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PUBLISHING   MILITARY   ART   FOR   OVER   TWENTY   YEARS

Largest publisher of military, naval and aviation art, and leading distributor of sport, wildlife and landscape art.  Select from over 18,000 images, over half of which are exclusive to Cranston Fine Arts, and including over 400 original paintings by many of the world's leading artists, all available from our massive online shop.

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Top 10 Aircraft :
 
New Print Packs
Richard III and Battle of Bosworth Military Print Pack.
Battle

Battle of Bosworth by Brian Palmer.
Richard

Richard III by Chris Collingwood.
Save £175!
Nicolas Trudgian Railway Art Prints.
Spirit

Spirit of the Mountain by Nicolas Trudgian
Canyon

Canyon of Lost Souls by Nicolas Trudgian
Save £155!
Battle of Waterloo Napoleon and Wellington Military Prints.
The

The Battle of Waterloo by Robert Hillingford (B)
Napoleons

Napoleons Last Grand Attack by Ernest Crofts (B)
Save £45!
Spitfire Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
First

First Flap of the Day by Nicolas Trudgian. (C)
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save £210!
Spitfire Print Pack by Nicolas Trudgian.
Winter
Winter of 41 by Nicolas Trudgian.
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save £240!

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GET A FREE PRINT WITH OVER 1,300 OF OUR PRINTS!

We are giving away a free related print with over 1,300 of the prints available from this website, adding value you can't get anywhere else.  In the example above, buy Anthony Saunders' recent release 'The Breach' and get another print of the same aircraft on the same raid absolutely free.  As you browse using the menus at the top of the page, you will see these free prints clearly marked on the item pages, along with the saving being made - sometimes well over £100!

This Week's Half Price Offers

 Every evening Commander TFH holds an evening update to discuss with unit commanders or their representatives the events of the day.  Each unit will give a small synopsis of the day's events - this includes intelligence, weather and media operations.  Senior personnel sit at the inner table and Captains or Majors sit around the benches by the walls.

Commander Task Force Helmand Evening Update, Lashkar Gah, Afghanistan by Graeme Lothian. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Sydney engages Italian ships off Cape Busa, Crete.
HMAS Sydney By Randall Wilson (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Dominating the centre foreground, the wreck of the largest ship at Trafalgar, the massive four decker Santisima Trinidad (130 guns), comes under further attack from the British Neptune (98 guns)  All her masts have fallen, rendering the Spanish giant an unmanageable hulk.  Elsewhere, the battle rages on with Temeraire and Victory engaged with the French Redoubtable, while to the right of the picture, the shattered, drifting remains of Villeneuves Bucentaure (80 guns) is approached by the Mars (74 guns)  Conqueror (74 guns), off the Santisima Trinidads port quarter, is keeping up a distant fire to assist the Neptune.

The Battle of Trafalgar, 2.30pm. The Taking of the Santisima Trinidad by Ivan Berryman (GM)
Half Price! - £300.00
VAR149.  Chasseur Cheval of the Guard by Jim Lancia.
Chasseur Cheval of the Guard by Jim Lancia.
Half Price! - £30.00

DHM396.  The Wounded Cuirassier by Theodore Gericault.
The Wounded Cuirassier by Theodore Gericault.
Half Price! - £25.00
 USS Kearsarge CV33, USS Princeton and USS Rochester  CA124 in Korea 1952 with bearcats over the top.

USS Kearsarge by Randall Wilson (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
GIDT2259GL. Glen Fallock, 1872 by Richard Sidney Percy.
Glen Fallock, 1872 by Richard Sidney Percy. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
GISD2426GL. The Cliffs of Moen, Denmark 1852 by Peter Christian Skovgaard.
The Cliffs of Moen, Denmark 1852 by Peter Christian Skovgaard. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

Latest Military Art Releases

  Towards the end of the second battle of Cambrai, British Mark IV tanks of 12th Battalion confronted German captured Mark IVs. The ensuing battle was chaotic, emerging from smoke the Germans were initially mistaken as part of C Company, but at 50 meters both sides recovered from their surprise and opened fire simultaneously. The lead British tank L16 commanded by Captain Rowe was immediately knocked out, who escaped with his men to L19 just in time to see it destroyed, along with L12. The remaining tank L8 had broken down some distance back taking no part in the battle, although its commander Lieutenant Martel managed to use a captured 77mm artillery piece to finally halt the German tank.

Unexpected encounter at Niergnies, France, 8th October 1918 by David Pentland. (PC)
  Fourteen A7V Sturmpanzerwagen and supporting infantry led the final push towards the strategic allied supply hub of Amiens. The panzers were divided into 3 groups, the first Skopnik with 3 tanks attacked and took Villers Bretoneux. The second group Uihlein of seven tanks struck towards the Bois DAquenne, while the third group Steinhardt comprising Elfriede, Nixe, Siegfried and Schnuck drove towards Cachy. The attack may well have succeeded but for the unexpected intervention of Britsh Mk IV and medium Whippet tanks.

The New War Elephants, Cachy, France 24th April 1918 by David Pentland. (PC)
 St. Charmond Assault tanks of the French 10th Heavy Tank battalion move through Villers-Cotterets forest in preparation for the 10th Army counterattack on the German Soissons-Rheims salient.

A Saint goes to War - The Second Marne Offensive, France 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (PC)
 Schneider CA1 Tanks of the French tenth army spearhead the successful counter offensive against the German army on the river Marne. Overhead a tenacious Junkers JI artillery spotter dogs their tracks. The Second Battle of the Marne, though not an overwhelming victory, spelt the end of German successes on the Western front, and a turning point for the allies.

Tanks on the Marne - France, 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (PC)

Latest Aviation Art Releases

The Luftwaffe had done everything in its power to pummel London into submission but they failed. By the end of September 1940 their losses were mounting. For weeks since the early days of September, London had been the main target for the Luftwaffe and during that time Luftwaffe High Command had grown increasingly despondent as their losses steadily mounted. Far from being on the brink of collapse RAF Fighter Command, though vastly outnumbered, had shown an incredible resilience. The fighting had reached a dramatic climax on Sunday 15th September when, bloodied and bruised, the Luftwaffe had lost the upper hand on a day of intense combat that had culminated with a humiliating retreat. Almost every day that had passed since then had seen the Luftwaffe do everything in its power to pummel London and regain the initiative, but the daylight raids were becoming increasingly costly. On Friday 27th September, 80 days after the Battle of Britain had officially begun, the Luftwaffe came once more, this time concentrating on the fastest bombers they had - Ju88s and Bf110s. And they came in force, principally targeting London and Bristol. Anthony Saunders' superb painting depicts one of these raids, this time by bombers from KG77 as they head over the Medway Estuary, east of the City of London, in an attempt to attack the capital's warehouses and docks. Among the many units defending the capital that day was 92 Squadron from Biggin Hill and Anthony portrays the Spitfire of Pilot Officer Geoffrey Wellum in his dramatic piece. With a deft flick of the rudder Wellum banks his fighter away to port seconds after sharing in the destruction of a Ju88. It was just one of more than 50 German aircraft destroyed by the RAF during the day.
Decisive Blow by Anthony Saunders.
 Despite having sight in just one eye, Major Edward Mick Mannock was to become one of the most decorated and celebrated aces of World War 1, bringing down an official 61 enemy aircraft in just eighteen months before himself being brought down in flames by enemy ground fire. He was reluctant to add shared kills to his tally, so his actual total of victories is recorded at 73. His decorations include the VC, DSO and 2 Bars, MC and Bar and he is depicted here diving on enemy aircraft in SE5a D278 of 74 Sqn in April, 1918.

Major Edward Mannock by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Mystery still surrounds just why Manfred von Richthofen risked so much in chasing the novice pilot Wilfred Wop May into Allied-occupied territory on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1918, but it was to be his last flight, this error of judgement costing him his life. Von Richthofen had broken from the main fight involving Sopwith Camels of 209 Sqn to chase Mays aircraft, but found himself under attack from the Camel of Captain Roy Brown. All three aircraft turned and weaved low along the Somme River, the all red Triplane coming under intense fire from the ground as well as from Browns aircraft. No one knows exactly who fired the crucial bullet, but Manfred von Richthofens aircraft was seen to dive suddenly and impact with the ground. The Red Baron was dead and his amazing run of 80 victories was over. The painting shows Mays aircraft (D3326) in the extreme distance, pursued by DR.1 (425/17) and Browns Camel (B7270) in the foreground.

Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The exploits of the partnership of McKeever and Powell in their 11 Squadron Bristol F.2B made them perhaps the most celebrated of all the Bristol Fighter crews, McKeever himself becoming the highest scoring exponent of this classic type with a closing tally of 31 victories. Powell was to secure a further 19 kills before both were withdrawn from front line service to Home Establishment in January 1918. Whilst on a lone patrol above enemy lines in November 1917, their aircraft (A7288) was attacked by two German two-seaters and seven Albatross scouts, four of which were sent to the ground through a combination of superb airmanship and outstanding gunnery. The remaining German aircraft continued to give chase until the F.2B was down to less than 20ft above the British trenches, at which point the Germans broke off their attack and fled.

Captain Andrew McKeever and 2nd Lieutenant Leslie Powell by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

Latest Naval Art Releases

 In January 1941, the young Mario Arillo was appointed the rank of Lieutenant Commander, placed in charge of the Regia Marina's submarine <i>Ambra</i> and was dispatched to the Mediterranean to help disrupt supplies to the Allied forces.  In May of that same year, Arillo attacked the British Dido Class Cruiser <i>HMS Bonaventure</i>, and Destroyers <i>HMS Hereward</i> and <i>HMS Stuart</i>, south of Crete, en route from Alexandria, the cruiser <i>Bonaventure</i> being sunk with great loss of life.  The <i>Ambra</i> is depicted here in a calmer moment, two of her crew scanning the horizon for 'business'.

Hunter's Dusk by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Under the command of Gianfranco Gazzana-Priaroggia, the Regia Marina submarine Leonardo da Vinci was to become the most successful non-German submarine of World War Two.  On 21st April 1943, she encountered the liberty ship SS John Drayton which was returning, unladen, to Capetown from Bahrain and put two torpedoes into her before surfacing to finish her off with shells.  The deadly reign of terror wrought by the combination of Gazzana-Priaroggia and his submarine came to an end just one month later when the Leonardo da Vinci was sunk by HMS Active and HMS Ness off Cape Finistere.

Scourge of the Deep - Leonardo da Vinci by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Sitting menacingly at a depth of 15 metres below the surface, just 2 km outside the heavily defended harbour of Alexandria, the Italian submarine Scire is shown releasing her three manned torpedoes, or <i>Maiali</i>, at the outset of their daring raid in which the British battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Valiant and a tanker, were severely damaged on 3rd December 1941.  All six crew members of the three <i>Maiali</i> survived the mission, but all were captured and taken prisoner.  Luigi Durand de la Penne and Emilio Bianchi can be seen moving away aboard 221, whilst Vincenzo Martellotta and Mario Marino (222) carry out systems checks.  Antonio Marceglia and Spartaco Schergat, on 223, are heading away at the top of the picture.

Assault from the Deep by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 A Type VIIC U-Boat slips quietly toward the open sea from her pen at Lorient, France in 1942.

Dawn Departure by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

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SPECIAL FEATURE - THE DAMBUSTERS
We have produced a series of four articles to coincide with the 70th anniversary of the Dambusters raid in May 1943.  These articles tackle the chronological events of the mission through artwork, with commentary, aircraft details and crew details.  Every crew member and every aircraft is detailed in over 70 pieces of artwork.  See the articles on the links below.

Part 1 : From Preparations to the Dutch Coast
Part 2 : From the Coast to the Dams
Part 3 : The Attack on the Mohne
Part 4: The Eder and Beyond

 

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