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Timber Drag by David Weston.


Timber Drag by David Weston.

The scene typifies a part of the English rural tradition common until the coming of steam power and then the internal combustion engine when the old crafts of the forest finally disappeared for good.
Item Code : WX0011Timber Drag by David Weston. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.

Image size 16 inches x 24 inches (41cm x 61cm)none24.00

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All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Artist Details : David Weston
Click here for a full list of all artwork by David Weston

David Weston

David Weston - British artist born in Leicester in 1935, he was educated at Alderman Newtons School. His professional career as an artist commenced in 1969 following Davids successful exhibition in London at the British Transport Museum David Westons work and reputation is recognised nationally with a professional career that spans over forty years. David has worked in both Oil and watercolour and a majority of his paintignds reflect his love for the British Landscapes and its history, architecture and industrial past is a defining feature of his work. Coal mining, steel production and especially railways have always been favourite subjects and it is David Westons Railway art prints we feature here. In the 1970s David undertook a series of 24 large canvasses commissioned by industrialist Sir William McAlpine on the history of the British steam locomotive took three and a half years to produce and enjoyed a prestigious launch at Londons Royal Exchange in 1977 where it was shown on television and caught the eye of His Royal Highness Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh. In 2009 David Weston celebrated his fortieth year as a professional artist. During that time he has been the subject of two television documentaries about his work including a 45 minute programme in 1984 by Central TV called Beware of Trains which was transmitted as part of the series England Their England. His work has also been featured in countless other television programmes throughout the country. We are very privilged to offer this superb selection of railway art prints, some of which are very rare to find.

More about David Weston

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