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British Destroyers standing by the doomed cruiser Amphion to take off her crew.


British Destroyers standing by the doomed cruiser Amphion to take off her crew.

Having sunk the Konigin Luise, the Amphion and her destroyers continued their search in the North Sea. In the early morning if August 6th 1914, after making a detour to avoid mines, they approached the spot where the minelayer had first been seen. About 6.30 a.m. the dull thud of a mine explosion was suddenly heard beneath the fore part of the cruiser. A great mass of water was thrown high into the air, and almost at once a sheet of flame enveloped the bridge, rendering the captain insensible. Every man whom had not bee killed or wounded rushed to his post, and by the time Captain Fox had recovered his senses the whole of the fore part of the ship was on fire. As the destroyers closed in on the doomed vessel to pick up the survivors, the men were lined up on deck calmly awaiting orders. Of the Amphions crew. 131 officers and en were lost, besides many of the Germans rescued from the Konigin Luise.
Item Code : DTE0432British Destroyers standing by the doomed cruiser Amphion to take off her crew. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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PRINT First World War antique black and white book plate published c.1916-18 of glorious acts of heroism during the Great War. This plate may also have text on the reverse side which does not affect the framed side. Title and text describing the event beneath image as shown.

Paper size 10.5 inches x 8.5 inches (27cm x 22cm)none£13.00

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