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DHM2612. Battleship Bismarck by Simon Atack. <p> With her raked bo proudly slicing through the morning swell of Norwegian waters, the mighty 41,000 ton battleship Bismarck leads her consort, the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, with destroyers Z10, Z16 and Z23 among her escorts, into the approaches to Korsfjord near Bergen, at 0800hrs on 21st May 1941.  Aboard, Bismarcks captain Ernst Lindemann was plotting a voyage that was to result in one of the greatest epics in the annals of naval warfare.  As they steam towards Grimstadtfjord, an Arado Ar196A-2 floatplane gives a fly-by salute to the flotilla, this aircraft serving with I./Bordfliegerstaffel 195 which, together with 5./196 was responsible for providing aircraft for German naval vessels.  Operated by Luftwaffe crews, and affectionately known as Eyes of the Fleet, the Arado 196 was specially designed for shipboard operation - with an airframe sturdy enought to withstand the rigours of catapult launching it was a highly effective armed Recce aircraft.  Bismarck carried no fewer than four Arado 196 floatplanes, one always at readiness on the catapult, with three hangared aft of the funnel.  As she sailed, a reconnaissance Spitfire had spotted Bismarcks movements and the British Home Fleet were alerted.  The old battlecruiser Hood and new battleship Prince of Wales were despatched north-west from Scapa Flow to join the cruisers Norfolk and Suffolk in the Denmark Strait for a possible interception.  And the rest is history: as Bismarck entered the Denmark Strait the two forces met.  Hood, pride of the Royal Navy, received a direct hit in the ammunition magazin by a shell from Bismarck and sank so quickly that only three of her crew survived.  Stunned by such severe loss, Churchill ordered the Bismarck to be sunk at all cost.  Hunted down by the Home Fleet, with her rudder damaged and unable to steer, Bismarck was reduced to a mass of twisted steel by British naval gunfire, finally rolling over and sinking at 10.45 in the morning of the 27th of May.  Thus ended one of the most compelling sea chases in naval history. The magnificent German battleship Bismarck at the outset of her final voyage, just five days before her fateful encounter with the British Home Fleet in the north Atlantic, May 1941. <b><p> Signatories: <a href=profiles.php?SigID=489>Maschinenobergefreiter Otto Peters</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=490>Unteroffizier Heinrich Kuhnt (deceased)</a> <br>and <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=491>Matrosengefreiter Willi Treinis (deceased)</a>. <p> Signed limited edition of 500 prints, with 3 signatures. <p> Print paper size 31 inches x 23.5 inches (79cm x 60cm)
SA2.  Escort to the Scharnhorst by Simon Atack. <p> When the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau entered Brest in March, 1941, between them they had sunk a total of 22 ships during their North Atlantic operations. Laying in port however, they became a target for constant air attack, Scharnhorst being damaged by bombs, and in February 1942 the decision was made to break out with the famous Channel Dash. Scharnhorst led the flotilla in a daring passage through the English Channel, heading for the sanctuary of Wilhelmshaven. They all got through but, striking two mines en-route, it was March 1943 before the Scharnhorst was able to resume battle operations when, under heavy escort, she sailed for Norway. Simon Atacks panoramic seascape depicts a scene from Operation Paderborn as Scharnhorst ploughs through a lively swell with Fw190s of I./JG5, based at Oslo Fornebu, providing fighter cover. Steaming in company with destroyers Z-28 and Erich Steinbrinck, the mighty German battleship has departed Gotenhafen and is heading towards Bogen Bay, near Narvik in Norway. But Scharnhorsts days were numbered. On 26 December 1943 the huge battleship attacked a convoy off North Cape, but in the heavy seas Scharnhorst became detached from her destroyer escort. With the British Home Fleet aware of her position, and intentions, she was intercepted, the Britishbattleship Duke of York landing a barrage of 14-inch shells on the mighty German warship. The blows were fatal, the coup-de-grace coming shortly after, when 11 torpedoes sent the magnificent but deadly battleship quickly to the bottom. There were just 36 survivors. <p><b>Last 8 copies available of this sold out edition.</b><b><p> Signed by <a href=profiles.php?SigID=492>Matrosen Obgefreiter Wilhelm Alsen.</a> <p> Signed limited edition of 500 prints. <p> Paper size 30 inches x 22.5 inches (76cm x 57cm)

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  Website Price: £ 180.00  

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Pack 257. Pack of two German Naval Battleship prints by Simon Atack.

PCK0257. Pack of two WW2 German Naval art prints by Simon Atack depicting Bismarck and Scharnhorst.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM2612. Battleship Bismarck by Simon Atack.

With her raked bo proudly slicing through the morning swell of Norwegian waters, the mighty 41,000 ton battleship Bismarck leads her consort, the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, with destroyers Z10, Z16 and Z23 among her escorts, into the approaches to Korsfjord near Bergen, at 0800hrs on 21st May 1941. Aboard, Bismarcks captain Ernst Lindemann was plotting a voyage that was to result in one of the greatest epics in the annals of naval warfare. As they steam towards Grimstadtfjord, an Arado Ar196A-2 floatplane gives a fly-by salute to the flotilla, this aircraft serving with I./Bordfliegerstaffel 195 which, together with 5./196 was responsible for providing aircraft for German naval vessels. Operated by Luftwaffe crews, and affectionately known as Eyes of the Fleet, the Arado 196 was specially designed for shipboard operation - with an airframe sturdy enought to withstand the rigours of catapult launching it was a highly effective armed Recce aircraft. Bismarck carried no fewer than four Arado 196 floatplanes, one always at readiness on the catapult, with three hangared aft of the funnel. As she sailed, a reconnaissance Spitfire had spotted Bismarcks movements and the British Home Fleet were alerted. The old battlecruiser Hood and new battleship Prince of Wales were despatched north-west from Scapa Flow to join the cruisers Norfolk and Suffolk in the Denmark Strait for a possible interception. And the rest is history: as Bismarck entered the Denmark Strait the two forces met. Hood, pride of the Royal Navy, received a direct hit in the ammunition magazin by a shell from Bismarck and sank so quickly that only three of her crew survived. Stunned by such severe loss, Churchill ordered the Bismarck to be sunk at all cost. Hunted down by the Home Fleet, with her rudder damaged and unable to steer, Bismarck was reduced to a mass of twisted steel by British naval gunfire, finally rolling over and sinking at 10.45 in the morning of the 27th of May. Thus ended one of the most compelling sea chases in naval history. The magnificent German battleship Bismarck at the outset of her final voyage, just five days before her fateful encounter with the British Home Fleet in the north Atlantic, May 1941.

Signatories: Maschinenobergefreiter Otto Peters,
Unteroffizier Heinrich Kuhnt (deceased)
and
Matrosengefreiter Willi Treinis (deceased).

Signed limited edition of 500 prints, with 3 signatures.

Print paper size 31 inches x 23.5 inches (79cm x 60cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

SA2. Escort to the Scharnhorst by Simon Atack.

When the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau entered Brest in March, 1941, between them they had sunk a total of 22 ships during their North Atlantic operations. Laying in port however, they became a target for constant air attack, Scharnhorst being damaged by bombs, and in February 1942 the decision was made to break out with the famous Channel Dash. Scharnhorst led the flotilla in a daring passage through the English Channel, heading for the sanctuary of Wilhelmshaven. They all got through but, striking two mines en-route, it was March 1943 before the Scharnhorst was able to resume battle operations when, under heavy escort, she sailed for Norway. Simon Atacks panoramic seascape depicts a scene from Operation Paderborn as Scharnhorst ploughs through a lively swell with Fw190s of I./JG5, based at Oslo Fornebu, providing fighter cover. Steaming in company with destroyers Z-28 and Erich Steinbrinck, the mighty German battleship has departed Gotenhafen and is heading towards Bogen Bay, near Narvik in Norway. But Scharnhorsts days were numbered. On 26 December 1943 the huge battleship attacked a convoy off North Cape, but in the heavy seas Scharnhorst became detached from her destroyer escort. With the British Home Fleet aware of her position, and intentions, she was intercepted, the Britishbattleship Duke of York landing a barrage of 14-inch shells on the mighty German warship. The blows were fatal, the coup-de-grace coming shortly after, when 11 torpedoes sent the magnificent but deadly battleship quickly to the bottom. There were just 36 survivors.

Last 8 copies available of this sold out edition.

Signed by Matrosen Obgefreiter Wilhelm Alsen.

Signed limited edition of 500 prints.

Paper size 30 inches x 22.5 inches (76cm x 57cm)


Website Price: £ 180.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £350.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £170




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


The signature of Maschinenobergefreiter Otto Peters

Maschinenobergefreiter Otto Peters
*Signature Value : £45 (matted)

Born 8th May 1919, Otto Peters joined the Kriegsmarine in April 1939. Posted to Bismarck, he was one of the first to join the crew at the Blohm and Voss shipyard in his hometown of Hamburg. As a leading stoker, Otto was on fire-watch when he heard over the tannoy that the Royal Navy had “undertaken all necessary efforts to sink the Bismarck”, and recalls that he knew at once their days were numbered. Otto was picked up after the sinking by the Cruiser HMS Dorsetshire, there were just 115 survivors from the crew of over 2000.


The signature of Matrosengefreiter Willi Treinis (deceased)

Matrosengefreiter Willi Treinis (deceased)
*Signature Value : £40 (matted)

Born 9th February 1922, Willi was called up into the Kriegsmarine in 1940. After the training he was posted to join his first, and only ship, the Bismarck, where he served in the ship’s 15 cm artillery and ammunition magazine, until she was sunk on 27th May 1941. One of a tiny handful of men from the magazines to survive to survive, Willi spent the remainder of the war as a POW.


The signature of Unteroffizier Heinrich Kuhnt (deceased)

Unteroffizier Heinrich Kuhnt (deceased)
*Signature Value : £40 (matted)

Born 22nd April 1917, Heinrich joined the cruiser Karlsruhe in July 1937, and served on her until she was put out of action by the submarine HMS Truant in Kristians and Fjord. He was immediately sent to join the Bismarck, serving as a Petty Officer in the turbine room, and with Otto Peters he was picked up by the cruiser HMS Dorsetshire. He remained in captivity until the end of the war. Heinrich Kuhnt was at his battle station, the Portside Turbine Compartment, during Bismarck's final fight on 27th May 1941. Kuhnt participated in the planting of scuttling charges on the cooling water intakes before abandoning the Bismarck. Kuhnt was one one of the 25 sailors rescued by the destroyer, HMS Maori. He was imprisoned in England for almost a year then sent to Canada. He remained there until the end of the war. After the war Heinrich Kuhnt started working for the Max Mueller Company until retiring in 1980. Heinrich Kuhnt sadly died on the 11th of July 2010 in Hannover at the age of 93 years.
Signatures on item 2
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


The signature of Matrosen Obgefreiter Wilhelm Alsen

Matrosen Obgefreiter Wilhelm Alsen
*Signature Value : £25 (matted)

Willi Alsen joined the Kriegsmarine on 1 October 1940, his first ship was the cruiser Koln. On 1 March 1941 he was posted to join the battleship Scharnhorst and as a Seaman 1st class he was one of the ship's starboard gunners, serving a 2cm four-barrel anti-aircraft gun. He was also trained as an aircraft recognition specialist. During his service he was awarded the Iron Cross II class. Willi Alsen was the last of the thirty-six men who survived the sinking of the Scharnhorst to be rescued. He served the remainder of the war as a Prisoner of War.
Artist Details : Simon Atack
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Simon Atack


Simon Atack

Although Simon became a full-time artist after leaving the RAF in 1985, he first began painting when his mother bought him a box of oil paints and an easel when he was just six years of age! He cannot recall a time when he was not painting in the intervening years, all the time honing his drawing and painting skills whilst accepting commissions from various Commanding Officers! Simon learned to fly, soloing in a Piper Tomahawk, experience which, he believes, gives him an empathy and feel for aircraft and aircrew you could not get in any other way. Unlike just about any other professional military artist, Simon is almost as much at home on the sea as in the air. His maritime-based paintings reflect his personal knowledge of the sea, ships and the often-unpredictable marine environment. Researching new aircraft and concepts for his next painting, and then getting stuck into the actual painting of a new picture he has first to see in his head, is what really excites and motivates Simon and he wouldn’t have it any other way. Now firmly established as one of the top aviation artists in the world, collectors are always eagerly awaiting Simon’s original paintings and Limited Edition Prints. Simon works from his studio in the beautiful county of Buckinghamshire, England.

More about Simon Atack

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