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Second Lieutenant W. H. C. Buntine Attacking Hostile Aeroplanes, One Of Which Falls To The Ground Nose First.


Second Lieutenant W. H. C. Buntine Attacking Hostile Aeroplanes, One Of Which Falls To The Ground Nose First.

As escort to a bombing raid, Second Lieutenant Walter Horace Buntime, of the Notts and Derby Regiment and Royal flying Corps, attacked several hostile machines, one of which fell to the ground nose first.  Later three enemy machines attacked him, his own machine being damaged and severely wounded. With great skill he managed to land in the British lines, though most of his propeller was shot away and his machine otherwise much damaged. He was awarded the M.C. for his conspicuous gallantry and skill.
Item Code : DTE0835Second Lieutenant W. H. C. Buntine Attacking Hostile Aeroplanes, One Of Which Falls To The Ground Nose First. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT First World War antique black and white book plate published c.1916-18 of glorious acts of heroism during the Great War. This plate may also have text on the reverse side which does not affect the framed side. Title and text describing the event beneath image as shown.

Paper size 10.5 inches x 8.5 inches (27cm x 22cm)none£13.00

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