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DHM1193. Christmas Kiss - Albatros DV by David Pentland <p> Albatros DV piloted by Austro-Hungarian Ace Lt. Josef Kiss, Austrian Alps in December 1917. <b><p> Limited edition of 1150 prints.  <p>Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)
DHM1191. Alone in a Winter Sky - Fokker Triplane DR1 by David Pentland <p> Rittmeister Karl Bolle Commander Jasta 2 early 1918. <b><p> Limited edition of 1150 prints.  <p>Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)

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Pack 067. Pack of two World War One aviation prints by David Pentland.

PCK0067. Pack of two aviation art prints depicting World War One aircraft by David Pentland.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM1193. Christmas Kiss - Albatros DV by David Pentland

Albatros DV piloted by Austro-Hungarian Ace Lt. Josef Kiss, Austrian Alps in December 1917.

Limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM1191. Alone in a Winter Sky - Fokker Triplane DR1 by David Pentland

Rittmeister Karl Bolle Commander Jasta 2 early 1918.

Limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)


Website Price: £ 60.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £90.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £30




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Artist Details : David Pentland
Click here for a full list of all artwork by David Pentland


David Pentland

One of Europe's Leading Military and Aviation Artists, David Pentland has produced a wealth of Paintings for Cranston Fine arts, who are proud to have David as one of their leading Artists. As you browse down his wonderful work you may be interested to know that many of the Paintings are still available, and to a collector his work would certainly be a valuable addition. David's Paintings have gone up in value over the past 2 years, and have seen a growth in value of nearly 100%.



David with one of his original paintings in the originals gallery at Cranston Fine Arts, and at a print signing session with a print of one of his pencil drawings.

More about David Pentland

This Week's Half Price Art

With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge.  Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death.  With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete.
Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.

Battle of Bannockburn by Mark Churms. (M)
Half Price! - £50.00


Wildman Rescue by John Wynne Hopkins.
Half Price! - £65.00
 Below the vast bulk of the Zoo Bunker one of three giant Flak towers designed to defend Berlin from air attack, some remnants of the citys defenders gather in an attempt to break out of the doomed capital. Amongst which are troops from the 9th Fallschirmjager and Munchberg Panzer Divisions, including a rare nightfighting equipped Panther G of Oberleutnant Rasims Company, 1/29th Panzer Regiment.

Panther at the Zoo, Tiergarten, Berlin, 2nd May 1945 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The battle of Mons was the first major battle fought by the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) The BEF had advanced along a 20 mile front along the Mons canal, and were on there left flank of the French 5th army. But when the French army had been defeated at the Battle of the Sambre on the 22nd August, The British commander Sir John French agreed to hold his position until the morning of the 23rd. The BEF were attacked by the German First Army . The German infantry advance was repelled by the British infantry and sustained very large losses: the British lost 1600 killed or wounded. But with the French forces retreating the British forces had no alternative but to retreat also, and on the morning of the 24th of August they began retreating to the outskirts of Paris over a fourteen day period.

Retreat From Mons by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
Half Price! - £37.00

 Following the capture of Orel, the German High Command ordered General Heinz Guderians panzers to push on towards Mtsensk, Tuila and  Moscow. Alarmed at the situation Stalin deployed Major General Leyushenko to halt this advance. the battle was finally joined when when the 4th Panzer Division crossed the Lisiza stream at Kamenewo, pushing back the dug in defenders towards Mtsensk, but unaware they had entered a Soviet trap. at this point the T34s and KV1s of Colonel Katukovs 4th tank Brigade attacked from the woods on the Panzers left flank smashing the out gunned and weaker armoured PzIII tanks and half tracks. For the Germans the battle was a terrible shock, stalling their advance and an unexpected demonstration of Soviet armoured superiority.  During the battle Lt Lavrinienko, with his platoon of four T34s supported by three KV1s under Sgt Antonov knocked out eleven enemy tanks, plus a pair of artillery guns (squashed under the tracks of the KVs)  In his short two month career, Lt Lavinienko knocked out some fifty two enemy tanks!

Red Steel at Kamenewo, Mtsensk, Central Front, Russia, 6th October 1941 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
DHM1058GS.  Light Gun of the 19th Regiment Royal Artillery in action, Mount Igman, Bosnia, 30th August 1995 by David Rowlands.

Light Gun of the 19th Regiment Royal Artillery in action, Mount Igman, Bosnia, 30th August 1995 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
DHM308.  The Passage of the Bidassoa by Wellingtons Army, 7th October 1813 by J P Beadle.

The Passage of the Bidassoa by Wellingtons Army, 7th October 1813 by J P Beadle.
Half Price! - £30.00
Richard the Lionhearts tactical skills and military training played a substantial role in the capture of Acre in 1191 by the Crusaders. But Richard the Lionheart was ruthless and after the capture of the city he marched 2,700 Muslim soldiers onto the road of Nazareth and in front of the Muslim army positions, had them executed one by one.  But Richard the Lionheart was up against a great leader in Saladin and the crusades did not always go his way.  After he negotiated the Treaty of Jaffa with Saladin and secured the granting of special rights of travel around Palestine and in Jerusalem for Christian pilgrims, Richard the Lionheart started his journey back to England in 1192.  He was shipwrecked, and captured by the German Emperor Henry VI, only being released after a 150,000 mark ransom was paid.  This money was raised by taxes in England.

Richard I (The Lion Heart) During the 3rd Crusade by Chris Collingwood (P)
Half Price! - £7000.00
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