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Pinned Down (Highlanders Engage Boers) by John Farquharson


Pinned Down (Highlanders Engage Boers) by John Farquharson

Item Code : VAR0128Pinned Down (Highlanders Engage Boers) by John Farquharson - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 17 inches x 11 inches (43cm x 28cm)noneHalf
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Other editions of this item : Pinned Down (Highlanders Engage Boers) by john Farquharson VAR0128
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ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original watercolour. Size 20.5 inches by 13 inches (52cm x 33cm)none1600.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Artist Details : John Farquharson
Click here for a full list of all artwork by John Farquharson

John Farquharson

British military and landscape artist, likely to have been Scottish as most of his known paintings are of Scottish subjects. Among his paintings are Pinned Down painted in 1904, a Boer War scene depicting a Highland Regiment, likely to be the Seaforth Highlanders, and a Napoleonic Peninsula War scene of 1807, of the Seaforth Highlanders in the snow, and his landscape paintings included in 1914 The Tay and the Kings Pass above Dunkeld. All paintings known are watercolours.

More about John Farquharson

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