CRANSTON FINE ARTS    -    ONLINE SHOP

PUBLISHING   MILITARY   ART   FOR   OVER   TWENTY   YEARS

Largest publisher of military, naval and aviation art, and leading distributor of sport, wildlife and landscape art.  Select from over 18,000 images, over half of which are exclusive to Cranston Fine Arts, and including over 400 original paintings by many of the world's leading artists, all available from our massive online shop.

          View Basket / Checkout  
Product Search            
 


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

QUICK SEARCHES 

Top 10 Aircraft :
 
New Print Packs
Don Breckon Steam Engine Railway Prints.
Country
Country Connection by Don Breckon.
Beside
Beside the Pond by Don Breckon.
Save £48!
Clipper Ships Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
Flying

Flying Cloud by Robert Taylor.
Cutty

Cutty Sark by Ivan Berryman.
Save £40!
Confederate Military Prints.
Portrait
Portrait of General Lee by Geoff Lea.
Furling
Furling the Flag by Richard Brooke.
Save £75!
Royal Navy Submarine Prints
Secret
Secret Operation by Robert Taylor.
Working

Working Up by Robert Barbour.
Save £85!
Royal Navy Cruiser Art Prints.
Night

Night Attack on the Newcastle by Robert Taylor.
Richelieu

Richelieu and HMS Cumberland 1945 by Ivan Berryman.
Save £100!

Sign up for our free newsletter!

GET A FREE PRINT WITH OVER 1,300 OF OUR PRINTS!

We are giving away a free related print with over 1,300 of the prints available from this website, adding value you can't get anywhere else.  In the example above, buy Anthony Saunders' recent release 'The Breach' and get another print of the same aircraft on the same raid absolutely free.  As you browse using the menus at the top of the page, you will see these free prints clearly marked on the item pages, along with the saving being made - sometimes well over £100!

PLUS - Spend over £220 on any items in our shop and choose a FREE print from the selection on this page.  

This Week's Half Price Offers

 The heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen slips quietly through the waters of Kiel Harbour as one of her own Arado Ar.196s flies overhead. In the background, Bismarck, wearing her Baltic camouflage, is alongside taking on supplies.

Prinz Eugen by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 Eddie Irvine.  Jaguar-Cosworth 2002
Green Giant by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00
GL25. Houses of Parliament by Graeme Lothian.

Houses of Parliament by Graeme Lothian.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Opened in 1932, Ryde airport became the principal airport for the Isle of Wight, with routes being operated to destinations as far away as Croydon, Bristol and Shoreham, as well as a regular commuter service that took in Southampton, Bournemouth and Portsmouth.  This painting depicts a typical day early in 1936 when aircraft of both Portsmouth, Southsea and Isle of Wight Aviation Ltd  and Railway Air Services were using the airport, in this case, Airspeed Courier G-ADAY and De Havilland Dragon Rapide G-ACPR City of Birmingham respectively.  The airport closed officially in 1939, but may have been used sporadically after the war.  The site of the airport is now occupied by Tesco and McDonalds.

Ryde Airport, 1936 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £80.00

 These Republic P-47D Thunderbolts were operational with the 82nd FS, 78th FG based at Duxford during the final months of the war in Europe.

Duxford Pair by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £75.00
 In an attempt to expand into Europe, Ottoman Turks under the command of Grand Vizier Kara Mustafa laid siege to Vienna for two months.  A coalition of Polish, German and Austrians led by John III Sobieski, the King of Poland, arrived before Vienna to raise the siege.  Sobieski led a charge of 20,000 cavalry, including the fearsome Winged Hussars into the Ottoman camp and completely routed their army. The battle was over in three hours, the Turks fled the field leaving behind tents, weapons, battle standards and provisions.  The threat to Europe had been reversed, and this battle signaled the beginning of the end for the Ottoman Empire.

Polish Winged Lancers - Battle of Vienna, September 12th 1683 by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £40.00
 The painting shows a gun team of the Royal Horse Artillery with wounded soldiers on the Limber during the retreat to Corunna in the winter of 1808-1809, during the Peninsula War.

Halt on a Forced March by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 Between 24th may and 4th June 1940 an extraordinary armada of craft, large and small, naval and civilian, embarked on one of the greatest rescue missions in history. the evacuation of 330,000 British and French troops from the beaches of Dunkirk in northern France. the destroyer HMS Wakeful dominates the foreground here as troops pour onto the beaches and harbour moles in search of salvation. Both Wakeful and distant HMS Grafton were lost during the evacuation.

Dunkirk by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00

Latest Military Art Releases

 Private and Officer - Royal Army Medical Corps, Surgeon-General - Army Medical Staff, Sergeant-Major - Royal Army Medical Corps.

Army Medical Corps by Richard Simkin
 Bridging, Review and Marching Order - Officers, Review Order - Field-Officer and Sapper, Constructing Shelter Trench.

Volunteer Royal Engineers by Richard Simkin
 Undress - Officer, Review Order - Field Officer and Officer, Review Order - 16 Pounder Rifled Muzzle-Loading Field Gun and Detachment.

Volunteer Royal Artillery by Richard Simkin
 Lieutenant - Royal Field Artillery, Captain - Royal Engineers, Lieutenant and Captain (Field Service Hat) - Infantry of the Line, Major (Foreign Service Hat) - Cavalry, Captain - Army Service Corps, Staff.

The New Service Dress for British Officers by Richard Simkin

Latest Aviation Art Releases

 Continuing his popular series of Giclée Studio Proofs on canvas, Robert Taylor portrays Squadron Leader 'Sailor' Malan DFC, Commanding Officer of 74 Squadron and one of the great Battle of Britain Aces, in his famous painting Height of the Battle.  Having already made one diving attack into the force of Luftwaffe He111 bombers approaching London with their fighter escort, 'Sailor' peels his Spitfire over for a second attack. Another top Ace, Pilot Officer Harbourne Stephen DFC, is hard on his heels. Below them, typifying the scene as it was on the afternoon of Wednesday 11 September 1940, Mk.I Hurricanes from 17 and 56 Squadrons have already joined the fray.
Height of the Battle by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 The latest Giclée technology has once again brought Robert Taylor's sophisticated artistry to life to faithfully replicate his classic painting of the Hurricanes of 1 Squadron (RCAF).  Becoming operational at Northolt in August 1940 they served with great distinction throughout the Battle of Britain.
Maple Leaf Scramble by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 Few flew the Hurricane better in combat than Squadron Leader John Grandy, Commanding Officer of 249 Squadron. Robert Taylor's iconic painting Hurricane Attack portrays him about to pounce on a Bf110 over the Isle of Wight in August 1940.
Hurricane Attack by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 By any military standards, it is difficult to imagine the Supreme Commander of the largest air force of the day, piloting himself over the battlefront during the early moments of one of historys greatest military operations. But General Jimmy Doollittle was no ordinary commander. Already awarded Americas highest decoration for valour, General Doolittle was, by the summer of 1944, in command of the American 8th Air Force. On the morning of 6 June, D-Day, he dispatched 1350 bombers together with his entire fighter force to attack enemy ground installations near the beachheads. Sitting around waiting for intelligence reports was not Jimmy Doolittles style. He was going to see for himself what was happening! With Pat Partridge as wingman, they took off flying P-38 Lightnings - chosen for their distinctive profile in the hopes they would deter friendly fire - and climbed above the overcast. Having observed the 8th Air Forces operations at first hand, as they turned for home, Doolittle spotted a hole in the clouds, flick-rolled through it and disappeared beneath the cloud layer. Pat Partridge had his head in the cockpit, probably changing his gas tanks, and when he looked up there was no sign of his Supreme Commander, he circled around for a while, then headed for home. Beneath the clouds Doolittle saw - the most impressive and unforgettable sight I could have possibly imagined - . As some 5000 ships of all shapes and sizes landed 176,000 troops on the enemy held beaches of Northern France, Doolittle flew up and down the battlefront assessing how the invasion was progressing, and after a two and a half hour sortie, headed back to base. After landing, Doolittle hurried over to General Eisenhowers headquarters to provide the first report Eisenhower received, beating his own intelligence information by several hours.
Doolittles D-Day, 6th June 1944 by Robert Taylor. (GS)

Latest Naval Art Releases

 Arguably the best known warship in the world, and one of only a few survivors of her era, HMS Victory was the flagship of Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson at Trafalgar in 1805, leading the victorious British fleet into battle against the combined French and Spanish navies.  Severely damaged during the battle, she remained afloat at Portsmouth into the 20th century and is now preserved there in dry dock for future generations to visit.  Extraordinarily, HMS Victory is still a commissioned ship in the Royal Navy and is frequently used for ceremonial duties.

HMS Victory by Ivan Berryman.
 Launched at Bucklers Hard in Hampshire in 1803, the frigate HMS Euryalus is probably best known for the small part she played at Trafalgar.  She was one of four British frigates sent to observe the combined French and Spanish fleets as they left Cadiz for what would become the Battle of Trafalgar.  Having shadowed the enemy through the night, Euryalus sped ahead to warn the British fleet, commanded by Admiral Lord Nelson.  Too small to play a significant part in the battle itself, Euryalus stood off until the afternoon when she took the badly damaged Royal Sovereign in tow, Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood transferring his flag to the little frigate following the death of Nelson.  By 1825, her career as a fighting ship was over and she was decommissioned to become a prison ship until the mid 1840s when she became a coal hulk.  She soldiered on in number of other menial roles until 1860 when she was finally broken up.

HMS Euryalus - Shadowing the Fleet by Ivan Berryman.
 Nelson's flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar is depicted here passing the iconic Round Tower at the entrance to Portsmouth Harbour before dropping anchor at Spithead in readiness for her next voyage.  With her is the sloop HMS Pickle, also a veteran of Trafalgar, who carried Admiral Collingwood's victory despatch to the Admiralty after the great battle had been won.

HMS Victory Departing Portsmouth by Ivan Berryman.
One of the most iconic ships ever to serve in the Royal Navy, The three-decked second rate HMS Temeraire was built at Chatham in 1798 and spent many years blockading the French port of Brest before her finest hour at Trafalgar on 21st October 1805 when she came to the rescue of HMS Victory before capturing two prizes, the Redoutable and Fougueux, spending much of the battle with her captives lashed to her sides.  After spending her final years first as a prison hulk, then as a guard ship in the Medway, she was finally sold for scrap in 1838, her last journey being the subject of JMW Turner's most famous painting.  In this view, Temeraire is shown leaving the Plymouth in her pre-Trafalgar state before receiving her 'crowned head' figurehead.

HMS Temeraire Departing Plymouth by Ivan Berryman.

Shipping Costs


SPECIAL FEATURE - THE DAMBUSTERS
We have produced a series of four articles to coincide with the 70th anniversary of the Dambusters raid in May 1943.  These articles tackle the chronological events of the mission through artwork, with commentary, aircraft details and crew details.  Every crew member and every aircraft is detailed in over 70 pieces of artwork.  See the articles on the links below.

Part 1 : From Preparations to the Dutch Coast
Part 2 : From the Coast to the Dams
Part 3 : The Attack on the Möhne
Part 4: The Eder and Beyond

 

Visa Credit payments supported by RBS WorldPay Visa Debit payments supported by RBS WorldPay Visa Electron payments supported by RBS WorldPay Mastercard payments supported by RBS WorldPay Maestro payments supported by RBS WorldPay JCB payments supported by RBS WorldPay

RBS WorldPay Payments Processing


Product Search             
(Exact match search, including Product codes and ID numbers)