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This Week's Half Price Art

The King's Regiment and the Atholl Brigade at the Battle of Culloden.  16 April 1746: At the Battle of Culloden the King's Regiment was on the extreme left flank of the Royal army. However, it was positioned en potence, at right angles to the line. The regiment was on rising ground, protected to some degree by the crumbling Leanach dyke, made of turf. The soldiers were in a position to open a deadly fire on the Highland right, should it make an attack. The Highlanders of the Atholl Brigade made a spirited charge, sword in hand, towards their right, and the King's Regiment opened a deadly flanking fire on the crowded mass of men. Wind and smoke blew towards the Highlanders. With bayonets fixed, and drawn up in three ranks, they were unable to miss at such close quarters. The officers carried spontoons, and sergeants, halberds. 
The Highlanders were mainly armed with old-fashioned muskets and powder horns, targes and broadswords.  King George I granted the regiment its title of The King's in 1716. It ranked in order of precedence as the 8th Regiment of Foot, and in 1746 was known as Wolfe's Regiment (named after its Colonel, Lieutenant-General Edward Wolfe).

The Battle of Culloden, 16th April 1746 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00


General Erwin Rommel with the Africa Korps before the Battle for Tobruk by Chris Collingwood. (P)
Half Price! - £7000.00
 Schneider CA1 Tanks of the French tenth army spearhead the successful counter offensive against the German army on the river Marne. Overhead a tenacious Junkers JI artillery spotter dogs their tracks. The Second Battle of the Marne, though not an overwhelming victory, spelt the end of German successes on the Western front, and a turning point for the allies.

Tanks on the Marne - France, 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
The term Panzergrenadier was applied equally to both the infantry section of the German Panzer Divisons and was also used for the new Panzergrenadier Divisions.  The German army Panzergrenadier Divisions initially came from existing infantry divisions but were the first Divisons to be motorised.  These included the 3rd, 10th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 18th, 20th, 25th, and 29th divisions.  During the war special elite regiments such as the Grosdeutchland Division were created.  The Waffen SS also produced a number of panzergrenadier regiments.  Many army and Waffen SS regiments were upgraded to Panzer divisions during the later stages of the war.  The Panzergrenadier division usually consisted of six battalions of truck-mounted infantry organized into either two or three regiments, also a battalion of tanks and artillery were included along with sections of anti-tank, anti-aircraft and combat engineers.  Panzer grenadier divisions were often equipped with assault guns - <i>Stugs</i>.  Panzergrenadier divisions had one tank battalion less than a Panzer division but strengthened with two more infantry battalions.  Of 226 panzergrenadier battalions in the whole of the German Army, Waffen SS  (and some in the Luftwaffe ) in September 1943, only 26 were equipped with armoured half tracks, the remaining Panzergrenadier divisions were equipped with trucks.

SS Panzer Grenadiers by Chris Collingwood. (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00

 The Medical Emergency Responce Team (MERT) picking up a casualty in Helmind Province, Afghanistan.  The armour plated RAF Chinook, protected by two Army Air Corps Apache helicopters, has a full complement of medical trauma personel onboard, as well as a protection force of RAF Regiment soldiers.

MERT Pick-Up by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Depicting troopers of the 2nd Royal North British Dragoons (Scots Greys) on the morning of 18th June 1815. before the Battle of waterloo, and their great charge into history.

The Dawn of Waterloo by Lady Elizabeth Butler (B)
Half Price! - £33.00
DHM807GS.  Assiniboin Warrior by Alan Herriot.

Assiniboin Warrior by Alan Herriot. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 St Mere Eglise, Normandy, 6th June 1944.  Anti-tank guns of 80th AA battalion and glider troops of 325th GIR, 82nd Airborne, land in the fields near St Mere Egise, during the early hours of D-Day.

Welcome Reinforcements by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £40.00
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