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PUBLISHING   MILITARY   ART   FOR   OVER   TWENTY   YEARS

Largest publisher of military, naval and aviation art, and leading distributor of sport, wildlife and landscape art.  Select from over 18,000 images, over half of which are exclusive to Cranston Fine Arts, and including over 400 original paintings by many of the world's leading artists, all available from our massive online shop.

 


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

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Top 10 Aircraft :
 
New Print Packs
Richard III and Battle of Bosworth Military Print Pack.
Battle

Battle of Bosworth by Brian Palmer.
Richard

Richard III by Chris Collingwood.
Save £175!
Nicolas Trudgian Railway Art Prints.
Spirit

Spirit of the Mountain by Nicolas Trudgian
Canyon

Canyon of Lost Souls by Nicolas Trudgian
Save £155!
Battle of Waterloo Napoleon and Wellington Military Prints.
The

The Battle of Waterloo by Robert Hillingford (B)
Napoleons

Napoleons Last Grand Attack by Ernest Crofts (B)
Save £45!
Spitfire Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
First

First Flap of the Day by Nicolas Trudgian. (C)
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save £210!
Spitfire Print Pack by Nicolas Trudgian.
Winter
Winter of 41 by Nicolas Trudgian.
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save £230!

GET A FREE PRINT WITH OVER 1,300 OF OUR PRINTS!

We are giving away a free related print with over 1,300 of the prints available from this website, adding value you can't get anywhere else.  In the example above, buy Anthony Saunders' recent release 'The Breach' and get another print of the same aircraft on the same raid absolutely free.  As you browse using the menus at the top of the page, you will see these free prints clearly marked on the item pages, along with the saving being made - sometimes well over £100!

This Week's Half Price Offers

German Stosstruppen of the 18th Army, having broken through the British lines near St Quentin, engage secondary trench lines occupied by men of the 9th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (36th Ulster Division) . Similar attacks occurred right across the BEFs front, where the new tactics of short bombardments, infiltration, close air support, and non persistent gas had ripped open the British lines.

The Kaisers Battle, Operation Michael, France, 21st March 1918 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
GIJL8370GL.  The Grass-Crowned Headland off a Rocky Shore by Peter Graham.
The Grass-Crowned Headland off a Rocky Shore by Peter Graham (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
GILB0636GS. Noble Man on Horseback by Alfred de Dreux.
Noble Man on Horseback by Alfred de Dreux. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
The second battle of Acre the Turkish Army of 60,000 horsemen and 100,000 foot soldiers laid siege to the city. Eventually the Marmalukes took the outer wall on May 15th and three days later stormed the inner gates, bursting into the city and most of the Christian defenders died fighting them. Acre was thoroughly destroyed and all fortifications demolished, May 18th 1291.

Guillaume de Clermont defending Ptolemais (Acre) 1291 by Dominque Louis.
Half Price! - £30.00

DHM642. The Battle of Wagram 6th July 1809 by Emil Adam.
The Battle of Wagram 6th July 1809 by Emil Adam
Half Price! - £30.00
 Hercules C130 of the Royal Air Force.
Red Flag (Sport of Kings) by Phil McGinness (P)
Half Price! - £1200.00
 USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) refuels an Adams class Destroyer during a dusk operation off the Vietnam coast as a pair of E8 Crusaders are readied for launch on the forward catapults.

USS Kitty Hawk by Ivan Berryman (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
GITW2366GL. Ludgate - Evening, 1887 by John OConnor.
Ludgate - Evening, 1887 by John OConnor. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

Latest Military Art Releases

 The Inniskilling Dragoons capturing a German railway gun at Harbonnieres during the battle of Amiens, 1918.

Inniskilling Dragoons at Amiens by Jason Askew. (PC)


The Charge of the Scots Greys at Waterloo - Sgt Ewart Captures the French Eagle by Jason Askew. (PC)


The Inniskillings at Waterloo by Jason Askew. (PC)
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (PC)

Latest Aviation Art Releases

 With his personal emblem of black and white fuselage band adorning his Fokker E.V, 153/18, Richard Wenzl briefly commanded Jasta 6, based at Bernes in August 1918, and claimed a modest 6 victories during his career with JG 1. The Fokker E.V was both fast and manoeuvrable, but a series of engine and structural failures meant that these exciting new machines saw only brief service before being re-worked to emerge as the D.VIII, sadly too late to make any impression on the war. Wenzl is shown here in combat with Sopwith Camels of 203 Sqn, assisted by Fokker D.VIIs, which served alongside the E.Vs of Jasta 6. The D.VII shown is that of Ltn d R Erich Just of Jasta 11, also based at Bernes.

Leutnant d R Richard Wenzl by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Aircraft of Jasta 10 prepare to taxi out for a dawn patrol, led by the fearless Leutnant Werner Voss in his Fokker F1 103/17 in September 1917. Arguments still rage concerning the colour of the engine cowling on his Triplane. Certainly, when the aircraft was delivered, its upper surfaces were painted factory finish streaked green and, it is recorded that it was flown as delivered with Voss personal mechanic noting that no extra painting was undertaken, aside from Voss Japanese kite face which occupied the nose.  However, research shows that by the time of Voss death on 23rd September 1917, after his epic battle with SE5s of 56 Sqn, the cowling was probably yellow in keeping with all Jasta 10 aircraft. Renowned by pilots from both sides for his bravery and extraordinary abilities with his diminutive Triplane, the young ace scored a total of 48 confirmed victories before being brought down by Lieutenant Rhys Davids on the very day that he was due to go on leave.  The Fokker F1 differed from the production DR.1 in detail only, Voss machine being fitted with a captured 110hp Le Rhone engine, his aircraft not being fitted with the outer wing skids common to the DR.1.

Leutnant Werner Voss by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Germanys greatest exponent of the Fokker Dr1 Triplane, Leutnant Josef Jacobs is depicted chatting with colleagues of Jasta 7 before a sortie in the spring of 1918.  His black Triplane became well known to allied pilots, not least because of his formidable kill rate.  By the end of the war, still aged just 24, Jacobs had claimed 48 enemy aircraft destroyed.  The unusual practice of applying the black cross to the upper sides of the lower wings was to counter friendly fire from other German aircraft who frequently mistook the Dr1 for a Sopwith Triplane.

Leutnant Josef Jacobs by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
Synonymous with both World Wars, the young Hermann Goring scored his first victory on 16th November 1915, shooting down a Maurice Farman over Tahure. A year later, he was injured in combat, but managed to land his bullet-riddled aircraft near a field hospital. Goring steadily increased his score to an eventual 22 victories and is shown here on patrol in his characteristic all-white Fokker D.VII.

Oberleutnant Hermann Goring by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

Latest Naval Art Releases

 The mainstay of the Royal Navy's Coastal Forces fleet from 1941, the 72-foot Vosper MTBs were among the fastest and most successful ever built. With their three Packard 1400hp engines and bigger fuel tanks, these boats could reach speeds of up to 39 knots with a maximum range of 400 miles. Armament varied from boat to boat, but those depicted are fitted with the standard 21-inch torpedo tubes and a twin .5 inch MkV Vickers machine gun mounting. Crew was typically two officers and eleven ratings.

On the Step by Ivan Berryman.
 Under the command of Gianfranco Gazzana-Priaroggia, the Regia Marina submarine Leonardo da Vinci was to become the most successful non-German submarine of World War Two.  On 21st April 1943, she encountered the liberty ship SS John Drayton which was returning, unladen, to Capetown from Bahrain and put two torpedoes into her before surfacing to finish her off with shells.  The deadly reign of terror wrought by the combination of Gazzana-Priaroggia and his submarine came to an end just one month later when the Leonardo da Vinci was sunk by HMS Active and HMS Ness off Cape Finistere.

Scourge of the Deep - Leonardo da Vinci by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Sitting menacingly at a depth of 15 metres below the surface, just 2 km outside the heavily defended harbour of Alexandria, the Italian submarine Scire is shown releasing her three manned torpedoes, or <i>Maiali</i>, at the outset of their daring raid in which the British battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Valiant and a tanker, were severely damaged on 3rd December 1941.  All six crew members of the three <i>Maiali</i> survived the mission, but all were captured and taken prisoner.  Luigi Durand de la Penne and Emilio Bianchi can be seen moving away aboard 221, whilst Vincenzo Martellotta and Mario Marino (222) carry out systems checks.  Antonio Marceglia and Spartaco Schergat, on 223, are heading away at the top of the picture.

Assault from the Deep by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 A Type VIIC U-Boat slips quietly toward the open sea from her pen at Lorient, France in 1942.

Dawn Departure by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

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SPECIAL FEATURE - THE DAMBUSTERS
We have produced a series of four articles to coincide with the 70th anniversary of the Dambusters raid in May 1943.  These articles tackle the chronological events of the mission through artwork, with commentary, aircraft details and crew details.  Every crew member and every aircraft is detailed in over 70 pieces of artwork.  See the articles on the links below.

Part 1 : From Preparations to the Dutch Coast
Part 2 : From the Coast to the Dams
Part 3 : The Attack on the Mohne
Part 4: The Eder and Beyond

 

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