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Blues Guitar by Wayne Brereton.


Blues Guitar by Wayne Brereton.

Item Code : NTR0111Blues Guitar by Wayne Brereton. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)none£13.00

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This Week's Half Price Art

 The Battle at Rorke's Drift, also known as the Defence of Rorke's Drift, was an action in the Anglo-Zulu War.  The defence of the mission station of Rorke's Drift, under the command of Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, immediately followed the British Army's defeat at the Battle of Isandlwana on 22nd January 1879, and continued into the following day, 23rd January.  150 British and colonial troops successfully defended the garrison against an intense assault by approximately 2000 Zulu warriors.  The intense and noisy Zulu attacks on Rorke's Drift came very close to defeating the tiny garrison, but were ultimately repelled by blasts of Martini-Henry rifle fire-and some smart bayonet work-with  some guts behind the bayonet thrusts!  Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to the defenders, along with a number of other decorations and honours.  Of particular note in the painting is the dog 'Pip' - he survived Isandlwhana by retreating along the fugitive's trail to Rorke's Drift.  During the Zulu attacks on Rorke's drift, Pip did his part in the defence - by jumping on the mealie bag parapets and barking at Zulus- who were hiding in the long grass and sneaking up to the defences, then biting any Zulu who came within range.  Unfortunately Pip was not officially recognised for his part in the action.  He was not awarded a VC, on the basis that he was a volunteer canine that accompanied an officer, rather than a War Office issued canine.  Conversely, if Pip had been killed, then he would not have been officially listed as a casualty, as he accompanied the army in a strictly private capacity.  British army horses were in a different category as they were War Office issue, therefore the loss of a horse in action, or to disease, carried a financial liability for the War Office.

The Defence of Rorke's Drift by Jason Askew. (GM)
Half Price! - £300.00
 French civilians being questioned by Prussian officers with Prussian Cuirassiers during the Franco-Prussian War.
The Hostages by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
Half Price! - £20.00
 Captain F Macbeans Company, 1st Battalion Royal Artillery in action on the right of the British line, firing its 12 pounder guns against French Cavalry and Infantry. By permission of David Rowlands.  Battle of Minden  1st August 1759.  Major battle of the Seven years war.  After the French victory in April at Bergen, The French Army 60,000 strong under the command of Duc Louis de Contades marched northwards towards Hanover.   To block this French Advance the Prussian Army under Field Marshall The Duke of Brunswick decided to hold the line at Minden.  The Duke of Brunswick could only raise a force of 45,000 men including a British Contingent under Lord George Sackville of 6 regiments, a detachment of cavalry and some artillery.   The French opened the battle attacking,  the British Infantry regiments probably due to a misunderstanding, advanced and they were followed by the Hanoverian Infantry.  They attacked the French cavalry.  The Infantry advanced only stopping to let off a volleys of fire.  This unconventional use of Infantry against cavalry, the French force confused and suffering losses broke.  The victory was in Ferdinands grasp, he ordered his cavalry forward but the British general Sackville refused to send his cavalry after the French. For this action he was later court-martialled by King George II and cashiered from the army.  The French were able to withdraw in order, but their losses had been 7,000 men and 43 artillery guns.   The British and Hanoverian losses were less than 3,000 with 1500 of these casualties inflicted on the British Infantry.  This battle ended all French hopes of capturing Hanover.  British Regiments at Minden. 12th of Foot. (Suffolk Regiment)  20th Foot. (Lancashire Fusiliers ) 23rd of Foot. (Welch Fusiliers),  25th of Foot, (Kings own Scottish Borderers), 37th of Foot. (Royal Hampshire Regiment),  51st Foot   (Kings own Yorkshire Light Infantry)

The Battle of Minden, 1st August 1759 by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
DHM622GS. M109 Guns of the 40th Field Regiment Royal Artillery Approaching the Basra Road, Kuwait, 28th February 1991 by David Rowlands.

M109 Guns of the 40th Field Regiment Royal Artillery Approaching the Basra Road, Kuwait, 28th February 1991 by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

GDHM3020GL.  The Action at Wadi Adad, 19th March 1965. Lt Martin Proudlock winning the Military Cross with pack Howitzers of 28 Battery 19th Regiment RA. by David Rowlands.
The Action at Wadi Adad, 19th March 1965. Lt Martin Proudlock winning the Military Cross with pack Howitzers of 28 Battery 19th Regiment RA. by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Showing William III in full Black Armour at the time of the Battle of Boyne.

William III by Chris Collingwood (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
 After almost two months of continuous fighting in the front line, remnants of the 12th SS Panzer Division, Hitler Jugend, fall back under incessant air attacks by allied fighter bombers for their final battles in France. In their defense of the northern flank of what is to become the Falaise Gap the new Jagdpanzer IV in particular is to prove a formidable foe to the attacking British and Canadian tanks.

The Falaise Gap, Normandy, 12th - 20th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £330.00


Confederate Infantryman of the 19th Virginia by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £48.00
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