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Coltishall - End of the Line by Michael Rondot.


Coltishall - End of the Line by Michael Rondot.

Life on the flightline at Royal Air Force Coltishall with the 41 Squadron engineering line building in the background. Coltishall was the last Royal Air Force station to operate three squadrons of aircraft from flightlines in front of squadron hangars and the last operational front-line former Battle of Britain fighter station.
Item Code : MR0064Coltishall - End of the Line by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 150 prints.

Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£75.00

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Other editions of this item : Coltishall - End of the Line by Michael Rondot. MR0064
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs with 9 signatures. Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm) Howe, John
Black, George
Harper, Chris
Wright, Graham
Dacre, Phil
Hewlett, Tim
Bryant, John
Macormac, Dick
Quick, Andy
+ Artist : Michael Rondot


Signature(s) value alone : £100
£120.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Extra Details : Coltishall - End of the Line by Michael Rondot.
About all editions :

A photo of the print :

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Jaguar
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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