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DHM1206.  Piper of the 51st Highland Division by Alan Herriot. <p>51st Highland Division enter Schiyndel, Netherlands 1944. <b><p> Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. <p> Image size 12 inches x 17 inches (31cm x 43cm)
DHM1207.  Piper of the 92nd Highlanders at Waterloo by Alan Herriot. <p>Sir Edward Barnes mustering the 92nd Highlanders, before the Battle of Waterloo. <b><p> Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. <p> Image size 12 inches x 17 inches (31cm x 43cm)

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Pack 220. Pack of two Scottish Piper art prints by Alan Herriot.

PCK0220. Pack of two Scottish Piper art prints by Alan Herriot, depicting pipers of the 51st Highland Division and 92nd Highlanders.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM1206. Piper of the 51st Highland Division by Alan Herriot.

51st Highland Division enter Schiyndel, Netherlands 1944.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 17 inches (31cm x 43cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM1207. Piper of the 92nd Highlanders at Waterloo by Alan Herriot.

Sir Edward Barnes mustering the 92nd Highlanders, before the Battle of Waterloo.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 17 inches (31cm x 43cm)


Website Price: 60.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost 130.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save 70




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Artist Details : Alan Herriot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Alan Herriot


Alan Herriot

Alan Herriot. Scottish historical artist and Sculptor, Alan graduated from Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art in 1974. Alan produced a range of paintings of Native American Indians and Scottish Pipers through the ages. This range of his superb paintings and art prints are only available direct form Cranston Fine Arts. Alan is also a world renowned sculptor and his sculptures portray characters from history, literature and legend. His sculptural pedigree can be traced back from Rodin, Eduard Lanteri and Alexander Carrick, Scott Sutherland to contemporaries such as Alistair Smart and Dr. Alistair Ross and David Annand. He has produced work for the major Heritage Conservation bodies, The National Trust for Scotland and Historic Scotland as well as for organisations and individuals in Britain and Ireland, Holland, France and Norway. His Ancient Mariner and Yankee Jack sculptures are sited at the Maritime Museum, Watchet, Somerset. The Highland Division Piper stands at the entrance to The House of Bruar, in Perthshire. HRH Prince Andrew the Duke of York unveiled a bronze memorial to Bamse, the WWII Norwegian sea dog at Montrose. He has recently completed a large equestrian bronze statue of King Robert the Bruce, to be sited in 2011 in The City of Aberdeen.

More about Alan Herriot

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