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Solid Guitar by Wayne Brereton.


Solid Guitar by Wayne Brereton.

Item Code : NTR0113Solid Guitar by Wayne Brereton. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)none13.00

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This Week's Half Price Art

 This, my personal interpretation of the viking period attempts to highlight aspects of their rich and diverse culture. A superstitious and pagan society, their influence was felt far beyond their native Scandinavia. 1 . The upper background deals with their pagan worship and tales from their mythology. This is represented by Odin & Thor, their principal Gods along with the saga of Sigurd the Dragonslayer. 2. The dominant figure at the centre is Aegir, God of the Sea whose goodwill was all important to the seafaring Viking. The scene now comes into the real world of their ships and seamanship, expertise for which they had no peer. 3. The extension of their seafaring was to raid, trade and pillage foreign shores, resulting in colonisation and settlement, with scant respect for Christianity or the Church. They ventured still further, exploring the unknown world, this is suggested in the two lower corners. 4. In England, the only King to successfully rise up against these Norsemen was Alfred the Great, a Saxon, represented in the lower centre drawing his sword from a swamp. This symbolises the raising of his army from the marshes of Wessex. Their legacy remains with us today, in language and art.

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 Acting Assistant Commissary J.L. Dalton commissariat and transport department and colour sergeant F. Bourne, during the battle at the front wall about 6pm at Rorkes Drift. Frank Bourne was born  on the 27th April 1854  in Balcombe Sussex, when Bourne was 18 he joined the 24th Regiment in 1872, being promoted to Corporal in 1875 and Sergeant in 1878.  Sergeant Bourne was promoted to Colour Sergeant soon after the rgeiment arrived in Natal.  Colour Sgt bourne was part of B company whose job was to guard the hospital at Rorkes Drift.  Colour Sgt Bourne played a major role in keeping the defending troops effective.  Colour Sgt Bourne was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his role in the defence, and it is surprising that he was not awarded a Victoria Cross as 11 were awarded for the defence. Col Sgt Bourne retired form the army in 1907, but  joined again for WW1, serving in Dublin.  He was the last survivor of Rorkes Drift, passing away at the age of 91 on the 8th May 1945 by coincidence being VE day.

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The 16th Lancers were part of General Sir Harry Smith's army consisitng of the British and Bengali army of 12,000 men and 30 guns against the Sikh army of 30,000 men and 67 guns of Ranjodh Singh during the First Sikh War which was fought on the  28th January 1848 in the Punjab in the North West of India.  This painting depicts the 16th Lancers which were part of Brigadier Macdowell's brigade consisitng of the 16th Queen's Lancers, 3rd Bengal Light Cavalry and 4th Bengal Irregular Cavalry.  The 16th Lancers charged several times during the action, breaking a number of Sikh infantry squares and overrunning a battery of Sikh artillery.  The Lancers are shown wearing over their chapkas the white cotton cover which had been adopted for service in the tropics.

Charge of the 16th Lancers at the Battle of Aliwal by Mark Churms. (P)
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 Alexander the Greats Victory at Hydaspes River During the Macedonian conquests in 326BC at the tributary at Hydaspes (now Jhelem) of the Indus River, King Porus and his Indian army blocked Alexander the Greats advance with some 50,000 troops leaving 40,000, the bulk of his army, on the west bank of the river. Alexander the Great crossed the Indus river using makeshift pontoons with 14,000 picked cavalry and infantry. The following day he attacked the flank of King Porus position, after 8 hours of hard fighting, Alexander the Greats army routed the Indians, taking 9,000 prisoner including King Porus and killing 12,000. The Macedonian army lost 980 men and this was the last battle of the Asian conquest as Alexanders army rebelled and refused to go further.

Alexander the Greats Victory at Hydaspes River by Brian Palmer. (Y)
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 Lt Gonville Bromhead stands over Private Hitch, B Co. 2/24th. Rorkes Drift, front barricade

Plugging the Gap by Mark Churms. (P)
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 US Marines of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd RCT, 2nd Marine Division, supported by LVTs and tanks, take part in the successful but bloody assault on Betio Island, part of the Tarawa Atoll. Operation Galvanic as it was known became the first step on the island road to Japan itself.

Red Beach Two, Tarawa Atoll, 20th November 1943 by David Pentland. (GL)
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 Napoleon is shown taking leave of the Imperial Guard outside the Palace of Fontainbleau. With a dramatic final gesture, I cannot embrace you all but I shall embrace your General, and after General Petit, he kissed the eagle of the 1st Grenadiers whose bearer, Lieut Fortin covers his face. The officers at the right are representative of the Allied armies and are considerably less affected by the scene than the Frenchman.

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 Depicting Legio II Augusta, 1st Century AD, (showing a Legionary, Centurian and a Conucen Trumpeter)

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