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The Canopus opening fire on Admiral Graf Von Spees Fleet from behind a tongue of land at the Falklands Islands.


The Canopus opening fire on Admiral Graf Von Spees Fleet from behind a tongue of land at the Falklands Islands.

When the fleet of Admiral Graf von Spee was about six miles off the Falkland Islands, and was rushing unawares into a deadly trap, the Canopus opened fire at the leading ships with her 12-inch guns from behind a tongue of land, which concealed her position. The enemy thereupon altered their course, turning slightly away. Soon afterwards, when as it seemed, they had detected the tripod masts of the great British cruisers behind the hills, they suddenly made a half turn to starboard.
Item Code : DTE0492The Canopus opening fire on Admiral Graf Von Spees Fleet from behind a tongue of land at the Falklands Islands. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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PRINT First World War antique black and white book plate published c.1916-18 of glorious acts of heroism during the Great War. This plate may also have text on the reverse side which does not affect the framed side. Title and text describing the event beneath image as shown.

Paper size 10.5 inches x 8.5 inches (27cm x 22cm)none13.00

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