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Blues Guitar by Wayne Brereton.


Blues Guitar by Wayne Brereton.

Item Code : NTR0111Blues Guitar by Wayne Brereton. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)none£13.00

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This Week's Half Price Art

 A Provisional IRA bomb left outside the Unionist Party Headquarters, exploded prematurely injuring several police, army and civilians. At the same time it devastated the recently repaired Grand Opera House and Europa Hotel.

Business as Usual, Glengall St, Belfast, December 1991 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Painted more as an important propaganda piece, than an historical painting, This painting shows Napoleon on a fine horse, in fact he crossed the Alps on a mule.

Bonaparte Crossing the Great Saint Bernards Pass, By Jacques Louis David (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 Wellington watches as his army retires from the battle field area of Quatrebras.

Wellington Leaving Quatre Bras for Waterloo by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £35.00
 British 15th Light dragoons (and Hussars) and 16th Light Dragoons engage the French 1st Provincial Chasseurs during the Peninsula War

Incident on the Peninsula by Chris Collingwood. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

The Battle of Hastings: While King Harold II  was defeating the Norse invasion at the battle of Stamford Bridge in the north, the Norman invasion led by the Norman Duke William landed in the south. A Norman force of 7,000 warriors sailed across the English Channel in 450 flat boats and landed at Pevensey in Sussex on September 28th. The following two weeks saw the Norman army organising and raiding the local area for supplies. On hearing of the invasion, King Harold marched south from York to London, a distance of 200 miles, in seven days. And on October 13th with his army of 7,000 men took up position on Senlac Hill, 8 miles north of Hastings. Harold took this position as this was the direct route for London. The following day, the Normans attacked the village (which is now the town of Battle). The Battle of Hastings was a battle between King Harolds infantry and the Norman cavalry and archers. The Saxon line threw back the first charge of Norman knights and as the knights began retiring, the Saxons began to pursue the cavalry but a counter attack by Williams disciplined knights cut down the Saxon infantry. King Harold reformed his line before the second Norman cavalry attack was launched. For many hours King Harolds Saxon infantry held their ground against the repeated cavalry charges, both sides suffered heavy losses. As the evening progressed the battle turned the Normans way, William feigned a withdrawal of his cavalry, the Saxon infantry again could not resist to break ranks and pursue the cavalry. Halfway down the hill Williams knights turned and charged the Saxon infantry. King Harold at this time was mortally wounded from an arrow in the eye and the victory was won by the Normans. Each side lost a quarter of their men and during the fighting William the Conqueror had three horses killed under him. Later he ordered the building of Battle Abbey on the battlefield. The way was clear to London and William the Conqueror was crowned King of England on Christmas day at Westminster Abbey.

Battle of Hastings by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
In August 1808 the 2nd battalion of the 95th Rifles were part of the expedition commanded by Sir Arthur Wellesley to Portugal and covered the landings at Mondego Bay.  On 15th August during a skirmish at Obidos, they had the distinction of firing the first shots of the Peninsular War against the French.  The Rifles were trained to think quickly and by themselves in dangerous situations, they were also taught to work and fight together in pairs while firing harassing and well aimed shots at the enemy.  The Baker rifle which the 95th used was an accurate weapon for its day, with reported kills being taken up to 270 metres away.  During the Peninsular War, Rifleman Thomas Plunkett of the 1st Battalion, 95th Rifles, shot the French General Auguste-Marie-Francois Colbert at a range that may have been even greater.  Rifleman Thomas Plunkett then shot a second French officer who rode to the general's aid.

Tribute to the 95th Rifles by Chris Collingwood. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
Richard Duke of Gloucester (later Richard III), after the Battle of Tewkesbury, 4th May 1471. Banners are of Richard Duke of Gloucesters White Boar and Sir John Stafford Of Mordaunts (created Earl of Wiltshire by Edward IV) coat of arms.

Richard III by Chris Collingwood (P)
Half Price! - £7000.00
The Old Guard being asked to surrender at the end of the Battle of Waterloo.
The Last Stand of the Old Guard by Robert Hillingford.
Half Price! - £23.00
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