Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!

Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!


Product Search        

The Duchess of Hamilton by David Weston.

The Duchess of Hamilton by David Weston.

In 1989 David Weston was invited by the National Railway Museum to paint a picture recording the restoration in the Museums workshop of Staniers The Duchess of Hamilton.
Item Code : LW0001The Duchess of Hamilton by David Weston. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
PRINTSigned limited edition.

Image size 13 inches x 19.5 inches (33cm x 50cm)Artist : David Weston£55.00

All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Artist Details : David Weston
Click here for a full list of all artwork by David Weston

David Weston

David Weston - British artist born in Leicester in 1935, he was educated at Alderman Newtons School. His professional career as an artist commenced in 1969 following Davids successful exhibition in London at the British Transport Museum David Westons work and reputation is recognised nationally with a professional career that spans over forty years. David has worked in both Oil and watercolour and a majority of his paintignds reflect his love for the British Landscapes and its history, architecture and industrial past is a defining feature of his work. Coal mining, steel production and especially railways have always been favourite subjects and it is David Westons Railway art prints we feature here. In the 1970s David undertook a series of 24 large canvasses commissioned by industrialist Sir William McAlpine on the history of the British steam locomotive took three and a half years to produce and enjoyed a prestigious launch at Londons Royal Exchange in 1977 where it was shown on television and caught the eye of His Royal Highness Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh. In 2009 David Weston celebrated his fortieth year as a professional artist. During that time he has been the subject of two television documentaries about his work including a 45 minute programme in 1984 by Central TV called Beware of Trains which was transmitted as part of the series England Their England. His work has also been featured in countless other television programmes throughout the country. We are very privilged to offer this superb selection of railway art prints, some of which are very rare to find.

More about David Weston

This Week's Half Price Art

Battle of Assaye  23rd September 1803. Governor General Lord Richard Wellesley ordered his younger Brother General Arthur Wellesley (Later to become Duke of Wellington) to command a British and native force of  4,500 men to the South -Central part of the Peninsula. (At thr same time He also Sent General Gerard Lake to the north of India, see Battle fo Laswarree for further details)  General Arthur Wellesley, met a much larger Maratha Force of some 26,000 strong at Assaye in Hydrabad. on September 23rd 1803.  The Battle of Assaye became one of the bloodiest battle Arthur Wellesley fought, receiving 1500 casualties out of a force of 4,500. But the Maratha were routed and Assaye was a British Victory.

The Charge of the 19th Light Dragoons at Assaye by David Rowlands (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
 Sturmgeschutz IIIg and Paratroops of the 4th Fallschirmjager Division, driving to the front line, pass one of the two giant 28cm K5 (Eisenbaum) railway guns responsible for the shelling the Allied beacheads at Anzio and Nettuno.

Anzio Annie, Italy, 29th January 1945 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
The Duke of Cumberland, their colonel, commanding the allied forces; measured his strength with Marshal Saxe, who was then besieging Tournay.  The First Guards were on the right of the centre, in the first line, when the Duke, furious at the failure on both wings, ordered the masses of troops to attack.  The infantry dashed forward between the village and the redoubt, and as the British Guards advanced over a low ridge, and saw the French Guards before them, a scene occurred which has become legendary in military history. 'Messieurs les Anglais, tirez les premiers!' is a phrase that bespeaks the old fashioned chivalry with which foemen worthy of each other's steel loved to treat one another.  The story of what occurred is variously given.  'The officers of the English Guards,' says Voltaire, 'when in the presence of the enemy, saluted the French by taking off their hats.  The Comte de Chabannes, and the Duc de Biron, who were in advance returned the salute, as did all the officers of the French Guards.  Lord Charles Hay of the King's Company, 1st Guards, stepped forward and took off his hat.  Lord Charles Hay then pulled out a flask and drank a toast to the French, saying: 'Gentlemen of the French Guard, I hope you will wait for us today and not escape by swimming the Scheldt as you swam the Main at Dettingen.'  Then he turned to his Company and said: 'Men of the King's Company, these are the French Guards and I hope you are going to beat them today.'  Count D'Anteroche, lieutenant of grenadiers, replied in a loud voice:  'Gentlemen, we never fire first; we will follow you.'  The French troops opened fire first but most of their shots went high.  Then the British troops opened fire and nineteen officers and up to 600 men of the French Guards are said to have fallen at the first discharge, as the English pushed on, the enemy were borne back, and in the face of a terrific fire, the Guards drove them into their camp. Here, exposed to the tremendous reverse fire of the redoubt of Eu, the Guards according to Rousseau, formed themselves into a kind of square, and resisted repeated attacks of the cavalry of the French Guards and Carabineers.  But unsupported and decimated by the withering hail of iron that assailed them, attacked by fresh troops and the Irish brigades of Clare and Dillon, beset as in a fiery furnace, the Guards at length began to retire.  They did so in perfect order; but the First Guards left 4 officers, 3 sergeants and 82 men dead on the field, besides having 149 wounded in all.  It was a defeat due to bad generalship and want of cohesion among allies, but its sanguinary episodes added new lustre to the great fame of the Guards. 'There are things, 'says Marshal Saxe, - or some say his friend General D'Heronville, in his Trait des Legions - 'which all of us have seen, but of which our pride makes us silent because we well know we cannot imitate them.'  Fontenoy was a defeat for the British army.  During the battle Lord Charles Hay was wounded but would later be in action again.

The Battle of Fontenoy by Felix Philippoteaux (B)
Half Price! - £30.00
Themistocles had chosen the narrow waters at the entrance to the bay well. The Persians could not bring their larger fleet to bear on the smaller Greek fleet and due to the design and manoeuverability of the Greek Triremes, the Greek fleet sailed down the right channel next to Salamis and turned to ram the Persian fleet as it entered the bay. The Persian captains tried frantically to turn their ships but their oars became entangled and the turning manoeuvre caused the ships to run into each other. The Greek Triremes were able to ram the leading Persian ships, disengage and ram again. This was a great victory for Themistocles who lost only 70 ships from his fleet of 380 Triremes, compared to the loss of over 600 ships from the Persian fleet of over 1,000.

Battle of Salamis, 23rd September 480BC by Wilhelm von Kaulbach.
Half Price! - £33.00

DHM939.  The Charge of the French Cuirassiers at Reichshof by Adolphe Yvon.
The Charge of the French Cuirassiers at Reichshof by Adolphe Yvon.
Half Price! - £33.00
The Siege of Paris lasted from September 19th 1870 to January 28th 1871, and borught about the French surrender and the end of the Franco-Prussian War.
The Siege of Paris by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 Men of the US 381st Infantry Regiment, 96th Division supported by the tanks of 763rd and 713th Flamethrower Tank Battalions, during the assault on Yaeju Dake. This escarpment, known as Big Apple was the last in a series of tough Japanese defence lines on the south of the Island.

Taking of Big Apple, Okinawa, 10th - 14th June 1945 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00
 28th Gloucester Regiment shown in square repelling the French cavalry.

Quatre Bras by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
Half Price! - £31.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket