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PUBLISHING   MILITARY   ART   FOR   OVER   TWENTY   YEARS

Largest publisher of military, naval and aviation art, and leading distributor of sport, wildlife and landscape art.  Select from over 18,000 images, over half of which are exclusive to Cranston Fine Arts, and including over 400 original paintings by many of the world's leading artists, all available from our massive online shop.

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Publishing historical art since 1985

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Top 10 Aircraft :
 
New Print Packs
Richard III and Battle of Bosworth Military Print Pack.
Battle

Battle of Bosworth by Brian Palmer.
Richard

Richard III by Chris Collingwood.
Save £175!
Nicolas Trudgian Railway Art Prints.
Spirit

Spirit of the Mountain by Nicolas Trudgian
Canyon

Canyon of Lost Souls by Nicolas Trudgian
Save £155!
Battle of Waterloo Napoleon and Wellington Military Prints.
The

The Battle of Waterloo by Robert Hillingford (B)
Napoleons

Napoleons Last Grand Attack by Ernest Crofts (B)
Save £45!
Spitfire Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
First

First Flap of the Day by Nicolas Trudgian. (C)
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save £210!
Spitfire Print Pack by Nicolas Trudgian.
Winter
Winter of 41 by Nicolas Trudgian.
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save £240!

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GET A FREE PRINT WITH OVER 1,300 OF OUR PRINTS!

We are giving away a free related print with over 1,300 of the prints available from this website, adding value you can't get anywhere else.  In the example above, buy Anthony Saunders' recent release 'The Breach' and get another print of the same aircraft on the same raid absolutely free.  As you browse using the menus at the top of the page, you will see these free prints clearly marked on the item pages, along with the saving being made - sometimes well over £100!

This Week's Half Price Offers

 After the Battle of Roundway Down 13th July 1643, a grief stricken girl meets her true love all too briefly for the last time.

Found and Lost by Chris Collingwood (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
 Lance Corporal Mel Townsend, 22 SAS, in action in Dhofar, 6th January, 1975, for which he was awarded the DCM.  Mel Townsend, of the Royal Corps of Signals, was a member of a squadron of the 22nd SAS Regiment controlling Arab Irregulars in support of the Sultan of Oman's Armed Forces in Dhofar from September 1974 to January 1975.  He was the leader of a four man SAS liaison patrol attached to a company of the Sultan's Armed Forces in a battalion operation against guerrilla forces on 6th January 1975.  His company was demoralised after coming under heavy enemy fire and Mel noticed that very little fire was being returned.  He ran forward with two other men and began returning fire.  He then encouraged the Arab soldiers to fire their weapons and inspired them to do so by his personal example.  His initiative saved the day.  He was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his <i>inspiring example of the highest gallantry and military ability.</i>

Lance Corporal Mel Townsend by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942.

In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Last stand of the 24th South Wales Borderers at Isandhlwana during the Zulu War.  The battle of Isandhlwana, a Zulu victory over the British forces on 22nd January 1879 about 100km north of Durban.  Lord Chelmsford led a column of forces to seek out the Zulu army camped at Isandhlwana, while patrols searched the district.  After receiving a report, Chelmsford set forth at half strength, leaving six companies of the 24th Regiment, two guns, some Colonial Volunteers and a native contingent (in all about 1,800 troops) at the camp.  Later that morning an advanced post warned of an approaching Zulu army.  Shortly after this, thousands of Zulus were found hidden in a ravine by a mounted patrol but as the patrol set off to warn the camp, the Zulus followed.  At the orders of the Camp Commander, troops spread out around the perimeter of the camp, but the Zulu army broke through their defences.  The native contingent who fled during the attack were hunted down and killed.  The remaining troops of the 24th Regiment, 534 soldiers and 21 officers, were killed where they fought.  The Zulus left no one alive, taking no prisoners and leaving no wounded or missing.  About 300 Africans and 50 Europeans escaped the attack.  Consequently, the invasion of Zulu country was delayed while reinforcements arrived from Britain.

Battle of Isandhlwana, 22nd January 1879 by Brian Palmer. (P)
Half Price! - £1800.00

 For reigning World Champion Sebastian Vettel, it was business as usual for the first Formula 1 race of 2011 in Melbourne, the German securing a dominant pole position in qualifying and following it up with a decisive win the following day in the Red Bull RB7.  Lewis Hamilton's McLaren was in the hunt throughout the race, the Briton taking an eventual second place after duelling closely with his rival in the early stages.

The New Order by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Assigned to the 393rd Bombardment Squadron, USAAF, <i>Enola Gay</i> was one of 15 Boeing B-29s with the 'Silverplate' modifications necessary to deliver the new atomic weapons.  She is depicted here in company with <i>The Great Artiste</i>, one of the other two B-29s that took part in the first nuclear bombing mission against the Japanese city of Hiroshima on 6th August 1945.  The three ship mission consisted of <i>Enola Gay</i> (victor number 82), piloted by Colonel Paul W Tibbets, <i>The Great Artiste</i> (89), piloted by Major Charles W Sweeney and number 91, later named <i>Necessary Evil</i>, piloted by Captain George W Marquardt. Tibbets' aircraft was assigned for weapons delivery, whilst Sweeney's carried blast measurement instrumentation and Marquardt's was the camera ship.  This mission and that against the city of Nagasaki a short time later changed the course of history forever and remain to this day the only time that nuclear bombs have been used in anger.

New Frontiers - Enola Gay by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £1300.00
GIFP3449GL.  Reflections of a Highland Landscape by Henry Brittan Willis.
Reflections of a Highland Landscape by Henry Brittan Willis (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
DHM193GS.  Trumpeter of the French Cuirassiers Going to Battle by Detaille.

Trumpeter of the French Cuirassiers Going to Battle by Edouard Detaille (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00

Latest Military Art Releases

 British Cruiser Mark IA CS (A9) tanks and Bren Carriers of A Squadron, 3RTR, 1st Armoured Division, line the road south of Calais, prior to being sent south to secure the bridges on the St. Omer canal. The British column of tanks failed to reach its objective, encountering the advance guard of 1st Panzer Division near the little village of Hames-Boucre, and after an inconclusive afternoon battle fell back towards Calais in the early evening.

Last Stand at Calais by David Pentland.
 Egypt, North Africa, 26th May 1941. Two Panzer IIIG's of Rommels' Afrika Korps advance towards Halfaya Pass during Operation Skorpion. Following the recent loss of the pass to the British in Operation Brevity, the Afrika Korps launched a counter attack to regain the vital position, and forced the British under Lt. Gen. Gott back to Sofafi and Buq Buq.

Operation Skorpion by David Pentland.
 Kiev, Ukraine, 7th August - 26th September 1941. Panzer IIF light tanks of the 11th Panzer Division, 'Ghost', 1st Panzergruppe, Army Group South, advance during the battle of Kiev. This was to be the largest encirclement in history and a crushing defeat for the Soviet Southwestern Front.

Point of the Pincer by David Pentland.
 Libya, North Africa, 15th May 1941. British Cruiser Mark II (A10) tanks of 2nd Royal Tank Regiment, 7th Armoured Brigade pause during General Wavell's offensive against the Italian held Halfaya Pass and Fort Capuzzo. Led by General 'Straffer' Gott the attack was initially a success, but counter attacks by German reinforcements halted the British offensive after one day, and pushed it back to the Egyptian border.

Operation Brevity by David Pentland.

Latest Aviation Art Releases

 IAF Squadron Commander Avaham Lanir, flying an Israeli Air Force Mirage III high over the Syrian desert, scores a victory over a Syrian MiG-21 on 9 November 1972. Later, during the Yom Kippur War, his Mirage was hit by a Syrian missile ambush, forcing him to eject over enemy territory. Despite valiant efforts to rescue him, he was captured by the Syrians and died under interrogation.
Desert Victory by Robert Taylor.
 June 1940 and the freedom of Britain lay in the hands of a small band of young RAF fighter pilots. Facing them across the Channel, the all-conquering Luftwaffe stood in eager anticipation of an easy victory, one that would allow were Hitler's mighty armies to invade. So heavily were the odds stacked against the RAF, few gave Fighter Command a chance. The American ambassador to Britain reported that <i>democracy is finished in England</i>. He was wrong.  Although outnumbered more than five to one at the outset, as the savage aerial battles raged continuously over southern England, the courage and dedication of Fighter Command's young airmen gradually turned the tide. By the end of September the battle was won and, for the first time, the Luftwaffe had tasted defeat.  Richard Taylor's outstanding composition portrays a more reflective image of those heroic RAF fighter pilots in contrast perhaps to the deadly trials they faced on a daily basis. Just occasionally during that long hot summer of 1940 were rare moments of peaceful respite. Every minute off-duty was time to be savoured, especially for this particular young fighter pilot and his girl as they briefly pause along a quiet country lane to watch the Spitfires from 92 Squadron pass low overhead. For a few moments the distinctive roar of Merlin engines shatters the peace and they both know that this time tomorrow it will be him who will be flying into combat.
Quiet Reflection by Richard Taylor.
 March 1944 and heavy snow has settled firmly over the frozen Lincolnshire countryside around RAF Fiskerton. For once the Lancasters of 49 Squadron stand quietly idle at their dispersal points around the perimeter of the airfield. It is a scene recreated at many other heavy bomber airfields across the east of England and the young airmen who crew these mighty machines now wait patiently for the inevitable thaw that will soon see them in combat again.  For some, however, the future is uncertain. Just a few weeks later, on 30 March 1944, during a raid on Nuremberg, more than 100 bombers would be shot down. In the space of a single night Bomber Command would suffer more men lost than Fighter Command during the entire Battle of Britain.  Bomber Command flew more than 389,000 sorties from 101 operational bases across the east of England during WWII and the aircrew that undertook these missions came from Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Rhodesia and many countries under Nazi occupation. Every airman was a volunteer and with an average age of just 22 they were forced to grow up quickly, enduring frightening odds and suffering terrible losses - only the Nazi U-Boat force experienced a higher casualty rate.  Of the 125,000 men who served, 55,573 were killed. For every 100 airmen who joined Bomber Command, 45 would lose their lives, 6 would be seriously wounded and 8 made prisoners of war. Yet they resolutely overcame the overwhelming forces stacked against them, including some of the worst flying conditions imaginable and, never flinching from their task, flew until victory was finally achieved.
Ops On Hold by Richard Taylor.
 Yom Kippur - the Day of Atonement - is the holiest day in the Hebrew calendar and in Israel is marked by a national holiday but on that day in 1973 the unexpected happened. At 14.00 hours on 6 October the coalition of Arab states led by Egypt and Syria launched a surprise attack on Israeli positions. Thousands of Egyptian troops swarmed across the Suez Canal into Israeli held Sinai whilst in the north nearly 1,500 Syrian tanks backed by artillery thrust west towards Israel. Facing this sudden surprise attack on the Golan Heights were less than 200 Israeli tanks. In the air, too, Egyptian and Syrian air forces struck in a single, co-ordinated assault hitting the Israeli anti-aircraft defences and hoping to deliver a fatal blow.  Largely unprepared, Israel reeled however within hours it mobilised its fighting reserves and began a ferocious battle to stem the enemies advance. As Israeli tanks and infantry rushed to hold the front line and, in the north, push the enemy back, Israeli Air Force jets overhead fought a heroic battle to regain the initiative and control of the skies. It was grim work. Both Egyptian and Syrian forces were equipped with hundreds of Soviet-supplied SAM missiles but the tide of war was turning and a battered Israeli Air Force now went on the counter-offensive. And amongst their main targets were the heavily-defended Egyptian air bases that lay deep in the Nile delta.  Robert Taylor's powerful and dramatic painting depicts one such strike that took place on 14 October 1973, half way through the war, when Israeli F-4 Phantom fighter-bombers made simultaneous strikes against the Egyptian air bases at Mansoura and Tanta north of Cairo.  After the first wave struck the elite Egyptian MiG-21 units at El Mansoura, the other Phantom squadrons attacked Tanta in waves, turning to dog-fighting immediately after dropping their ordnance. Tanta was also home to two squadrons of Libyan Mirage 5s and the furious air battle that ensued involved countless fighter aircraft. Despite bitter opposition, the successful IAF missions eliminated much of the effectiveness of the Egyptian Air Force and its Libyan allies.
Double Strike by Robert Taylor.

Latest Naval Art Releases

 Built at Toulon in 1803, Bucentaure was the flagship of Admiral Villeneuve at the Battle of Trafalgar on 21st October 1805 and the first to be almost completely disabled by a massive broadside from HMS Victory as Nelson broke through the enemy line.  Bucentaure was taken as a prize by the British fleet, but was lost in the great storm that followed the battle.

Bucentaure by Ivan Berryman.
 One of the most iconic ships of all time and now beautifully restored to her 1805 condition at Portsmouth, Nelson's flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar, HMS Victory, is seen here departing Portsmouth Harbour with the frigate Euryalus.

Farewell, Old Portsmouth by Ivan Berryman.
 Launched in 1797, the USS Constitution was the third of her class to be constructed at Edmund Hartt's shipyard in Boston, Massachusetts, this fine ship spending most of her early years in local waters, protecting merchantmen from French marauders.  She is best remembered, however, for her decisive conquests against British ships during the war of 1812, among them the Guerriere against whom the Constitution gained her nickname 'Old Ironsides'.  She continued to serve until 1881 and is still afloat today, the oldest seagoing warship in the world.

USS Constitution - 'Old Ironsides' by Ivan Berryman.
 Arguably the best known warship in the world, and one of only a few survivors of her era, HMS Victory was the flagship of Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson at Trafalgar in 1805, leading the victorious British fleet into battle against the combined French and Spanish navies.  Severely damaged during the battle, she remained afloat at Portsmouth into the 20th century and is now preserved there in dry dock for future generations to visit.  Extraordinarily, HMS Victory is still a commissioned ship in the Royal Navy and is frequently used for ceremonial duties.

HMS Victory by Ivan Berryman.

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SPECIAL FEATURE - THE DAMBUSTERS
We have produced a series of four articles to coincide with the 70th anniversary of the Dambusters raid in May 1943.  These articles tackle the chronological events of the mission through artwork, with commentary, aircraft details and crew details.  Every crew member and every aircraft is detailed in over 70 pieces of artwork.  See the articles on the links below.

Part 1 : From Preparations to the Dutch Coast
Part 2 : From the Coast to the Dams
Part 3 : The Attack on the Mohne
Part 4: The Eder and Beyond

 

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