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Original art work for the book A Time of War Vol I, The Transgressors by Chris Collingwood.


Original art work for the book A Time of War Vol I, The Transgressors by Chris Collingwood.

Item Code : CC0088Original art work for the book A Time of War Vol I, The Transgressors by Chris Collingwood. - This Edition
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Original oil on board. Image size 21 inches x 14.5 inches (53cm x 37cm)Artist : Chris CollingwoodHalf
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Artist Details : Chris Collingwood
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Chris Collingwood


Chris Collingwood

Latest info : Chris has been busy with a number of private commissions but has completed the first in a second series of paintings of the Battle of Waterloo. This first painting depicts the charge of the Red Lancers on Mercers Troop of Royal Horse Artillery. This continues on from the series of Waterloo paintings which have been in print for the past few years and will be available as a signed limtied edition in approximately March 2010. The second painting showing the attack on British squares is expected in the summer.

Chris has produced a wealth of impressive paintings from the Napoleonic War, American Civil War, English Civil War, and a variety of Portraits of Great Military Leaders, He also has produced superb paintings of Pirates, a particular favourite of his. Chris studied at Berkshire College of Art 1966 - 1970 and then worked for Halas and Batchelor as a background artist. In the golden age of book cover illustration Chris made the Gunslinger, Crow and Herne series his own. To this day the shelves of high street booksellers are full of his work. Perhaps his best known popular pieces are in the now famous Jorvik Centres paintings which form the focus of the exhibitions promotion and won a travel industry award. In recent years his best work has been paintings, such as SPQR, Anne Bonny, Mary Reid and Calico Jack Rakam and Blackbeard in Damnation Seize My Soul. His super realistic style, using oils, brilliantly reflects the techniques, passion and depth of the old masters. He has a particular love of portraiture, which his portraits of Wellington and William of Orange certainly reflect, along with others from the English Civil War, his love of the subject. He is also fascinated by the awful romance of weaponry and war. Chris uses traditional Dutch paints made today, as in 1664, and is meticulous in his research and attention to detail, so scarce in our modern throw away society. Sir Anthony Van Dyke, William Dobson, Sir Peter Lely and Fortunio Matania played a vital part in his formative years. He also is much influenced by Meissonier and De Neuville.

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DHM1625P. 13th Light Dragoons at Windsor Castle by Chris Collingwood.

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 Assault in the vicinity of Thiepval by the Ulster division-1st July 1916.  The 11th Royal Irish Rifles, moving forward from the A line of trenches, and moving forward to attack the B line of trenches, the attacking infantry are preceded by Bombers - seen carryng grenades in green canvas buckets - who are engaged in throwing grenades in anticipation of the rifle company assault on the enemy trenches; an activity barely changed since the days of Marlborough.  The rifle companies are armed with the Lee Enfield SMLE - a superb rifle, though expensive to make.  The advance is made with bayonets fixed, as trench clearing involved numerous hand to hand confrontations and bayonet fights.  The rifle companies are supported by  two Lewis gun teams per company.  Note that visible in the painting is a man carrying an orange painted steel marker, painted on one side only. The markers are to to indicate to British artillery observers as to the most forward positions taken†by the British advance.  Naturally, one does not present the orange side to the enemy!

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 The Battle of Ulundi took place at the Zulu capital of Ulundi on 4th July 1879. Ulundi became the last battle to be fought during the Zulu war and the British victory finally broke the military power of the Zulu Nation. The battle began at 6 a.m. when Buller led out an advance guard of mounted troops and South African irregulars. The British force comprised of five companies of the 80th regiment in square in four ranks, with two Gatling Guns in the centres, two 9-pounders on the left flank and two 7-pounders on the right. The 90th Light Infantry with four companies of the 94th regiment made up the left face with two more 7-pounders. On the right face were the 1st Battalion of the 13th Light Infantry, four companies of the 58th Regiment, two 7-pounders and two 9-pounders. The rear face was composed of two companies of the 94th Regiment and two companies of the 2nd Battalion of the 21st Regiment. In the middle of the square were headquarters staff, No. 5 company of the Royal Engineers whhich was led by Lt John Chard who had commanded the troops at Rorkes Drift, the 2nd Native Natal Contingent, fifty wagons and carts with reserve ammunition and hospital wagons. Bullers horsemen protected the front and both flanks of the square. A rearguard of two squadrons of the 17th Lancers and a troop of Natal Native Horse followed. In total the British force stood at just over 5300 against the Zulu warrior regiments in total over 15000. The Zulu warriors charged again and again at the square but with the strong British firepower of tifle and gatling gun, they could not get close. As the Zulu warriors strength weakened, Lord Chelmsford ordered the cavalry to mount, and the 17th Lancers and the 1st Kings Dragoon Guards along with colonial cavalry were ordered to charge the now fleeing Zulus. The Zulus fled towards the high ground with the cavalry in pursuit. The Lancers were checked at the Mbilane stream by the fire of a concealed party of Zulus, causing a number casualties before the 17th Lancers overcame the Zulu resistance. The pursuit continued until not one living Zulu remained on the Mahlabatini plain, with members of the Natal Native Horse, Natal Native Contingent and Woods Irregulars slaughtering the Zulu wounded, done in revenge for the massacre at Isandlwana.

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In August 1808 the 2nd battalion of the 95th Rifles were part of the expedition commanded by Sir Arthur Wellesley to Portugal and covered the landings at Mondego Bay.  On 15th August during a skirmish at Obidos, they had the distinction of firing the first shots of the Peninsular War against the French.  The Rifles were trained to think quickly and by themselves in dangerous situations, they were also taught to work and fight together in pairs while firing harassing and well aimed shots at the enemy.  The Baker rifle which the 95th used was an accurate weapon for its day, with reported kills being taken up to 270 metres away.  During the Peninsular War, Rifleman Thomas Plunkett of the 1st Battalion, 95th Rifles, shot the French General Auguste-Marie-Francois Colbert at a range that may have been even greater.  Rifleman Thomas Plunkett then shot a second French officer who rode to the general's aid.

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 Troops of the 1st Hampshires assaulting Gold Beach during the Normandy Landings. Gold beach was one of the British beaches on D-Day. Gold beach was the western most beach of the British beaches, on D-Day. Gold beach was between two twenty metre high cliffs where German fortifications had been built. The beach had been protected by concrete casemates which took some time to break through. This happened with support form British tanks in the afternoon of D-day 6th June. The British tanks and reinforcements moved off the beaches towards Saint-Come-de-Fresene and Arromanches which were both liberated by 9pm.

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Rome AD52, Gladiatorial Combat under the eyes of the Emperor Claudius (actual name, Tiberius Claudius Drusus Nero) a great supporter of the games. Seen are the Net and Trident fighter Retiarius matched with a more heavily armed Mirmillone, whilst in the background a successful Secutor seeks permission for the killing stroke.

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 Depicting members of the 9th Regiment of Hussars 1806.

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