Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        
Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
Many of our offers end in 11 hours, 21 minutes!
View our Special Offers

Prince of Wales Own West Yorkshire Regiment (14th foot) by Richard Simkin.


Prince of Wales Own West Yorkshire Regiment (14th foot) by Richard Simkin.

Printed on high quality 300gsm German etching stock. Only 25 copies of this superb quality reprint are available.
Item Code : AU0053Prince of Wales Own West Yorkshire Regiment (14th foot) by Richard Simkin. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Special edition of 25 reprints.

Paper and Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)none£18.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Prince of Wales Own West Yorkshire Regiment (14th foot) by Richard Simkin AU0053
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original chromolithograph. Size 10 inches x 13 inches (25cm x 33cm)none£130.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Artist Details : Richard Simkin
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Simkin

Richard Simkin

Born on November 5th 1850 and was born in Herne Bay Kent, England, Richard Simkin grew up in Aldershot, Hampshire, marrying his wife, Harriet, in 1880, and it is also believed he was a volunteer in the Artist's Rifles. He was employed by the War Office to design recruiting posters. He is probabaly best know for his series of Army regiments including Yeomanry and Colonial regiments, a weekly supplement print to the Army and Navy Gazette. In 1901 he created a series of 'Types of the Indian Army' for the Gazette. He obtained much of the information from the Colonial and India Exhibition of 1886. Over a period of over 50 years Richard Simkin produced thousands of watercolours of Army uniforms and watercolours of Army life and campaigns. Many of these paintings can be seen in regimental museums and messes. Simkin also contributed illustrations to The Army and Navy gazzette, the Boy's Own Magazine, and The Graphic and many paintings were used in books and publications of Raphael Tuck and Sons. Richard Simkin died on the 25th June 1926 at home at 7 Cavensigh Street, Herne Bay. Many of richard Simkin's antique prints have been reproduced as prints by Cranston Fine Arts and are available from our websites, along with many original antique prints which are hard to find these days.

More about Richard Simkin

This Week's Half Price Art

On a dark winter evening, the Permanent Vehicle Check Point (PVCP) north of Rosslea, close to the border with Monaghan, was manned by 8 soldiers commanded by Corporal Robert Duncan.  In response to a threat to the border locations an additional 4-man team commanded by Corporal Ian Harvey was on external patrol.  From the direction of the border a specially armour-plated lorry, with about twelve terrorists intent on destroying the base stopped, and as Private Houston checked the back of it, automatic gunfire opened up from Armalite and AK47 rifles.  Grenades were thrown into the base, and a flame-thrower was aimed at the command sangar.  Two RPG7 Rockets were fired at the observation sangar.  Heavy suppressive fire continued as the lorry reversed and smashed its way into the compound.  Two soldiers were killed.  The truck drove out of the devastated PVCP, and a red transit van drove in, laden with explosives.  Fortunately only the booster charge exploded.  As the patrol came up rapidly, firing at the terrorists, the truck drove off at speed, its two machine-guns mounted on the rear firing, its driver intent on escape.  It was found abandoned at the border with a 210 kg bomb on board.  The scale and type of this attack had never been seen before in Northern Ireland.  Every soldier involved acted with exemplary courage and the determination to defeat the enemy.  The conduct of Corporals Duncan and Harvey was in the highest traditions of conspicuous gallantry.  Each received the Distinguished Conduct Medal.  The events of the Derryard Action are a landmark in the modern fighting history of the King's Own Scottish Borderers.  I was phoned soon after the action.  I flew to Belfast and was driven to the location.  In order to paint the action it was important to see the PVCP in its scarred condition, before it was repaired.  The lonely, isolated building put me in mind of the beleaguered little forts which dotted this part of Ireland in the time of Queen Elizabeth I.  The soldiers took up the positions they had fought in, while I sketched them in their Tam-o'-shanters.  Corporal Ian Harvey is in the foreground with Pte Maxwell.  Cpl Robert Duncan kneels in the road.
1st Battalion Kings Owns Scottish Borderers. The Derryard Action, Co Fermanagh, December 13th 1989 by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
DHM193GS.  Trumpeter of the French Cuirassiers Going to Battle by Detaille.

Trumpeter of the French Cuirassiers Going to Battle by Edouard Detaille (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 Robert the Bruces Scots army stand fast as the English knights attack. Robert the Bruce succeeds in defeating the English army at Stirling.  With the full might of Englands army gathered before the besieged Stirling Castle, Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory. To the west of Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots, kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God.  Patiently awaiting the coming onslaught in tightly packed schiltroms, his spearmen and archers are well prepared for battle. Unknown to the English, the open marsh of no mans land conceals hidden pits and calthrops, major obstacles for any mounted charge. Despite Cliffords and Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve Stirling the day before, years of victory have caused the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the flower of the forest (archers) to weaken the enemy formations, the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush, hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester, thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable mass of spears, hurling themselves into defeat and death. With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through but the infantry stand firm. There is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground. Casualties amongst the English nobility are horrific. Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The English recoil and are pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn where many perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of the castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland, victory is complete.

The Battle of Bannockburn by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £80.00
On January 22nd 1879, during the Zulu War, the small British field hospital and supply depot at Rorkes Drift in Natal was the site of one of the most heroic military defences of all time.  Manned by 140 troops of the 24th Regiment, led by Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, the camp was attacke by a well-trained and well-equipped Zulu army of 4000 men, heartened by the great Zulu victory over the British forces at Isandhlwana earlier on the same day.  The battle began in mid afternoon, when British remnants of the defeat at Isandhlwana struggled into the camp.  Anticipating trouble, Chard set his small force to guard the perimeter fence but, when the Zulu attack began, the Zulus came faster than the British could shoot and the camp was soon overcome.  The thatched roof of the hospital was fired by Zulu spears wrapped in burning grass and even some of the sick and the dying were dragged from their beds and pressed into the desperate hand-to-hand fighting.  Eventually, Chard gave the order to withdraw from the perimeter and to take position in a smaller compound, protected by a hastily assembled barricade of boxes and it was from behind this barricade that the garrison fought for their lives throughout the night.  After twelve hours of battle, the camp was destroyed, the hospital had burned to the ground, seventeen British lay dead and ten were wounded.  However, the Zulus had been repulsed and over 400 of their men killed.  The Battle of Rorkes Drift is one of the greatest examples of bravery and heroism in British military history.  Nine men were awarded Distinguished Conduct Medals, and eleven, the most ever given for a single battle, received the highest military honour of all, the Victoria Cross.

Defence of Rorkes Drift by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

Battle of Louisburg during the French and Indian Wars,  A British Force set out to capture the French Fortress of Louisburg at Cape Breton island. A Army of New Englanders under the command of Col. William Pepperell supported by an English Fleet under Commander  Peter Warren.  Attacked the Fortress of Louisburg on April 30th 1745 and finally captured the fortress on June 17th.  A great British Victory which endangered  the French position in North America.   The fortifications were handed back to France in 1748 in the treaty of Aix-La-Chapelle.

Siege of Louisburg, Canada, July 1745 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
9th (Irish) Field Battery firing on the Run-in-shoot to Queen Beach. They were the first rounds fired at the Normandy Coast, D-Day 6th June, 1944. Queen Beach, one of the 4 sectors of Sword Beach, where most of the landings of D-Day were carried out. The Queen Beach sector which extended for 1.5km between Lion-sur-Mer and the western edge of Ouistretham. The attack was thus concentrated on a narrow one-brigade front. For once the DD tanks and other armour came in exactly on time and ahead of the infantry. The 8th brigade, with the 1st Battalion of the South Lancashire Regiment on the right and the 2nd East Yorkshire on the left.

Operation Overlord by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
A lone French soldier is herded into captivity after being captured during the Franco Prussian war.
Captive Difficile by Alphonse de Neuville (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
Battle of Crecy  26th August 1346. On 12th July Edward III landed in Normandy with his army and marching north plundered the countryside. King Philip VI assembled an army to stop Edward and tracked them across the Somme River. When Edward reached Crecy he stopped and ordered his army to take up defensive positions. King Philip surveyed the English positions and decided to postpone his attack until August 27th. However, the French vanguard pressed forward too far and so committed the entire army to the battle. The hired Genoese crossbowmen began the assault but came under severe attack from the English longbows and so fled to the rear. King Philip then ordered his cavalry to charge resulting in a huge loss of horse and man under the barrage of arrows which rained down on them. By the end of the night after several unsuccessful assaults the French army was reduced by a third and King John of Luxemburg was dead. Edward then turned towards Calais.

Battle of Crecy by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £70.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket