Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!

Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!


Product Search        

6th Dragoon Guards by Richard Simkin.

6th Dragoon Guards by Richard Simkin.

Printed on high quality 300gsm German etching stock. Only 25 copies of this superb quality reprint are available.
Item Code : AU00096th Dragoon Guards by Richard Simkin. - This Edition
PRINT Special edition of 25 reprints.

Paper and Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)none£18.00

All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Other editions of this item : 6th Dragoon Guards by Richard Simkin AU0009
Original chromolithograph from the supplement of the Army and Navy Gazette, September 1st 1888. Image size 10 inches x 13 inches (25cm x 33cm)none£140.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :

Artist Details : Richard Simkin
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Simkin

Richard Simkin

Born on November 5th 1850 and was born in Herne Bay Kent, England, Richard Simkin grew up in Aldershot, Hampshire, marrying his wife, Harriet, in 1880, and it is also believed he was a volunteer in the Artist's Rifles. He was employed by the War Office to design recruiting posters. He is probabaly best know for his series of Army regiments including Yeomanry and Colonial regiments, a weekly supplement print to the Army and Navy Gazette. In 1901 he created a series of 'Types of the Indian Army' for the Gazette. He obtained much of the information from the Colonial and India Exhibition of 1886. Over a period of over 50 years Richard Simkin produced thousands of watercolours of Army uniforms and watercolours of Army life and campaigns. Many of these paintings can be seen in regimental museums and messes. Simkin also contributed illustrations to The Army and Navy gazzette, the Boy's Own Magazine, and The Graphic and many paintings were used in books and publications of Raphael Tuck and Sons. Richard Simkin died on the 25th June 1926 at home at 7 Cavensigh Street, Herne Bay. Many of richard Simkin's antique prints have been reproduced as prints by Cranston Fine Arts and are available from our websites, along with many original antique prints which are hard to find these days.

More about Richard Simkin

This Week's Half Price Art

 Illustrates the scene at Modderfontein Farm where a squadron of the 17th lancers were pinned down by a large Boer force, and fought to the finish.  Modderfontein Farm in the Eastern Cape, about 10 miles from Tarkastad, was the the battle on the 17th September 1901, between the 17th Lancers who had camped there, and General Jan Christiaan Smut's Boer Commandos.  C squadron of the 17th Lancers lost 3 Officers and 35 troopers, a single action in which the 17th Lancers lost more men in one day than any other day, inclduing that of the infamous charge of the Light Brigade.  Also killed that day were three gunners from the Royal Garrison Artillery.  Another account states that out of 130 men, 29 were killed and 41 wounded.  All Officers had been killed or wounded.

All That Was Left of Them by Richard Caton Woodville (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
Depicting Lord Cornwallis surrendering to Washington and the Marquis de Lafeyette at Yorktown in 1781.
Seige of Yorktown by Couder.
Half Price! - £35.00
 Sturmgeschutz IIIg and Paratroops of the 4th Fallschirmjager Division, driving to the front line, pass one of the two giant 28cm K5 (Eisenbaum) railway guns responsible for the shelling the Allied beacheads at Anzio and Nettuno.

Anzio Annie, Italy, 29th January 1945 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Shows the French Cuirassiers of the 2nd Empire of Napoleon the 3rd.

Le Drapeau by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00

 Private Thomas Brown of the 3rd kings own regiment of Dragoons, is knighted by King George the II, (The last reigning British Monarch to be at a Battle) Brown had recaptured the regimental guidon from the French during the battle

King George II Knighting Trooper Brown After the Battle of Dettingen by J P Beadle.
Half Price! - £30.00
After Edward 1st proclaimed himself King of Scotland Sir William Wallace rallied Scots in the South West and began attacking English occupying forces around Scotland. Edward I ordered the Earl of Surrey to put down the rebellion, after taking the surrender of rebel forces at Irvine the Earl of Surrey marched against William Wallaces forces at Stirling. He ordered his army to cross the narrow bridge over the Forth River near the Abbey of Cambuskenneth on September 11th. From a vantage point overlooking the bridge William Wallace watched and waited until the English army of 5,000 had crossed Stirling bridge and with the bridge being crowded with troops he launched his attack with his entire force wiping out the entire bridgehead. The rest of the English army fell back but William Wallace pursued. After this defeat English forces were evacuated south as far as the River Tweed.

The Battle of Stirling Bridge by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £70.00
 The Battle of Ulundi took place at the Zulu capital of Ulundi on 4th July 1879. Ulundi became the last battle to be fought during the Zulu war and the British victory finally broke the military power of the Zulu Nation. The battle began at 6 a.m. when Buller led out an advance guard of mounted troops and South African irregulars. The British force comprised of five companies of the 80th regiment in square in four ranks, with two Gatling Guns in the centres, two 9-pounders on the left flank and two 7-pounders on the right. The 90th Light Infantry with four companies of the 94th regiment made up the left face with two more 7-pounders. On the right face were the 1st Battalion of the 13th Light Infantry, four companies of the 58th Regiment, two 7-pounders and two 9-pounders. The rear face was composed of two companies of the 94th Regiment and two companies of the 2nd Battalion of the 21st Regiment. In the middle of the square were headquarters staff, No. 5 company of the Royal Engineers whhich was led by Lt John Chard who had commanded the troops at Rorkes Drift, the 2nd Native Natal Contingent, fifty wagons and carts with reserve ammunition and hospital wagons. Bullers horsemen protected the front and both flanks of the square. A rearguard of two squadrons of the 17th Lancers and a troop of Natal Native Horse followed. In total the British force stood at just over 5300 against the Zulu warrior regiments in total over 15000. The Zulu warriors charged again and again at the square but with the strong British firepower of tifle and gatling gun, they could not get close. As the Zulu warriors strength weakened, Lord Chelmsford ordered the cavalry to mount, and the 17th Lancers and the 1st Kings Dragoon Guards along with colonial cavalry were ordered to charge the now fleeing Zulus. The Zulus fled towards the high ground with the cavalry in pursuit. The Lancers were checked at the Mbilane stream by the fire of a concealed party of Zulus, causing a number casualties before the 17th Lancers overcame the Zulu resistance. The pursuit continued until not one living Zulu remained on the Mahlabatini plain, with members of the Natal Native Horse, Natal Native Contingent and Woods Irregulars slaughtering the Zulu wounded, done in revenge for the massacre at Isandlwana.

The Death or Glory Boys by Bud Bradshaw. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00
The Duke of Cumberland, their colonel, commanding the allied forces; measured his strength with Marshal Saxe, who was then besieging Tournay.  The First Guards were on the right of the centre, in the first line, when the Duke, furious at the failure on both wings, ordered the masses of troops to attack.  The infantry dashed forward between the village and the redoubt, and as the British Guards advanced over a low ridge, and saw the French Guards before them, a scene occurred which has become legendary in military history. 'Messieurs les Anglais, tirez les premiers!' is a phrase that bespeaks the old fashioned chivalry with which foemen worthy of each other's steel loved to treat one another.  The story of what occurred is variously given.  'The officers of the English Guards,' says Voltaire, 'when in the presence of the enemy, saluted the French by taking off their hats.  The Comte de Chabannes, and the Duc de Biron, who were in advance returned the salute, as did all the officers of the French Guards.  Lord Charles Hay of the King's Company, 1st Guards, stepped forward and took off his hat.  Lord Charles Hay then pulled out a flask and drank a toast to the French, saying: 'Gentlemen of the French Guard, I hope you will wait for us today and not escape by swimming the Scheldt as you swam the Main at Dettingen.'  Then he turned to his Company and said: 'Men of the King's Company, these are the French Guards and I hope you are going to beat them today.'  Count D'Anteroche, lieutenant of grenadiers, replied in a loud voice:  'Gentlemen, we never fire first; we will follow you.'  The French troops opened fire first but most of their shots went high.  Then the British troops opened fire and nineteen officers and up to 600 men of the French Guards are said to have fallen at the first discharge, as the English pushed on, the enemy were borne back, and in the face of a terrific fire, the Guards drove them into their camp. Here, exposed to the tremendous reverse fire of the redoubt of Eu, the Guards according to Rousseau, formed themselves into a kind of square, and resisted repeated attacks of the cavalry of the French Guards and Carabineers.  But unsupported and decimated by the withering hail of iron that assailed them, attacked by fresh troops and the Irish brigades of Clare and Dillon, beset as in a fiery furnace, the Guards at length began to retire.  They did so in perfect order; but the First Guards left 4 officers, 3 sergeants and 82 men dead on the field, besides having 149 wounded in all.  It was a defeat due to bad generalship and want of cohesion among allies, but its sanguinary episodes added new lustre to the great fame of the Guards. 'There are things, 'says Marshal Saxe, - or some say his friend General D'Heronville, in his Trait des Legions - 'which all of us have seen, but of which our pride makes us silent because we well know we cannot imitate them.'  Fontenoy was a defeat for the British army.  During the battle Lord Charles Hay was wounded but would later be in action again.

The Battle of Fontenoy by Felix Philippoteaux.
Half Price! - £33.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket