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This Week's Half Price Art

Flanked by his Companion heavy cavalry, Alexander, King of Macedon, led the charge which broke through the left wing of the Persian army, and forced Darius, the Great King, to flee the battlefield.  Persian success against his own left wing forced him to delay his pursuit of the routed troops, but by the end of the day the battle was won, and the heart of the Persian empire lay at his feet.

Alexander at Arbela, Plain of Gaugamela, Iraq, 331BC by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 As a prelude to the invasion of Europe, certain important targets were attacked by airborne forces. Among them the bridge over the Caen canal which would protect the allies left flank. Major John Howard (D Company Ox and Bucks Light Infantry) gliders achieved complete surprise and the bridge was taken in a matter of minutes. Ever after it has been known as Pegasus Bridge in honour of the airborne forces emblem.

Coup de Main, Pegasus Bridge, Normandy, 6th June 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Very few of the British soldiers made it through the barbed wire defences, and even fewer to the German trenches.  By the end of the first day the British losses were 60,000 men.

The Battle of the Somme - At the German Trenches by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - £3500.00
 On January 22nd 1879, during the Zulu War, the small British field hospital and supply depot at Rorkes Drift in Natal was the site of one of the most heroic military defences of all time. Manned by 140 troops of the 24th Regiment, led by Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, the camp was attacke by a well-trained and well-equipped Zulu army of 4000 men, heartened by the great Zulu victory over the British forces at Isandhlwana earlier on the same day. The battle began in mid afternoon, when British remnants of the defeat at Isandhlwana struggled into the camp. Anticipating trouble, Chard set his small force to guard the perimeter fence but, when the Zulu attack began, the Zulus came faster than the British could shoot and the camp was soon overcome. The thatched roof of the hospital was fired by Zulu spears wrapped in burning grass and even some of the sick and the dying were dragged from their beds and pressed into the desperate hand-to-hand fighting. Eventually, Chard gave the order to withdraw from the perimeter and to take position in a smaller compound, protected by a hastily assembled barricade of boxes and it was from behind this barricade that the garrison fought for their lives throughout the night. After twelve hours of battle, the camp was destroyed, the hospital had burned to the ground, seventeen British lay dead and ten were wounded. However, the Zulus had been repulsed and over 400 of their men killed. The Battle of Rorkes Drift is one of the greatest examples of bravery and heroism in British military history. Nine men were awarded Distinguished Conduct Medals, and eleven, the most ever given for a single battle, received the highest military honour of all, the Victoria Cross.

Defence of Rorkes Drift by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (C)
Half Price! - £40.00

On a dark winter evening, the Permanent Vehicle Check Point (PVCP) north of Rosslea, close to the border with Monaghan, was manned by 8 soldiers commanded by Corporal Robert Duncan.  In response to a threat to the border locations an additional 4-man team commanded by Corporal Ian Harvey was on external patrol.  From the direction of the border a specially armour-plated lorry, with about twelve terrorists intent on destroying the base stopped, and as Private Houston checked the back of it, automatic gunfire opened up from Armalite and AK47 rifles.  Grenades were thrown into the base, and a flame-thrower was aimed at the command sangar.  Two RPG7 Rockets were fired at the observation sangar.  Heavy suppressive fire continued as the lorry reversed and smashed its way into the compound.  Two soldiers were killed.  The truck drove out of the devastated PVCP, and a red transit van drove in, laden with explosives.  Fortunately only the booster charge exploded.  As the patrol came up rapidly, firing at the terrorists, the truck drove off at speed, its two machine-guns mounted on the rear firing, its driver intent on escape.  It was found abandoned at the border with a 210 kg bomb on board.  The scale and type of this attack had never been seen before in Northern Ireland.  Every soldier involved acted with exemplary courage and the determination to defeat the enemy.  The conduct of Corporals Duncan and Harvey was in the highest traditions of conspicuous gallantry.  Each received the Distinguished Conduct Medal.  The events of the Derryard Action are a landmark in the modern fighting history of the King's Own Scottish Borderers.  I was phoned soon after the action.  I flew to Belfast and was driven to the location.  In order to paint the action it was important to see the PVCP in its scarred condition, before it was repaired.  The lonely, isolated building put me in mind of the beleaguered little forts which dotted this part of Ireland in the time of Queen Elizabeth I.  The soldiers took up the positions they had fought in, while I sketched them in their Tam-o'-shanters.  Corporal Ian Harvey is in the foreground with Pte Maxwell.  Cpl Robert Duncan kneels in the road.
1st Battalion Kings Owns Scottish Borderers. The Derryard Action, Co Fermanagh, December 13th 1989 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
VAR144GS.  Battle of Mount Thabor, 16th April 1799 by Louis Lejeune.

Battle of Mount Thabor, 16th April 1799 by Louis Lejeune (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Captain Montague Lind, leading a Squadron of the 1st Life Guards against the 12th regiment of Cuirassiers during the battle of waterloo, Hougoumont Farm can be seen in the distance.

Charge of the Life Guards by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £75.00
 Sturmtigers of Sturmmorser Company 1002, commanded by Lieutenant Zippel, take on ammunition in preparation for the battle to come. These fearsome monsters 38cm rocket projectors could penetrate up to 2.5m of reinforced concrete. Luckily for the Allies only 18 were completed by the wars end.

Preparing for the Day, the Reichswald, February 1945 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00
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