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Colditz - Under New Management by Nicolas Trudgian.


Colditz - Under New Management by Nicolas Trudgian.

Colditz - a forbidding medieval castle near Leiptzig, Germany - remains one of the most potent symbols of the Second World War. Reputed to be the Nazis most escape proof prison, this grim castle is the most notorious PoW camp in history with the distinction of being the only German prison that had more guards than prisoners. The castle was specifically used to impound incorrigible, Allied officers who had repeatedly escaped from other camps but putting so many experienced serial escapers in one place proved to be a rather questionable idea. Despite more conventional escape routes gradually being sealed off by the Germans, members of The Colditz Escape Academy continued to jump, tunnel and sneak out of this inescapable prison in surprising numbers. Early in the war Hermann Goering made a public declaration that Colditz was escape proof but he was to be proven wrong time and time again, and over 300 attempts were made during the course of the war, with more than 130 prisoners escaping and 31 successfully reaching home. When captured the result was three weeks in the solitary confinement block, however this didnt stop prisoners inventing even more elaborate means of escaping, even catapulting themselves out of high windows and of course the famous design and building of a sophisticated glider. This new edition, reproduced from a pencil drawing by Nicolas Trudgian, depicts the imposing castle shortly after being liberated by American troops in April 1945. In the foreground below a Sherman Tank of the 9th Armored Division stands on watch, close to the sign that was erected by the US 69th Infantry Division.
Item Code : DHM2598Colditz - Under New Management by Nicolas Trudgian. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Limited Edition : Signed limited edition of 200 prints.

Print paper size 14.5 inches x 12 inches (37cm x 31cm) Parker, Peter
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


Signature(s) value alone : £35
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FREE PRINT : LCT 312 by Ivan Berryman. (C)

This complimentary art print worth £48
(Size : 12.5 inches x 8 inches (32cm x 20cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

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Other editions of this item : Colditz - Under New Management by Nicolas Trudgian. DHM2598
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTColditz Proof Edition : Limited edition of 76 Colditz proofs.

Supplied double matted with an original piece of the wooden floor of the guardroom in the solitary confinement block at Colditz. Also supplied with a matching numbered book in a collectors slipcase, signed by the author, Michael Booker, and Prof Peter Hoffman.

Only 4 prints in this edition remaining.
Print paper size 14.5 inches x 12 inches (37cm x 31cm) Shapiro, Murray
Purdon, Corran
Goldfinch, Bill
Edwards, Mike
Davies-Scourfield, Grismond
Hoffman, Peter (companion print)
Parker, Peter
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


Signature(s) value alone : £230
£125 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £430.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
Major Peter Parker (deceased)
*Signature Value : £35

Major Peter Parker was born on 9th March 1918 and died on 24th June 2011, aged 93. His father, the tenth son of the 6th Earl of Macclesfield, was 57 when he was born. As his grandfather was born on 17 March 1811, three generations of Parkers spanned 200 years! After attending Eton and New College, Oxford, Peter was commissioned as a Regular officer in The Kings Royal Rifle Corps (KRRC) soon after the start of the Second World War. He was posted to 2 KRRC and in May 1940 was captured at Calais while serving as a platoon commander in C Company. Peter spent the next five years as a prisoner-of-war during which he and his fellow POWs were regularly moved; first to Laufen in Bavaria, next to an underground fort in Poland, then to Warburg in Westphalia. Caught digging an escape tunnel, they had to crawl out to face the guards. In 1943 Peter was moved to Eichstätt where he and 64 other POWs temporarily escaped by tunnelling under the perimeter fence. Quickly recaptured, Peter was placed in the dungeon of a nearby castle before receiving the ultimate punishment and prisoner accolade of imprisonment in Colditz Castle in eastern Prussia. There he found himself incarcerated with a number of Green Jacket officers, including Martin Gilliat, Mike Sinclair, Phil Pardoe and Gris Davies-Scourfield, members of 2 KRRC who had also been captured at Calais. Outwitting the Guards at Colditz was a major preoccupation. Peter had a part in one incident. The Escape Committee required a ladder. The prisoners broke a high window in the chapel. It was extremely cold so the Germans decided to mend it. A handyman with a guard brought a ladder to the window. While the handyman went to collect the glass, a prisoner started to writhe on the floor with a mouse up his shirt. A major disruption ensued and the guard was distracted. Immediately the ladder was stolen but it was too big to be smuggled up a spiral staircase. A saw was produced and two-thirds of the ladder was taken. The rest was put back. The handyman returned but now the ladder did not reach the window. A poltergeist was blamed. In May 1945 the Americans liberated Colditz. Released from captivity, Peter resumed his military career in autumn 1945 with 1 KRRC in Italy. In 1951 he attended the Staff College followed by two years in the War Office, before a posting to 2 KRRC in Münster. He subsequently retired from the Army in 1961 and committed himself to community life in Oxfordshire becoming a JP in 1962, a County Councillor (1967-74), High Sheriff of Oxfordshire in 1973 and a Deputy Lieutenant in 1974. Peter was a very modest man. He only spoke when he had something to say and, when he did speak, it was invariably succinct. His integrity shone through, as did his sense of humour and of fun. He never had an unkind word to say about anyone. He was a true English gentleman. Peter's wife, Rosemary, was a great-niece of General Sir Redvers Buller and inherited his estate at Downes, near Crediton, where their son, Henry, who served in The Royal Green Jackets from 1975-78, now lives. Peter's wife predeceased him in 1997. He is survived by his children, Henry and Belinda.

Christopher Wallace (from the Eulogy given by Brian Ford at Peter's Thanksgiving Service)
Artist Details : Nicolas Trudgian
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Nicolas Trudgian


Nicolas Trudgian

Cranston Fine Arts have now taken over all remaining stocks of Nicolas Trudgian prints from his previous publishers. We have made available a great many prints that had not been seen for many years, and have uncovered some rarities which lay unnoticed during this transition.

Having graduated from art college, Nicolas Trudgian spent many years as a professional illustrator before turning to a career in fine art painting. His crisp style of realism, attention to detail, compositional skills and bright use of colours, immediately found favour with collectors and demand for his original work soared on both sides of the Atlantic. Today, more than a decade after becoming a fine art painter, Nicolas Trudgian is firmly established within a tiny, elite group of aviation artists whose works are genuinely collected world-wide. When he paints an aircraft you can be sure he has researched it in every detail and when he puts it over a particular airfield, the chances are he has paid it a recent visit. Even when he paints a sunset over a tropical island, or mist hanging over a valley in China, most probably he has seen it with his own eyes. Nick was born and raised in the seafaring city of Plymouth, the port from which the Pilgrim Fathers set sail in 1620, and where Sir Francis Drake played bowls while awaiting the Spanish Armada. Growing up in a house close to the railway station within a busy military city, the harbour always teeming with naval vessels and the skies above resonating with the sounds of naval aircraft, it was not at all surprising the young Nick became fascinated with trains, boats and aircraft. It was from his father, himself a talented artist, that Nick acquired his love of drawing and surrounded by so much that was inspiring, there was never a shortage of ideas for pictures. His talent began to show at an early age and although he did well enough at school, he always spent a disproportionate amount of time drawing. People talked about him becoming a Naval officer or an architect but in 1975 Nick's mind was made up. When he told his careers teacher he wanted to go to art school the man said, 'Now come on, what do you really want to do? After leaving school Nick began a one-year foundation course at the Plymouth College of Art. Now armed with an impressive portfolio containing paintings of jet aircraft, trains, even wildlife, he was immediately accepted at every college he applied to join. He chose a course at the Falmouth College of Art in Cornwall specialising in technical illustration and paintings of machines and vehicles for industry. It was perfect for Nick, and he was to become one of the star pupils. One of the lecturers commented at the time: Every college needs someone with a talent like Nick to raise the standards sky high; he carried all the other students along with him, and created an effect which will last for years to come. Two weeks after leaving art college Nick blew every penny he had on a trip to South Africa to ride the great steam trains across the desert, sketching them at every opportunity. Returning to England, in best traditions of all young artists, he struggled to make a living. Paintings by an unknown artist didn't fetch much despite the painstaking effort and time Nick put into each work, so when the college he had recently left offered him a job as a lecturer, he jumped at the chance. The money was good and he discovered that he really enjoyed teaching. Throughout the 1970s Nick was much involved with a railway preservation society near Plymouth and it was through the railway society that he had his first pictures reproduced as prints. But Nick felt he needed to advance his career and in summer 1985 Nick moved away from Cornwall to join an energetic new design studio in Wiltshire. Here he painted detailed artwork for many major companies including Rolls Royce, General Motors, Volvo Trucks, Alfa Romeo and, to his delight, the aviation and defence industries. He remembers the job as exciting though stressful, often requiring him to work right through the night to meet a client's deadline. Here he learned to be disciplined and fast. Towards the end of the 1980's Nick had the chance to work for the Military Gallery. This was the break that for years he had been striving towards and with typical enthusiasm, flung himself into his new role. After completing a series of aviation posters, including a gigantic painting to commemorate the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Royal Air Force, Nick's first aviation scene to be published as a limited edition was launched by the Military Gallery in 1991. Despite the fact he was unknown in the field, it was an immediate success. Over the past decade Nick has earned a special reputation for giving those who love his work much more than just aircraft in his paintings. He goes to enormous lengths with his backgrounds, filling them with interesting and accurate detail, all designed to help give the aircraft in his paintings a tremendous sense of location and purpose. His landscapes are quite breathtaking and his buildings demonstrate an uncanny knowledge of perspective but it is the hardware in his paintings which are most striking. Whether it is an aircraft, tank, petrol bowser, or tractor, Nick brings it to life with all the inordinate skill of a truly accomplished fine art painter. A prodigious researcher, Nick travels extensively in his constant quest for information and fresh ideas. He has visited India, China, South Africa, South America, the Caribbean and travels regularly to the United States and Canada. He likes nothing better than to be out and about with sketchbook at the ready and if there is an old steam train in the vicinity, well that's a bonus!

More about Nicolas Trudgian

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