damaged by the air assaults, was crushed by the artillery bombardment.  At the right of the scene a DROPS vehicle of the Royal Corps of Transport is delivering Rocket Pod Containers, and gunners are preparing to re-arm the MLRS.
The Artillery Raids, 18th / 23rd February 1991 by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Lieut. George Cairns of the South Staffordshire Regiment at the Battle of Pagoda Hill, Burma, 13th March 1944, along with the 3rd/6th Gurkha Rifles.
Lieutenant George Cairns VC, at the Battle of Pagoda Hill, Burma 13th March 1944 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £280.00
Military art print of the Franco-Prussian war showing French Infantry defenders at the fortifications of Champigny.
The Defence of Champigny, November 30th 1870 by Edouard Detaille.
Half Price! - £20.00
 Painted in the 15th Century, the artist having no concept of military dress of the time of Alexander, painted figures in the armour of the 14/15th centuries.
Battle of Issus by Albrecht Altdorfer. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00

 Sturmtigers of Sturmmorser Company 1002, commanded by Lieutenant Zippel, take on ammunition in preparation for the battle to come. These fearsome monsters 38cm rocket projectors could penetrate up to 2.5m of reinforced concrete. Luckily for the Allies only 18 were completed by the wars end.

Preparing for the Day, the Reichswald, February 1945 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00
 Bastogne, Ardennes, Belgium, 20th December 1944.  Newly arrived 81mm Mortars of 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division, fire in support of U.S. Paratroopers defending against German probes to the north of Bastogne.

Fire for Effect by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £70.00
 A Tiger (P) Ferdinand, 7th Company, 654th Schwere Panzerjager Abteilung passes a knocked out Soviet Su122 on the German advance towards the village of Ponyri.  The fighting around this small agricultural settlement was some of the most savage of the entire battle.

The Battle for Ponyri Station, Kursk, 9th July 1943†by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £40.00
 Baron de Donops Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo, 5.30pm, 18th June 1815.  After four hours of fighting, the squadrons of Napoleons 3rd Cavalry Corps finally join the massed assaults on the battered allied infantry squares.  With the 42 year old marechal de camp Frederic-Guillaume de Donop at their head, the 2nd and 3rd Cuirassier Regiments break from a trot into a canter as they clear the ridge.  The heavy cavalry are smashed against the steadfast bayonets of the redcoats and countercharged by light horsemen.  In one of these encounters the general himself is terribly wounded and falls from his horse. His son (aide-de-camp) is also injured.  Both are reported missing and presumed captured.  Although the generals body is not found,it is certain that he met his death in the muddy fields of Waterloo alongside many of his brigade.  In 1895 his name is inscribed on the north face of LArc de Triomphe in Paris in recognition of his service to France.

La Charge (Donops Cavalry at Waterloo) by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
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