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All That Was Left of Them by Richard Caton Woodville


All That Was Left of Them by Richard Caton Woodville

Illustrates the scene at Modderfontein Farm where a squadron of the 17th lancers were pinned down by a large Boer force, and fought to the finish. Modderfontein Farm in the Eastern Cape, about 10 miles from Tarkastad, was the the battle on the 17th September 1901, between the 17th Lancers who had camped there, and General Jan Christiaan Smut's Boer Commandos. C squadron of the 17th Lancers lost 3 Officers and 35 troopers, a single action in which the 17th Lancers lost more men in one day than any other day, inclduing that of the infamous charge of the Light Brigade. Also killed that day were three gunners from the Royal Garrison Artillery. Another account states that out of 130 men, 29 were killed and 41 wounded. All Officers had been killed or wounded.
Item Code : DHM0008All That Was Left of Them by Richard Caton Woodville - This Edition
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Titles in this pack :
All That Was Left of Them by Richard Caton Woodville  (View This Item)
Frederick Roberts Receives the Surrender of the Main Boer Field Army Commander Piet Cronje at Paardeburg on 27th February 1900. by George Scott.  (View This Item)
My Brave Irish by Richard Caton Woodville  (View This Item)
Race for the Copje by G Douglas Giles  (View This Item)

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All That Was Left of Them by Richard Caton Woodville  (View This Item)
The Last Shot at Colenso by Richard Caton Woodville  (View This Item)
Jameson's Last Stand Battle of Doornkop 2nd January 1896 by Richard Caton Woodville  (View This Item)

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Other editions of this item : All That Was Left of Them by Richard Caton Woodville DHM0008
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ORIGINAL
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Original Lithograph circa 1904

SOLD (August 2010)
Image size 34 inches x 28 inches (86cm x 71cm)noneSOLD
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**Open edition print. (One copy reduced to clear)

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Artist Details : Richard Caton Woodville
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Richard Caton Woodville

WOODVILLE, Richard Caton Born London 1856; died there 1927. Woodville was the most prolific battle artist of the nineteenth and early twentieth century in Britain, producing countless oil paintings and drawings, many for the Illustrated London News. As was the case with several history painters of the Victorian period, he studied at Dusseldorf sometime with Wilhelm Camphausen, the great German military painter, and later in Paris. He experienced was first-hand in Albania and Montenegro towards the end of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, and later in Egypt during the war of 1882. During the latter conflict, he made numerous sketches and obtained photographs of the trenches at Tel-e-Kebir for his friend, the French military artist, Alphonse de Neuville (q.v.) who had been commissioned to paint a scene of the battle. The fruits of both their labours were shown at the Fine Art Society in 1883, Woodville, exhibiting The Moonlight Charge at Kassassin. In 1884, Woodville exhibited by Royal Command, another picture relating to the Egyptian War. The Guards at Tel-e-Kebir (Royal Collection). His first Royal Academy picture exhibited in 1879, was entitled Before Leuthen, Dec. 3rd, 1757. Thereafter, he was a frequent exhibitor at Burlington House, showing no less than 21 battle pictures, many dealing with contemporary events such as the Second Afghan War, Candahar (Private collection) and Maiwand; saving the Guns (Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool), the Zulu War - Prince Louis Napoleon in Zululand, and the Boer War - Lindley; Whitsunday 1900 (Oxfordshire Light Infantry Association), and Dawn of Majuba (Canadian Military Institute). He painted many historical recreations both in oil and water-colour including a series on famous British battles for the Illustrated London News. He depicted The Charge of the Light Brigade (Royal Collection, Madrid) and The Charge of the 21st Lancers at Omdurman (Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool), Blenheim, Badajos and several Waterloo pictures. During the Great War, he turned his talents to depicting the current events, three of which were exhibited at the Royal Academy. The 2nd Batt. Manchester Regiment taking six guns at dawn near St. Quentin (The Rings Regiment), Entry of the 5th Lancers into Mons (16th/5th Royal Lancers), and Halloween, 1914: Stand of the London Scottish on Messines Ridge (London Scottish Museum Trust) exhibited in the year of his death. During his life, he was the most popular artist of the genre and he was the subject of several articles in magazines and journals. He himself wrote some memoirs in 1914 entitled Random Recollections. He was deeply interested in the army and joined the Royal Berkshire Yeomanry Cavalry in 1879, staying with them until 1914 when he joined the National Reserve as a Captain.

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Bhurtpore, about a hundred miles South of Delhi, was a fortified city perched on a great mound. The walls of the fortress were built of mud, of immense thickness, and the round shot fired by artillery in those days simply buried themselves deeply in their sides. Following the murder of the rightful successor to the ruler of Bhurtpore, lawlessness and oppression prevailed in the region. The Governor General ordered the Bengal Army to restore order there.  One cavalry and two infantry divisions, with a powerful siege train of the Bengal Army marched towards the city. Then began the slow, methodical work of digging the parallels, emplacing the guns behind defensive parapets and bringing up and defending the massive quantity of ammunition that was required. In the rocky soil around Bhurtpore every European and Native soldier was employed in the hard work of digging these positions. The guns steadily pushed forward as new parallels were dug, until the breaching batteries were established no more than 250 yards from the fortress. On 18th January 1826 the final assault was made, and Bhurtpore was captured.  Gabions filled with earth protect the guns from enemy fire. Above these are laid fascines and sandbags. Bhurtpore's crumbling walls of dry mud, which the artillery has been bombarding night and day, can be glimpsed above the gun position. I have depicted an iron 24-pounder gun on its wooden platform. The piece of the gun would have been horizontal at this range. The NCO in charge of the gun is sighting it by looking along the piece. Two men with hand-spikes manhandle the bracket trail according to his instructions. This would have to be done each time the gun was fired. The solid round shot has been loaded and rammed home on its wooden sabot. After correctly laying the gun, the NCO will retire to the left rear and order the man holding the portfire to ignite the charge. A native lascar or Golundauze is replenishing the water bucket for the spongeman. In the background a bugler of the Bengal Artillery can be glimpsed in his red jacket. At far right is a soldier of HM's 59th Foot, which served in the trenches and took part in the assault.  In 1861 the Bengal Artillery was absorbed into the Royal Artillery.
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