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Second Lieutenant G. G. Coury Assisting Men Digging A Communication Trench Under Intense Fire.


Second Lieutenant G. G. Coury Assisting Men Digging A Communication Trench Under Intense Fire.

During an advance Second Lieutenant Gabriel George Coury, of the South Lancashire Regiment, was in command of two platoons, which had been ordered to dig a communication trench, and his fine example kept up the spirits of his men, who completed the task under intense fire. Later, after his battalion had suffered severe casualties and the commanding officer had been wounded, he went out in front of the advanced position in broad daylight and brought him back over ground swept by machine gun fire. He also assisted in rallying the attacking troops and in leading them forward. He has been awarded the V.C. for his most conspicuous bravery.
Item Code : DTE0804Second Lieutenant G. G. Coury Assisting Men Digging A Communication Trench Under Intense Fire. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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PRINT First World War antique black and white book plate published c.1916-18 of glorious acts of heroism during the Great War. This plate may also have text on the reverse side which does not affect the framed side. Title and text describing the event beneath image as shown.

Paper size 10.5 inches x 8.5 inches (27cm x 22cm)none£13.00

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