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Charge and Pursue by Mark Churms.

Charge and Pursue by Mark Churms.

The Queens Bays engage enemy foot and horse outside Luknow, led by Major Percy Smith. The regiment was given the order to charge and pursue. The Bays thundered into action accompanied by the second Punjab cavalry. In the action Major Percy Smith was killed along with two corporals.
Item Code : DHM0361Charge and Pursue by Mark Churms. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1000 prints.

Image size 27 inches x 14 inches (69cm x 36cm)Artist : Mark Churms£40 Off!Now : £70.00


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Charge of the Queens Bays by Harry Payne.
for £110 -
Save £50

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2nd Dragoon Guards Officer by Mark Churms.
for £100 -
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Victorian India Military Art Pack.

Pack price : £160 - Save £140

Buy With :
3 other prints in this pack :

Pack price : £160 - Save £140

Titles in this pack :
2nd Dragoon Guards Officer by Mark Churms.  (View This Item)
Charge and Pursue by Mark Churms.  (View This Item)
Sikander Sahibs Yellow Boys by Mark Churms.  (View This Item)
Officer Skinners Horse 1905 by Mark Churms.  (View This Item)

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Other editions of this item : Charge and Pursue by Mark Churms. DHM0361
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 27 inches x 14 inches (69cm x 36cm)Artist : Mark Churms£70 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £105.00VIEW EDITION...
POSTCARD Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£2.00VIEW EDITION...
**Signed limited edition of 1000 prints. (4 copies reduced to clear)

Ex-display prints - near perfect condition.
Image size 27 inches x 14 inches (69cm x 36cm)Artist : Mark Churms£80 Off!Now : £40.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :

Artist Details : Mark Churms
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Mark Churms

Mark Churms

Mark was born in Wales in 1967. He gained his degree in Architectural Studies at Oxford Polytechnic in 1989, but soon his interest in drawing buildings was surpassed by his love of painting horses and in 1991 he began work as a freelance artist. His first commissions were for sporting subjects, Polo, Racing and Hunting. However his consuming passion for military history, particularly of the Napoleonic era, quickly became his dominant theme, with the invaluable counsel of French military experts (accuracy in uniform and terrain of the various battles takes a great deal of time and consultation with many experts across Europe). Mark Churms joined Cranston Fine Arts in 1991 and for a period of 8 years, was commissioned for several series and special commissions. His series of the Zulu War, and of the Battle of Waterloo were the highlights during this period. Mark Churms' deep understanding and detailed knowledge of the period made Mark at that time one of the most prolific and successfull artists for Cranston Fine Arts. Cranston Fine Arts are proud with their series of superb art prints and original paintings painted by Mark Churms in this period. We now offer Mark Churms art prints in special 2 and 4 print packs with great discounts as well as a number of selected original paintings at upto half price.

More about Mark Churms

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