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Last Review Before the Charge by Mark Churms.


Last Review Before the Charge by Mark Churms.

In the Spring of 1854 the Seventeenth lancers, the Death or Glory Boys, a nickname derived from the regiments dashingly sinister skull and crossbones badge received orders to make ready for the Crimea. The Seventeenth was to be brigaded with the 8th and 11th Hussars and the 4th and 13th Light dragoons to comprise what was said at the time to be The finest Brigade of Light cavalry ever to leave the shores of England. Prior to departure for the front. The seventeenth is reviewed by its Colonel in Chief, the Duke of Cambridge wearing scarlet full dress in contrast to the dark blue of the seventeenth. A bit of swagger before the Charge which would secure the regiments place in history.
Item Code : DHM0300Last Review Before the Charge by Mark Churms. - This Edition
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1000 prints.

Image size 24 inches x 16 inches (61cm x 41cm)Artist : Mark Churms£50 Off!
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Officer and Bugler, 17th Lancers, Balaclava by Chris Collingwood.
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Officer 17th Lancers, Balaclava 1854 by Mark Churms.
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Limited edition of 300 artist proofs. Image size 24 inches x 16 inches (61cm x 41cm)Artist : Mark Churms£25 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
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Artist Details : Mark Churms
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Mark Churms


Mark Churms

Mark was born in Wales in 1967. He gained his degree in Architectural Studies at Oxford Polytechnic in 1989, but soon his interest in drawing buildings was surpassed by his love of painting horses and in 1991 he began work as a freelance artist. His first commissions were for sporting subjects, Polo, Racing and Hunting. However his consuming passion for military history, particularly of the Napoleonic era, quickly became his dominant theme, with the invaluable counsel of French military experts (accuracy in uniform and terrain of the various battles takes a great deal of time and consultation with many experts across Europe). Mark Churms joined Cranston Fine Arts in 1991 and for a period of 8 years, was commissioned for several series and special commissions. His series of the Zulu War, and of the Battle of Waterloo were the highlights during this period. Mark Churms' deep understanding and detailed knowledge of the period made Mark at that time one of the most prolific and successfull artists for Cranston Fine Arts. Cranston Fine Arts are proud with their series of superb art prints and original paintings painted by Mark Churms in this period. We now offer Mark Churms art prints in special 2 and 4 print packs with great discounts as well as a number of selected original paintings at upto half price.

More about Mark Churms

This Week's Half Price Art

The second battle of Acre the Turkish Army of 60,000 horsemen and 100,000 foot soldiers laid siege to the city. Eventually the Marmalukes took the outer wall on May 15th and three days later stormed the inner gates, bursting into the city and most of the Christian defenders died fighting them. Acre was thoroughly destroyed and all fortifications demolished, May 18th 1291.

Guillaume de Clermont defending Ptolemais (Acre) 1291 by Dominque Louis.
Half Price! - £30.00
Battle of Prestonpans.  Bonnie Prince Charlie, after landing at Glenfinnan, in his bid to gain the British Throne.  Lord George Murray with an army of 2,000 Jacobites marched southward where they were meet  at Prestonpans by General  Sir John Cope and a Royal army of 3,000 men  On the 21st September.  The Jacobites charged the  government troops and routed them. hundreds of Government troops were killed or wounded and over 1,000 were captured. with the Jacobite losses less than 150.  With this victory Charles Edward Stuart and the Jacobite army marched southwards into England capturing the towns of Carlisle, Penrith, Lancaster and Preston and getting as far as Nottingham before lack of supplies and new recruits forced him to heads back to Scotland. Through the early morning Autumn mist, Highlanders of the Appin Regiment abandon their plaids and rush headlong across fields of stubble into the stunned ranks of Jonny Copes army. The force sent by the Crown to destroy the rebellion and capture the Pretender is itself utterly routed in a matter of minutes.  The first major engagement of the uprising is a swift and complete victory for the Princes men. Except for the garrisons of Edinburgh, Stirling, Fort William and Fort Augustus, Scotland is now under the control of the Jacobites.

The Charge of the Highlanders at the Battle of Preston Pans, by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £3500.00
 The Storming of the night of April 6th 1812 of Badajoz Castle proved to be Wellingtons bloodiest siege. Depicted here are soldiers of the 88th Connaught Rangers (famously the Devils Own) and part of Pictons 3rd Division, successfully escalading the high walls of the Castle.

Storming of Badajoz by Chris Collingwood (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
 Objective Brass, 26th February 1991.  At the forefront of the Fusiliers Battle Group throughout the land war was the Recce Platoon.  Once in the desert, it became part of the Reconnaissance Group which was formed to provide a force with an integral anti-tank capability.  Such a unit was able to act independently and defend itself, should the need arise.  The Recce Group was commanded by Major Corin Pearce.  4th Armoured Brigade attacked the enemy formations sequentially, and as the Battle Group paused on Objective COPPER SOUTH, the Reconnaissance Group moved forward to screen the formation and establish the Forming Up Position (FUP) for the forthcoming attack on Objective BRASS.  Corporal Derek McManus of The Queen's Own Highlanders in his CVR(T) Scimitar (callsign Two Three Alpha) encountered an Iraqi command bunker, and ordered an Iraqi to tell those inside to surrender.  The occupants refused, so McManus threw an L2A2 grenade into the doorway of the bunker.  With Corporal Dave Weaver, from his MCT(S) Spartan (callsign Four One Bravo), he moved forward on foot but came under fire from the Iraqi in a trench.  The Scimitar's 30mm Rarden cannon fired a sabot round and Corporal McManus fired his CLAW rifle grenade, but the fire from the trench continued so both he and Weaver rushed back to their vehicles.  With considerable presence of mind, Fusilier Anthony Cassar, the driver of callsign Four One Bravo, stood up in his hatch and fired his rifle, shooting the Iraqi soldier dead.  Captain Guy Briselden, the Milan Platoon Commander, led his men (almost all of whom were Queen's Own Highlanders) on foot to clear the enemy trench system, advancing by fire and movement.  He cleared several bunkers as he and the Highlanders moved through the extensive trench system, which the enemy had had many months to prepare, under the supporting fire of two Warriors.  Many Iraqis subsequently surrendered.  For his inspirational leadership in this exploit of arms Captain Briselden was awarded the Military Cross.

Reconnaissance Group Action, 3rd Fusiliers Battle Group by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

GITW6002GL. The Meeting of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn at Hampton Court by Daniel Maclise (1806-1870) .
The Meeting of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn at Hampton Court by Daniel Maclise (1806-1870) (GL)
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Cruiser Tanks of 1st Royal Tank Regiment at the Battle of Beda Fomm.  6th February 1941: My friend Lt Col G Vesey Holt RTR has always considered that the deeds of 1 RTR at Beda Fomm have been neglected. To put this right he commissioned me to do a painting which he then presented to his Regiment. He obtained copies of the Regiment's War Diary. I was also greatly assisted by the staff of the Tank Museum, Bovington, which has examples of these tanks on display. On 6th February 1941, a column of Italian tanks and transport vehicles was proceeding southwards along the Benghasi-Tripoli road. In the late afternoon, B squadron engaged the enemy at about 500 yards from a hull down position behind a ridge, while five or six Cruisers of A Squadron crossed the road and proceeded south amongst the Italian column, firing on the transport and guns. It was raining heavily and visibility was poor.  The scene was littered with burning wreckage of Italian M13 tank and lorries. At about 1720 hours visibility became so bad that it was almost impossible to distinguish between friend and foe, and the tanks withdrew to re-group. No British tank was destroyed, though one was left damaged.  A Squadron is indicated by the triangle on the turrets, (red for the senior regiment in the brigade). An A9 is closest, with an A10 beyond. Commanders were almost invariably visible with their hatches open. The pennants on the antenna were a recognition sign, worn at different heights which changed daily. The white circle on a red square was the sign of 7th Armoured Division. The regiment's unit code sign was a white 24 on a red square. At this period British tanks had the multi-coloured diagonally striped pattern of camouflage.  The Cruiser A9 (Mark 1) had one 2-pounder gun and one .303-in. Vickers machine-gun mounted co-axially in the main turret, and one .303-in. Vickers mg in each of the two auxiliary turrets.  The Cruiser A10 (Mark 1A) had one 2-pounder gun and two 7.92-mm Besa machine-guns.

The Battle of Beda Fomm by David Rowlands (GS)
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This is my personal interpretation of the events immediately following the Battle of Culloden. There is no intention to depict either the shores of LochNam-Uarnh, the Highlands, glens or castles with geographic accuracy. Instead I have tried to portray the scenes following the first 3 days of the battle, the escape of Bonnie Prince Charlie, the destruction and brutality wreaked upon the Highlands and the real sufferers, women and the innocent. 1 . The battlefield scene represents the time from plundering and butchering the wounded to when the ordinary people were allowed on to collect their dead. In the main central figure I have tried to impart a feeling of stoic dignity in the face of an uncertain future 2. The top section represents the form of Prince Charles. Despite the flames and carnage of Culloden, he is firmly supported in the hand of his Jacobite faithful to his safe exile aboard a French warship. Being mindfull that Clan tartans were not in common usage as uniforms of war at the time, only one tartan has been represented as such, that of the Royal Stewart, and that only to signify Charles claim to the thrones of England and Scotland. With his leaving, the sett fades as does he and his ambition. The burning, smouldering tartans signify the proscription of tartans, kilts, plaids etc by Westminster to discourage further rebellion. 3. With the Clans and their regiments broken, neither the natural barrier of the Highlands nor the great chiefs castles would prevent the poison of Culloden seeping into every glen or the fury of Cumberlands dragoons plundering at will. This is represented in the lower section. Armed with sword, manacles and the noose, these, Cumberlands most pitiless embarked on an orgy of murder, rape and pillage. The abyss of prison or exile awaited those suspected of Jacobite sympathies, the gallows for more serious resistance. Battles are fought and won, or lost, as all battles are, but Cullodens aftermath changed Scottish Highland society forever, ushering in a long period of suffering. This painting is my humble attempt to interpret that tragic period.

Culloden the Aftermath by Brian Wood (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Depicts two Irish peasants in traditional dress being marched through a Kerry glen by a recruiting party of the 88th Regiment (Connaught Rangers)

Listed for the Connaught Rangers by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
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