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March Past of the Grenadier Guards by Mark Churms.


March Past of the Grenadier Guards by Mark Churms.

The Duke of Wellington at the head of the 1st Foot Guards including the Colour Party, Hyde Park, 1829, as they pass King George IV with his staff and the Duke of Orleans while the band of the 2nd Life Guards perform. On the right of the picture is shown a Colonel of the 15th Hussars. Behind the figures can be seen Aspley House, the residence of the Duke of Wellington.
Item Code : DHM0368March Past of the Grenadier Guards by Mark Churms. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1000 prints.

Image size 15 inches x 24 inches (38cm x 61cm)Artist : Mark Churms£55 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £80.00

Quantity:
EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!


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FREE PRINT : Grenadier Guards 1804-1904 by Richard Simkin.

This complimentary art print worth £14
(Size : 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

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Other editions of this item : March Past of the Grenadier Guards by Mark Churms. DHM0368
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ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 15 inches x 24 inches (38cm x 61cm)Artist : Mark Churms£50 Off!Now : £90.00VIEW EDITION...
POSTCARD Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£2.00VIEW EDITION...
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Artist Details : Mark Churms
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Mark Churms


Mark Churms

Mark was born in Wales in 1967. He gained his degree in Architectural Studies at Oxford Polytechnic in 1989, but soon his interest in drawing buildings was surpassed by his love of painting horses and in 1991 he began work as a freelance artist. His first commissions were for sporting subjects, Polo, Racing and Hunting. However his consuming passion for military history, particularly of the Napoleonic era, quickly became his dominant theme, with the invaluable counsel of French military experts (accuracy in uniform and terrain of the various battles takes a great deal of time and consultation with many experts across Europe). Mark Churms joined Cranston Fine Arts in 1991 and for a period of 8 years, was commissioned for several series and special commissions. His series of the Zulu War, and of the Battle of Waterloo were the highlights during this period. Mark Churms' deep understanding and detailed knowledge of the period made Mark at that time one of the most prolific and successfull artists for Cranston Fine Arts. Cranston Fine Arts are proud with their series of superb art prints and original paintings painted by Mark Churms in this period. We now offer Mark Churms art prints in special 2 and 4 print packs with great discounts as well as a number of selected original paintings at upto half price.

More about Mark Churms

This Week's Half Price Art

 Last stand of the 24th South Wales Borderers at Isandhlwana during the Zulu War. The battle of Isandhlwana, a Zulu victory over the British forces on 22nd January 1879 about 100km north of Durban. Lord Chelmsford led a column of forces to seek out the Zulu army camped at Isandhlwana, while patrols searched the district. After receiving a report, Chelmsford set forth at half strength, leaving six companies of the 24th Regiment, two guns, some Colonial Volunteers and a native contingent (in all about 1,800 troops) at the camp. Later that morning an advanced post warned of an approaching Zulu army. Shortly after this, thousands of Zulus were found hidden in a ravine by a mounted patrol but as the patrol set off to warn the camp, the Zulus followed. At the orders of the Camp Commander, troops spread out around the perimeter of the camp, but the Zulu army broke through their defences. The native contingent who fled during the attack were hunted down and killed. The remaining troops of the 24th Regiment, 534 soldiers and 21 officers, were killed where they fought. The Zulus left no one alive, taking no prisoners and leaving no wounded or missing. About 300 Africans and 50 Europeans escaped the attack. Consequently, the invasion of Zulu country was delayed while reinforcements arrived from Britain.

Battle of Isandhlwana, 22nd January 1879 by Brian Palmer. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
DHM230.  The Dispatch by H Bellange.
The Dispatch by H Bellange.
Half Price! - £30.00
 The Battle of Barnet was fought in a heavy mist, on Easter Sunday 14th April 1471. Due to a misalignment of the opposing armies, all became confusion. The centre of the battle (as depicted here) was fought at close quarters, a mass of struggling knights and men at arms with comrade fighting comrade, their vision of the battle obscured by mist. The Yorkists under the leadership of King Edward IV triumphed, leaving the Lancastrians with hopes dashed. Their champion and leader, the great Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick The King Maker lay dead, cut down while struggling to regain his charger. In the painting Edward IV charges toward the banner of Henry Holland, Duke of Exeter, while in the foreground soldiers of the Houses of York and Lancaster hack and slash at each other in terrified butchery.

Battle of Barnet by Chris Collingwood. (GS)
Half Price! - £370.00
 It is August 1944, barely two months since the Allies landed their first troops on the beaches of Normandy. After the failed Operation Lüttich (codename given to a German counterattack during the Battle of Normandy, which took place around the American positions near Mortain from 7 August to 13 August, 1944 ) The German Panzer Divisions were in full retreat, The British and American Generals believed it to be critical to halt them before they cauld regroup. Caught in the Gap at Falaise, the battle was to be decisive. Flying throughout a continuous onslaught, rocket-firing Typhoons kept up their attacks on the trapped armoured divisions from dawn to dusk. The effect was devastating: at the end of the ten day battle the 100,000 strong German force was decimated. The battle of the Falaise Pocket marked the closing phase of the Battle of Normandy with a decisive German defeat. It is believed that between 80,000 to 100,000 German troops were caught in the encirclement of which 10,000 to 15,000 were killed, 45,000 to 50,000 taken prisoner, and around 20,000 escaped . Shown here are German Tiger I tanks under continues attack by Royal Aoir Force Typhoons.

Taming the Tiger by Geoff Lea. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>

King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
 After a major victory at Salamanca (22 July 1812) Wellington occupied Madrid and then advanced to capture Burgos - unfortunately with insufficient siege equipment he was compelled to retire and forced to experience a harrowing retreat, it was, he said The worst scrape. However, when the campaigning season ended, Spain, south of the Tagus, was free of the French.

The Worst Scrape - Retreat from Burgos October/November 1812 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Taking over command of the British Northern Army in 1777, Lt Gen Burgoyne began a march to Albany to join forces with Lt Gen Sir William Howe.  After taking Fort Ticonderoga on route he learned that Howe was leaving for Pennsylvania.  Becoming desperately short on supplies he decided to press on the Albany regardless but found the road blocked by a Continental army under Maj Gen Horatio Gates.  Burgoyne decided not to engage the enemys position frontally but to turn their left at Freemans Farm.  After a day of fierce fighting the British held the field but at a heavy price in casualties.  On the 7th October the Colonial army, after receiving continual reinforcements attacked Howes position (the battle became known as Bemis Heights) and he was forced to retire to Saratoga.

The 9th Regiment, at the Battle of Freemans Farm, September 19th 1777 by Brian Palmer
Half Price! - £50.00
 Depicting the charge of the Bucks, Berks and Dorset Yeomanry on November 13th 1917 during the Palestine campaign.

Action of the 6th Mounted Brigade at El Muhgar by J P Beadle. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
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