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The Story of the Hurricane.


The Story of the Hurricane.

Its eight wing-mounted Colt-Brownings spitting flame, the Hawker Hurricane swooped to dispatch over two thirds of all enemy aircraft destroyed in the Battle of Britain. Courageous squadron commander Douglas Bader, 14 - kill her Cobber Kain, Ginger Lacey - the top Battle of Britain ace with 18 victims - and many other RAF pilots owed their reputations and their lives to this toughest mount of all. The Hurricane was outnumbered but never outclassed, designed to hit the enemy hard, absorb tremendous punishment yet live to fight another day. Featuring colour footage of the last surviving aircraft, alongside original combat film, this is the definitive documentary of a fighter plane that truly changed the course of history.
Item Code : PVD1002BThe Story of the Hurricane. - This Edition
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Other editions of this item : The Story of the Hurricane.PVD1002
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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
HurricaneRoyal Air Force Fighter, the Hawker Hurricane had a top speed of 320mph, at 18,200 feet and 340mph at 17,500, ceiling of 34,200 and a range of 935 miles. The Hurricane was armed with eight fixed wing mounted .303 browning machine guns in the Mark I and twelve .303 browning's in the MKIIB in the Hurricane MKIIC it had four 20mm cannon. All time classic fighter the Hurricane was designed in 1933-1934, the first prototype flew in June 1936 and a contract for 600 for the Royal Air Force was placed. The first production model flew ion the 12th October 1937 and 111 squadron of the Royal Air Force received the first Hurricanes in January 1938. By the outbreak of World war two the Royal Air Force had 18 operational squadrons of Hurricanes. During the Battle of Britain a total of 1715 Hurricanes took part, (which was more than the rest of the aircraft of the Royal air force put together) and almost 75% of the Victories during the Battle of Britain went to hurricane pilots. The Hawker Hurricane was used in all theatres during World war two, and in many roles. in total 14,533 Hurricanes were built.

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