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PUBLISHING   MILITARY   ART   FOR   OVER   TWENTY   YEARS

Largest publisher of military, naval and aviation art, and leading distributor of sport, wildlife and landscape art.  Select from over 18,000 images, over half of which are exclusive to Cranston Fine Arts, and including over 400 original paintings by many of the world's leading artists, all available from our massive online shop.

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Publishing historical art since 1985

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Top 10 Aircraft :
 
New Print Packs
British Spitfire Fighter Prints.
The

The Fledgling by Ivan Berryman. (I)
Dawn

Dawn Sortie by Gerald Coulson.
Save £180!
Chris Collingwood Napoleonic Prints.
The

The Defence of La Haye-Sainte, 18th June 1815 by Chris Collingwood.
Lt

Lt General Lord Wellington at Salamanca, 22nd July 1812 by Chris Collingwood.
Save £160!
WW2 Spitfire Aircraft Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
Normandy

Normandy Breakout by Nicolas Trudgian.
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save £260!
Nicolas Trudgian Spitfire Print Pack.
Victory

Victory Over the Rhine by Nicolas Trudgian.
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save £240!
Sailing Ships Prints by Robert Taylor and Roy Cross.
Flying

Flying Cloud by Robert Taylor.
Aurelia

Aurelia at Camden Maine by Roy Cross.
Save £23!

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GET A FREE PRINT WITH OVER 1,300 OF OUR PRINTS!

We are giving away a free related print with over 1,300 of the prints available from this website, adding value you can't get anywhere else.  In the example above, buy Anthony Saunders' recent release 'The Breach' and get another print of the same aircraft on the same raid absolutely free.  As you browse using the menus at the top of the page, you will see these free prints clearly marked on the item pages, along with the saving being made - sometimes well over £100!

This Week's Half Price Offers

 LCT (Landing Craft Tank) 312 is shown unloading a Sherman tank directly onto the beach during the Normandy landings of June 1944. Over 1,000 of these versatile craft were built in the United States, with a small number being constructed in the UK and Canada.

LCT 312 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £55.00
 HMS Norfolk and HMS Belfast of Force I are shown engaging the Scharnhorst which has already been hit and disabled by both HMS Duke of York and the cruiser HMS Jamaica.  Scharnhorst was never to escape the clutches of the British and Norwegian forces for, having been slowed to just a few knots by numerous hits, fell victim to repeated torpedo attacks by the allied cruisers and destroyers that had trapped the German marauder.

HMS Norfolk at the Battle of the North Cape by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 On the 1st of August 1798, thirteen French ships of the line sat anchored in Aboukir Bay off the coast of Alexandria, Egypt, in support of Napoleon who was inland with his troops attempting to conquer the country. As nighttime approached so did Lord Horatio Nelson and the British fleet. Nelson had been hunting Napoleon at sea for months; at Aboukir Bay he had found the French fleet, trapped and unprepared for battle. Nelsons audacious plan was to attack the French on their unprotected prot side, the plan had its risks; the whole of the British fleet could run aground in the shallows - but Nelson knew the waters too well. The Battle of the Nile was one of the most decisive in the history of naval warfare. By the end of the battle nearly all the French ships were sunk or captured. The 124-gun flagship - and the pride of the French navy - LOrient, had exploded with such ferocity that it halted the battle for over ten minutes. Napoleons ability to dominate the region had been crushed, whilst Nelson was to become a hero throughout the whole of Britain.

Battle of the Nile by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
Half Price! - £305.00
Charles II rides out to lead his army. Including many Scots who fought on his side.

Battle of Worcester, 3rd September 1651 by Chris Collingwood. (B)
Half Price! - £45.00

 The Pak 40 - a hard hitting 75mm German anti-tank gun-seen here mounted on an SPW for greater battlefield mobility was essentially a scaled up version of the PaK 38 debuted in Russia where it was needed to combat the newest Soviet tanks there.  It was designed to fire the same low-capacity APCBC, HE and HL projectiles which had been standardized for usage in the long barreled KwK 40 tank guns.

Pak40 Mounted on SPW Half-Track by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - £340.00
 Blackbeard the Terrible, otherwise known as Edward Teach, Thatch or Drummond. Circa 1718.

Damnation Seize My Soul by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Depicting one of the nighttime Zulu attacks on Rorkes Drift. The South Wales Borderers defend the outpost by the light of the burning hospital building.

Night of the Zulu by Bud Bradshaw. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00
 R5689 (VN-N) - a Lancaster B.1 of 50 Squadron based at Swinderby. This aircraft crash-landed in Lincolnshire while returning from a mission on 19th September 1942, after both port engines failed as the aircraft was preparing to land. The aircraft never flew again. The crew on the final mission were : <br>Sgt E J Morley RAAF,<br>P/O G W M Harrison,<br>Sgt H Male,<br>Sgt S C Garrett,
<br>Sgt J W Dalby,<br>Sgt J Fraser<br>and<br>Sgt J R Gibbons RCAF, the sole member of the crew killed in the crash.

Avro Lancaster B.1 by Ivan Berryman. (I)
Half Price! - £120.00

Latest Military Art Releases

 On the evening of 5th June 1944, at a dozen airfields across southern England, more than 13,000 American paratroopers prepared themselves for a mission that would change the course of history.  The next morning these brave young men found themselves at the forefront of the bitter fighting to secure the right flank of the Normandy beach-head.  The odds against them were huge and, if they failed, the American amphibious landings on Utah and Omaha beaches would face disaster - the destiny of the US First Army rested squarely on the shoulders of the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions.

Final Roster by Anthony Saunders.
 Private and Officer - Royal Army Medical Corps, Surgeon-General - Army Medical Staff, Sergeant-Major - Royal Army Medical Corps.

Army Medical Corps by Richard Simkin
 Bridging, Review and Marching Order - Officers, Review Order - Field-Officer and Sapper, Constructing Shelter Trench.

Volunteer Royal Engineers by Richard Simkin
 Undress - Officer, Review Order - Field Officer and Officer, Review Order - 16 Pounder Rifled Muzzle-Loading Field Gun and Detachment.

Volunteer Royal Artillery by Richard Simkin

Latest Aviation Art Releases

 IAF Squadron Commander Avaham Lanir, flying an Israeli Air Force Mirage III high over the Syrian desert, scores a victory over a Syrian MiG-21 on 9 November 1972. Later, during the Yom Kippur War, his Mirage was hit by a Syrian missile ambush, forcing him to eject over enemy territory. Despite valiant efforts to rescue him, he was captured by the Syrians and died under interrogation.
Desert Victory by Robert Taylor.
 June 1940 and the freedom of Britain lay in the hands of a small band of young RAF fighter pilots. Facing them across the Channel, the all-conquering Luftwaffe stood in eager anticipation of an easy victory, one that would allow were Hitler's mighty armies to invade. So heavily were the odds stacked against the RAF, few gave Fighter Command a chance. The American ambassador to Britain reported that <i>democracy is finished in England</i>. He was wrong.  Although outnumbered more than five to one at the outset, as the savage aerial battles raged continuously over southern England, the courage and dedication of Fighter Command's young airmen gradually turned the tide. By the end of September the battle was won and, for the first time, the Luftwaffe had tasted defeat.  Richard Taylor's outstanding composition portrays a more reflective image of those heroic RAF fighter pilots in contrast perhaps to the deadly trials they faced on a daily basis. Just occasionally during that long hot summer of 1940 were rare moments of peaceful respite. Every minute off-duty was time to be savoured, especially for this particular young fighter pilot and his girl as they briefly pause along a quiet country lane to watch the Spitfires from 92 Squadron pass low overhead. For a few moments the distinctive roar of Merlin engines shatters the peace and they both know that this time tomorrow it will be him who will be flying into combat.
Quiet Reflection by Richard Taylor.
 March 1944 and heavy snow has settled firmly over the frozen Lincolnshire countryside around RAF Fiskerton. For once the Lancasters of 49 Squadron stand quietly idle at their dispersal points around the perimeter of the airfield. It is a scene recreated at many other heavy bomber airfields across the east of England and the young airmen who crew these mighty machines now wait patiently for the inevitable thaw that will soon see them in combat again.  For some, however, the future is uncertain. Just a few weeks later, on 30 March 1944, during a raid on Nuremberg, more than 100 bombers would be shot down. In the space of a single night Bomber Command would suffer more men lost than Fighter Command during the entire Battle of Britain.  Bomber Command flew more than 389,000 sorties from 101 operational bases across the east of England during WWII and the aircrew that undertook these missions came from Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Rhodesia and many countries under Nazi occupation. Every airman was a volunteer and with an average age of just 22 they were forced to grow up quickly, enduring frightening odds and suffering terrible losses - only the Nazi U-Boat force experienced a higher casualty rate.  Of the 125,000 men who served, 55,573 were killed. For every 100 airmen who joined Bomber Command, 45 would lose their lives, 6 would be seriously wounded and 8 made prisoners of war. Yet they resolutely overcame the overwhelming forces stacked against them, including some of the worst flying conditions imaginable and, never flinching from their task, flew until victory was finally achieved.
Ops On Hold by Richard Taylor.
 Yom Kippur - the Day of Atonement - is the holiest day in the Hebrew calendar and in Israel is marked by a national holiday but on that day in 1973 the unexpected happened. At 14.00 hours on 6 October the coalition of Arab states led by Egypt and Syria launched a surprise attack on Israeli positions. Thousands of Egyptian troops swarmed across the Suez Canal into Israeli held Sinai whilst in the north nearly 1,500 Syrian tanks backed by artillery thrust west towards Israel. Facing this sudden surprise attack on the Golan Heights were less than 200 Israeli tanks. In the air, too, Egyptian and Syrian air forces struck in a single, co-ordinated assault hitting the Israeli anti-aircraft defences and hoping to deliver a fatal blow.  Largely unprepared, Israel reeled however within hours it mobilised its fighting reserves and began a ferocious battle to stem the enemies advance. As Israeli tanks and infantry rushed to hold the front line and, in the north, push the enemy back, Israeli Air Force jets overhead fought a heroic battle to regain the initiative and control of the skies. It was grim work. Both Egyptian and Syrian forces were equipped with hundreds of Soviet-supplied SAM missiles but the tide of war was turning and a battered Israeli Air Force now went on the counter-offensive. And amongst their main targets were the heavily-defended Egyptian air bases that lay deep in the Nile delta.  Robert Taylor's powerful and dramatic painting depicts one such strike that took place on 14 October 1973, half way through the war, when Israeli F-4 Phantom fighter-bombers made simultaneous strikes against the Egyptian air bases at Mansoura and Tanta north of Cairo.  After the first wave struck the elite Egyptian MiG-21 units at El Mansoura, the other Phantom squadrons attacked Tanta in waves, turning to dog-fighting immediately after dropping their ordnance. Tanta was also home to two squadrons of Libyan Mirage 5s and the furious air battle that ensued involved countless fighter aircraft. Despite bitter opposition, the successful IAF missions eliminated much of the effectiveness of the Egyptian Air Force and its Libyan allies.
Double Strike by Robert Taylor.

Latest Naval Art Releases

 Built at Toulon in 1803, Bucentaure was the flagship of Admiral Villeneuve at the Battle of Trafalgar on 21st October 1805 and the first to be almost completely disabled by a massive broadside from HMS Victory as Nelson broke through the enemy line.  Bucentaure was taken as a prize by the British fleet, but was lost in the great storm that followed the battle.

Bucentaure by Ivan Berryman.
 One of the most iconic ships of all time and now beautifully restored to her 1805 condition at Portsmouth, Nelson's flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar, HMS Victory, is seen here departing Portsmouth Harbour with the frigate Euryalus.

Farewell, Old Portsmouth by Ivan Berryman.
 Launched in 1797, the USS Constitution was the third of her class to be constructed at Edmund Hartt's shipyard in Boston, Massachusetts, this fine ship spending most of her early years in local waters, protecting merchantmen from French marauders.  She is best remembered, however, for her decisive conquests against British ships during the war of 1812, among them the Guerriere against whom the Constitution gained her nickname 'Old Ironsides'.  She continued to serve until 1881 and is still afloat today, the oldest seagoing warship in the world.

USS Constitution - 'Old Ironsides' by Ivan Berryman.
 Arguably the best known warship in the world, and one of only a few survivors of her era, HMS Victory was the flagship of Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson at Trafalgar in 1805, leading the victorious British fleet into battle against the combined French and Spanish navies.  Severely damaged during the battle, she remained afloat at Portsmouth into the 20th century and is now preserved there in dry dock for future generations to visit.  Extraordinarily, HMS Victory is still a commissioned ship in the Royal Navy and is frequently used for ceremonial duties.

HMS Victory by Ivan Berryman.

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SPECIAL FEATURE - THE DAMBUSTERS
We have produced a series of four articles to coincide with the 70th anniversary of the Dambusters raid in May 1943.  These articles tackle the chronological events of the mission through artwork, with commentary, aircraft details and crew details.  Every crew member and every aircraft is detailed in over 70 pieces of artwork.  See the articles on the links below.

Part 1 : From Preparations to the Dutch Coast
Part 2 : From the Coast to the Dams
Part 3 : The Attack on the Mohne
Part 4: The Eder and Beyond

 

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