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The Lookout by Chris Collingwood.


The Lookout by Chris Collingwood.

Item Code : CC0209The Lookout by Chris Collingwood. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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Original oil on board. 18th century landscape painted on art board. Image size 27 inches x 19 inches (69cm x 48cm)Artist : Chris CollingwoodHalf
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Artist Details : Chris Collingwood
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Chris Collingwood


Chris Collingwood

Latest info : Chris has been busy with a number of private commissions but has completed the first in a second series of paintings of the Battle of Waterloo. This first painting depicts the charge of the Red Lancers on Mercers Troop of Royal Horse Artillery. This continues on from the series of Waterloo paintings which have been in print for the past few years and will be available as a signed limtied edition in approximately March 2010. The second painting showing the attack on British squares is expected in the summer.

Chris has produced a wealth of impressive paintings from the Napoleonic War, American Civil War, English Civil War, and a variety of Portraits of Great Military Leaders, He also has produced superb paintings of Pirates, a particular favourite of his. Chris studied at Berkshire College of Art 1966 - 1970 and then worked for Halas and Batchelor as a background artist. In the golden age of book cover illustration Chris made the Gunslinger, Crow and Herne series his own. To this day the shelves of high street booksellers are full of his work. Perhaps his best known popular pieces are in the now famous Jorvik Centres paintings which form the focus of the exhibitions promotion and won a travel industry award. In recent years his best work has been paintings, such as SPQR, Anne Bonny, Mary Reid and Calico Jack Rakam and Blackbeard in Damnation Seize My Soul. His super realistic style, using oils, brilliantly reflects the techniques, passion and depth of the old masters. He has a particular love of portraiture, which his portraits of Wellington and William of Orange certainly reflect, along with others from the English Civil War, his love of the subject. He is also fascinated by the awful romance of weaponry and war. Chris uses traditional Dutch paints made today, as in 1664, and is meticulous in his research and attention to detail, so scarce in our modern throw away society. Sir Anthony Van Dyke, William Dobson, Sir Peter Lely and Fortunio Matania played a vital part in his formative years. He also is much influenced by Meissonier and De Neuville.

More about Chris Collingwood

This Week's Half Price Art

 Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.

Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - 30.00
 The Mark IV Tank of Lt. F. MItchell MC, 1st battalion Tank Corps engages A7V tanks at Villers-Bretonneux, 24th April 1918.

The First Tank versus Tank Action by David Rowlands. (C)
Half Price! - 20.00
King Harold defeats the Viking invaders at Stamford Bridge before his long march south to face William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings.

Battle of Stamford Bridge by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - 50.00
 Under pressure from Stalin to open a second front in Europe, Operation Jubilee was designed ostensibly as a reconnaissance in force on the French coast, to show the feasibility of taking and holding a major defended port for a day, in this case Dieppe. The plan devised by Lord Louis Mountbatten failed due to inadequate naval and air support, carrying out the landing in daylight and general lack of intelligence of the target. Here new Churchill tanks of the 14th Canadian Tank Regiment (The Calgary Regiment), with men of the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry and Fusiliers Mont-Royals, struggle to fight their way off the beach. Only a handful of men penetrated into the town itself, and eventually the remaining troops were ordered to withdraw. Out of 5086 soldiers who landed only 1443 returned.

Disaster at Dieppe, France, 19th August 1942 by David Pentland. (Y)
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 Towards the end of the second battle of Cambrai, British Mark IV tanks of 12th Battalion confronted German captured Mark IVs. The ensuing battle was chaotic, emerging from smoke the Germans were initially mistaken as part of C Company, but at 50 meters both sides recovered from their surprise and opened fire simultaneously. The lead British tank L16 commanded by Captain Rowe was immediately knocked out, who escaped with his men to L19 just in time to see it destroyed, along with L12. The remaining tank L8 had broken down some distance back taking no part in the battle, although its commander Lieutenant Martel managed to use a captured 77mm artillery piece to finally halt the German tank.

Unexpected encounter at Niergnies, France, 8th October 1918 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Robert the Bruces Scots army stand fast as the English knights attack. Robert the Bruce succeeds in defeating the English army at Stirling.  With the full might of Englands army gathered before the besieged Stirling Castle, Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory. To the west of Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots, kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God.  Patiently awaiting the coming onslaught in tightly packed schiltroms, his spearmen and archers are well prepared for battle. Unknown to the English, the open marsh of no mans land conceals hidden pits and calthrops, major obstacles for any mounted charge. Despite Cliffords and Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve Stirling the day before, years of victory have caused the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the flower of the forest (archers) to weaken the enemy formations, the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush, hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester, thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable mass of spears, hurling themselves into defeat and death. With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through but the infantry stand firm. There is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground. Casualties amongst the English nobility are horrific. Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The English recoil and are pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn where many perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of the castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland, victory is complete.

The Battle of Bannockburn by Brian Palmer.
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German Stosstruppen of the 18th Army, having broken through the British lines near St Quentin, engage secondary trench lines occupied by men of the 9th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (36th Ulster Division) . Similar attacks occurred right across the BEFs front, where the new tactics of short bombardments, infiltration, close air support, and non persistent gas had ripped open the British lines.

The Kaisers Battle, Operation Michael, France, 21st March 1918 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Driven by revenge for the brutal treatment she had suffered at the hands of the Romans, Queen Boadicea led the Iceni and her allies the Trinovantas in open revolt. The IX Legion Hispania was despatched to suppress the insurrection but were ambushed en route. Only the commander Petilius Cerealis, and a handful of cavalry escaped.

Ambush of the XI Legion by Brian Palmer (P)
Half Price! - 1500.00
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