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19th Hussars by Richard Simkin.


19th Hussars by Richard Simkin.

Printed on high quality 300gsm German etching stock. Only 25 copies of this superb quality reprint are available.
Item Code : AU002919th Hussars by Richard Simkin. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Special edition of 25 reprints.

Paper and Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)none£18.00

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Other editions of this item : 19th Hussars by Richard Simkin AU0029
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original chromolithograph from the supplement of the Army and Navy Gazette, May 3rd 1890. Image size 10 inches x 13 inches (25cm x 33cm)none£130.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Artist Details : Richard Simkin
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Simkin

Richard Simkin

Born on November 5th 1850 and was born in Herne Bay Kent, England, Richard Simkin grew up in Aldershot, Hampshire, marrying his wife, Harriet, in 1880, and it is also believed he was a volunteer in the Artist's Rifles. He was employed by the War Office to design recruiting posters. He is probabaly best know for his series of Army regiments including Yeomanry and Colonial regiments, a weekly supplement print to the Army and Navy Gazette. In 1901 he created a series of 'Types of the Indian Army' for the Gazette. He obtained much of the information from the Colonial and India Exhibition of 1886. Over a period of over 50 years Richard Simkin produced thousands of watercolours of Army uniforms and watercolours of Army life and campaigns. Many of these paintings can be seen in regimental museums and messes. Simkin also contributed illustrations to The Army and Navy gazzette, the Boy's Own Magazine, and The Graphic and many paintings were used in books and publications of Raphael Tuck and Sons. Richard Simkin died on the 25th June 1926 at home at 7 Cavensigh Street, Herne Bay. Many of richard Simkin's antique prints have been reproduced as prints by Cranston Fine Arts and are available from our websites, along with many original antique prints which are hard to find these days.

More about Richard Simkin

This Week's Half Price Art

 Men of the 24th Foot defend Rorkes Drift against an overwhelming number of Zulus near the barricades, and the hand to hand fighting. Surgeon Reynolds can be seen attending a wounded soldier.

Defence of Rorkes Drift by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Dawn.  British artillery thundered, and the territorial soldiers 15th Scottish division stormed towards the  German trenches defending the  coal mining village of Loos.  The gas cloud that preceded the Highland advance was pendulous and largely stationary due to a distinct lack of wind, and ,upon emerging from the smudgy gas, the highlanders were pelted with  machine gun fire and shrapnel from the defending German batteries.  Not to be denied, the Scots gritted their teeth, and with an officer shouting faster boys! give them hell! the highlanders charged straight at the defenses. The Germans, unnerved by the stubborn courage of their kilted opponents, began to fall back through the village of Loos.  The Camerons and the Black Watch, shouting their battle cry and charging down the main road of the village, then engaged the defending Germans in a series of savage battles for each and every house - hob-nailed boots, rifle butts, and bayonets being wielded with great enthusiasm by the vengeful Scots.  By 8.00am the village was in Scottish hands.

Faster Boys - Give Them Hell! Loos, September 25th 1915 by Jason Askew. (GM)
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Charles Edward Stuart on Board a French Warship bound for France, takes his last look at Scotland disappearing from view and reflects over the events of the previous year and what might have been.
The End of the Jacobite Dream by Brian Wood.
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 Samurai Warriors of the Sekighahara campaign 1600.  The most important and decisive battle in the history of Japan, Sekigahara was the culmination of the Power struggle triggered by the death of the great warlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi. The two rivals for power were Ishida Mitsunari and Tokugawa Ieyasu. The contest was ultimately settled by force of arms in a small mountain valley in central Japan. By the end of the day 40,000 heads had been taken and Ieyasu was master of Japan. Within three years the Emperor would grant him the title he sought - Shogun.

Samurai Warriors by Chris Collingwood (GS)
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 Icy rain adds its misery to the bitter conflict on Drumossie Moor. In the shadow of the Black Isle, two English ships on the waters of the Moray Firth, await the outcome of the decisive battle. Pounded by Cumberlands gunners and raked by steady musketry, the Princes brave men can make no headway. Although the Irish and French regulars refuse to give ground, the Jacobite lines gradually disintegrate. Tired, cold and hungry men flea past Culloden House for the relative safety of Inverness. On the Scottish right the Argyll Militia, supported by Hawleys Dragoons, tear down the walls of the Culwiniac and Culchunaig enclosures in an outflanking attack. Avochies men offer some resistance but Major Gillies McBean stands alone on the breach. He cuts down more than a dozen Argylls, including Lord Robert Kerr, who lies mortally wounded, but his foes are too many. The hero eventually falls to a vicious cut to the forehead, his thigh bone is also broken. Despite the cries of a mounted officer to save that brave man, the major is ruthlessly bayonetted, his back against the wall. The victory is complete and nothing more can be done. In the distance, the Young Pretender is forced to abandon the field and Scotlands hope of claiming the British Throne.

Battle of Culloden by Mark Churms. (Y)
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 On January 22nd 1879, during the Zulu War, the small British field hospital and supply depot at Rorkes Drift in Natal was the site of one of the most heroic military defences of all time. Manned by 140 troops of the 24th Regiment, led by Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, the camp was attacke by a well-trained and well-equipped Zulu army of 4000 men, heartened by the great Zulu victory over the British forces at Isandhlwana earlier on the same day. The battle began in mid afternoon, when British remnants of the defeat at Isandhlwana struggled into the camp. Anticipating trouble, Chard set his small force to guard the perimeter fence but, when the Zulu attack began, the Zulus came faster than the British could shoot and the camp was soon overcome. The thatched roof of the hospital was fired by Zulu spears wrapped in burning grass and even some of the sick and the dying were dragged from their beds and pressed into the desperate hand-to-hand fighting. Eventually, Chard gave the order to withdraw from the perimeter and to take position in a smaller compound, protected by a hastily assembled barricade of boxes and it was from behind this barricade that the garrison fought for their lives throughout the night. After twelve hours of battle, the camp was destroyed, the hospital had burned to the ground, seventeen British lay dead and ten were wounded. However, the Zulus had been repulsed and over 400 of their men killed. The Battle of Rorkes Drift is one of the greatest examples of bravery and heroism in British military history. Nine men were awarded Distinguished Conduct Medals, and eleven, the most ever given for a single battle, received the highest military honour of all, the Victoria Cross.

Defence of Rorkes Drift by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (C)
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In December 1941, Japan entered the Second World War and invaded southern Burma. 17th Indian Infantry Division withdrew to the Sittang River to prevent the Japanese reaching the bridge first, which would have allowed them free access to Rangoon. 2nd Bn The Duke of Wellington's Regiment was rushed from India to join the rearguard.The river, spanned by the railway bridge, was fast-flowing and nearly 1000 yards wide. The bridge was prepared for demolition. Troops mainly from the Indian Army were defending the bridgehead, having suffered severe casualties during a fighting retreat over many days. By 22nd February the Divisional commander decided that he had little choice but to order the demolition of the bridge, knowing that two-thirds of his Division would be stranded on the far bank.As the two central spans of the bridge were blown, the exhausted troops continued fighting to prevent the Japanese securing the bridgehead. This allowed many troops to continue to cross the bridge with the aid of ropes, and rafts made from anything that would float. Others had to swim. The demolition of the bridge was the greatest disaster in the epic fighting retreat of the small, outnumbered British force in Burma, which covered nearly 1,000 miles in three and a half months.

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Showing French Dragoons looking on as a meeting takes place between a French officer and an Austrian officer.

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