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Mark Churms

Mark was born in Wales in 1967. He gained his degree in Architectural Studies at Oxford Polytechnic in 1989, but soon his interest in drawing buildings was surpassed by his love of painting horses and in 1991 he began work as a freelance artist. His first commissions were for sporting subjects, Polo, Racing and Hunting. However his consuming passion for military history, particularly of the Napoleonic era, quickly became his dominant theme, with the invaluable counsel of French military experts (accuracy in uniform and terrain of the various battles takes a great deal of time and consultation with many experts across Europe). Mark Churms joined Cranston Fine Arts in 1991 and for a period of 8 years, was commissioned for several series and special commissions. His series of the Zulu War, and of the Battle of Waterloo were the highlights during this period. Mark Churms' deep understanding and detailed knowledge of the period made Mark at that time one of the most prolific and successfull artists for Cranston Fine Arts. Cranston Fine Arts are proud with their series of superb art prints and original paintings painted by Mark Churms in this period. We now offer Mark Churms art prints in special 2 and 4 print packs with great discounts as well as a number of selected original paintings at upto half price.

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Depicting General La Salle before his last charge before being killed at the Battle of Wagram.
La Salle at the Battle of Wagram by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0249
Captain Montague Lind, leading a Squadron of the 1st Life Guards against the 12th regiment of Cuirassiers during the battle of waterloo, Hougoumont Farm can be seen in the distance.
Charge of the Life Guards at the Battle of Waterloo by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0251
Depicting Jeromes Infantry attacking the South gate of the Chateau during the battle of Waterloo.
Hougoumont by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0252
Icy rain adds its misery to the bitter conflict on Drumossie Moor. In the shadow of the Black Isle, two English ships on the waters of the Moray Firth, await the outcome of the decisive battle. Pounded by Cumberlands gunners and raked by steady musketry, the Princes brave men can make no headway. Although the Irish and French regulars refuse to give ground, the Jacobite lines gradually disintegrate. Tired, cold and hungry men flea past Culloden House for the relative safety of Inverness. On the Scottish right the Argyll Militia, supported by Hawleys Dragoons, tear down the walls of the Culwiniac and Culchunaig enclosures in an outflanking attack. Avochies men offer some resistance but Major Gillies McBean stands alone on the breach. He cuts down more than a dozen Argylls, including Lord Robert Kerr, who lies mortally wounded, but his foes are too many. The hero eventually falls to a vicious cut to the forehead, his thigh bone is also broken. Despite the cries of a mounted officer to save that brave man, the major is ruthlessly bayonetted, his back against the wall. The victory is complete and nothing more can be done. In the distance, the Young Pretender is forced to abandon the field and Scotlands hope of claiming the British Throne.
(Detail from) The Battle of Culloden by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0254
The decisive battle of the War of the Roses was fought near Market Bosworth. Richard of Gloucester, the last Plantagenate King of England was to try consequences with Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. The bloody conflict began in the traditional manner with the opposing armies drawn up in line. facing one another, except for the forces of Thomas Neville, Lord Stanley, as yeyt uncommitted to either side. King Richard, the Third of that name, is seated astride his grey charger in his fine blued harness. He is accompanied by his personal standard and the royal standard, alongside that of Lord Zouch to his right. His herald, trumpet are at his side. To his left Richards Chamberlain and Admiral, Viscount Lord Lovel, sits ready, astride his mount. To the rear we see the rest of the household and choice force of cavalry, kept out of shot to avoid unnecessary casualties amongst the expensive war horses.  After the opening deadly arrow storm, boys hurriedly collect fallen arrows for Richards men to shoot back. In the front line crossbowmen return fire from behind the safety of their decorated pavaises (painted with the suns and white roses of York and the white boar, Richards badge). Close by a gentleman at arms, mortally wounded by an iron ball fired from a hand gonne is dragged from the field by his page. Sir Walter Devereux (Lord Ferrers) accompanied by his standard is encouraging his household (soldiers wearing his livery colours ) to attack.  However, there is a marked reluctance on both sides to join the vicious close quarter combat of handstrokes and only in the centre is there any heavy fighting. Richard is informed by his herald that Henry and his household have been recognised and are now within charge distance. Faced with his armies reluctance to come to grips with the enemy, he decides to force battle himself by leading his own household, the Choice Force, in a desperate charge against Henry seeking to engage him in single combat.  Characteristically leading from the front Richard slays many a knight, including William Brandon (Henrys standard bearer) in his vain attempt to kill his rival. At this crucial moment Lord Stanley decides to join Henrys cause, attacks the choice force and drives it from the field. In the brutal hand to hand fighting the king is unhorsed and though surrounded, fights to the end.  -KingRichard alone was killed fighting manfully in the thickest press of his enemies - his courage was high and fierce and failed him not even at the death which when his men forsook him, he preferred to take by the sword, rather than by foul flight to prolong his life- (Polydore Virgil)
Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0255
Robert The Bruce dispatches Sir Henry De Bohun before the Battle of Bannockburn. Far ahead of Edward IIs main army, marching from Falkirk to relieve Stirling Castle, rides the English vanguard. Late on that day, 23rd June 1314, these horsemen advance along the Roman road and cross Bannockburn. Eager for combat Gloucesters bold Barons and Knights spur on their chargers towards the gathered Scottish infantry. Robert the Bruce, King of Scots, not yet fully dressed for battle, sits astride a grey pony. He rides out ahead of his formations to observe the enemys advance. One of the English Knights, Sir Henry De Bohun, seeing the Kings vulnerable position, gallops ahead of his fellows to engage Bruce in single combat. Undaunted, the King holds his ground. Skillfully turning his mount away from the thrust of the Knights deadly lance in one movement he swings his battle axe down upon his enemys head with such force that the handle is shattered and the unfortunate attackers skull is split in two. In triumph, Bruce returns to the cheers of his countrymen who before the day is out will soon deliver a similar fate upon many other English noblemen. As the light fades the Riders retire but both armies know well that the main battle of Bannockburn has yet to begin.
In Single Combat by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0257
At about 2.00pm the Union Brigade crashes through the ranks on Napoleons Ist Infantry Corps. The 2nd Royal North British Dragoons (later known as The Scots Greys) on the far left of the line, plow through Marcognets division, only Duruttes division will escape intact. With Brigade General Ponsortby at their head, elements of the now disordered Cavalry charge on to the French artillery.  Even though, at close quarters, the Gunners and attached Infantry are no match for the wild Scots, they desperately try to save their 12 pounder field pieces. However the British heavy Cavalry is now out of control and Napoleons retribution will be swift.  From the undulating ground before Paillotte comes the thunder of hooves and the deadly lances of 4th Regiment and the 3th Chasseurs a Cheval. In the confusion many of the British soldiers are completely unaware of the onslaught as the fresh French Cavalry sweeps through their flank.  Ponsonbys mount leaps through the mud as the exhausted Brigade is herded together for the final kill.  Even against all odds the brave men continue to fight. The Brigade General himself will shortly be sabred by Sergeant Urban as he attempts to capture the eagle of the 4th Lancers.
Charge of the Union Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0258
P269.  Knightsbridge No.1 Turnout by Mark Churms.
Knightsbridge No.1 Turnout by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0269
Supported by the Highland Chiefs with twelve hundred highlanders present. Prince Charles Edward Stuart raised his standard at Glenfinnan on the 19th August 1745. This was the start of the Forty Five which would end with the defeat of the Jacobite Army on Drumossie Moor at the battle of Culloden 16th April 1746.
Raising the Standard at Glenfinnan by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0297
With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge.  Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death.  With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete.
Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.
(Detail from) The Battle of Bannockburn by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0298
The Storming party, 750 volunteers, included 200 men of the Guards, one hundred each from the First and Coldstream Guards. They moved off at two in the morning on the 31st August 1813, and occupied a ruined convent where they remained till half past nine. Aware of the almost impossible task ahead of them, and subjected to a violent electric thunderstorm, the troops waited in a state of savage anticipation. Wild senseless laughter was said to have preceded the attack on the breach which could not be entered except in single file under heavy fire. The troops attacked in succession, but were struck down by hundreds. General Graham then ordered the artillery to fire over the heads of the assailants, clearing the ramparts. A shell ignited a quantity of powder, and under cover of the explosions, the storming party forced its way into the town. San Sebastian was savagely sacked and burned, and the good name of Wellingtons Army suffered as it had done at Badajoz. The civilians were raped, robbed and murdered in revenge for the heavy losses suffered by the troops. The Franco-Spanish governor retired the citadel (San Marcial) and on the 9th September, after a gallant resistance of over a week, surrendered the charge he had so faithfully defended. The casualties among the officers of the first Guards were one Officer, Ensign Burrard, First battalion (a son of Sir Henry Burrard who was responsible for the disastrous Treaty of Cintra) severely wounded, since dead, and one Officer, Ensign Orlando Bridgeman, wounded. In the Coldstream Guards, one officer ensign Thomas Chaplin, According to Lord Saltoun there were in round numbers, 150 casualties amongst 200 Guardsman. Total losses of volunteers from all regiments were 1500 men. (text by Atlanta Clifford, assistant to the Curator-The Guards Museum) In the painting. you see Ensign Chaplin lying wounded, attended by an Officer of the Coldstream Guards, Orlando Bridgeman is calling Assistant Surgeon Bacot, First Foot Guards, to go to the aid of his fellow officer, Burrard.
Assault on the Breach of San Sebastian by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0299
In the Spring of 1854 the Seventeenth lancers, the Death or Glory Boys, a nickname derived from the regiments dashingly sinister skull and crossbones badge received orders to make ready for the Crimea. The Seventeenth was to be brigaded with the 8th and 11th Hussars and the 4th and 13th Light dragoons to comprise what was said at the time to be The finest Brigade of Light cavalry ever to leave the shores of England. Prior to departure for the front. The seventeenth is reviewed by its Colonel in Chief, the Duke of Cambridge wearing scarlet full dress in contrast to the dark blue of the seventeenth. A bit of swagger before the Charge which would secure the regiments place in history.
Last Review Before the Charge by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0300
The Queens Bays engage enemy foot and horse outside Luknow, led by Major Percy Smith. The regiment was given the order to charge and pursue. The Bays thundered into action accompanied by the second Punjab cavalry. In the action Major Percy Smith was killed along with two corporals.
Charge and Pursue by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0361
After the unsuccessful march on London, Prince Charlie retreats to the safety of Scotland. The army regroups and more men come to join the cause, including soldiers from France. However King Georges men are never far away.  As dark, winter rain clouds draw in over the high ground above the town of Falkirk, the Jacobite army assembles to face Hang-man Hawleys dragoons and infantry. A piper plays on while the men of Ogilvys Regiment, in the second line, load and make ready their weapons for the coming assault. Bonnie Prince Charlie (so called for his nature, not his looks) rides down the ranks followed by Lord Elcho and his Life Guards. Red coated Irish Pickets, regulars from France, are also in reserve.
The Jacobite Piper by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0362
Through the early morning Autumn mist, Highlanders of the Appin Regiment abandon their plaids and rush headlong across fields of stubble into the stunned ranks of Jonny Copes army. The force sent by the Crown to destroy the rebellion and capture the Pretender is itself utterly routed in a matter of minutes.  The first major engagement of the uprising is a swift and complete victory for the Princes men. Except for the garrisons of Edinburgh, Stirling, Fort William and Fort Augustus, Scotland is now under the control of the Jacobites.
The Charge of the Highlanders at the Battle of Preston Pans by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0363
On the night of 6th April 1812 Wellingtons Army, surrounding the walled Spanish town of Badajoz (garrisoned by Napoleons soldiers under general Baron Philippon) is ready to attack!  The men of the 45th regiment from Pictons 3rd Division launch themselves in a desperate and bloody assault against the north castle wall. Carrying improvised ladders, the men have their top buttons undone, overalls rolled up and are stripped for action.  The castles defenders (Germans, allied to Napoleon of the Graf und Erbprinz Regiment from Hesse-Darmstadt) partroling the walls in their greatcoats are intially surprised by the bold assault from this sector but they have been preparing the strong defenses for some time. Soon the night air is full of musketry, falling masonry, burning bundles of ropes and exploding grenades or mines.  Despite the horrific casualties suffered the attackers press home. As the first scaling ladders are raised near a small bell tower the young Lt. James Macpherson reaches for the top of the wall. The ladders are too short! Undaunted he cries to his men below to lift the base of the ladder closer to the wall. This rapid, vertical movement suddenly propels him to a height several feet above the Germans heads. A shot rings out as one of the defenders fires point blank into the young mans chest. Fortunately the lead ball only strikes a glancing blow, cleaving in two a button of the officers waist coat and dislocating one of his ribs. Despite his fortunate escape, the force of the impact nearly sends him tumbling from the ladder. Somehow he maintains his grasp but the ladder itself gives way under the weight of the men following. Some unfortunates are impaled on the bayonets of their comrades below.  Leaping from the rungs of another ladder, Corporal Kelly is the first man over the top and gradually the 45th gain a foothold on the ramparts. The rest of the regiment is ordered to unfix bayonets. Using the few remaining ladders, others also manage to scale the walls. Through the carnage they climb, club and shoot their way into the castle itself!  Maepherson now regains consciousness at the foot of the wall and revived with a cup of coco from his friend A.A. General Hercules Packenham, who was directly behind him on the ladder when it broke. Though winded by the shot he rises to his feet. This sudden movement relocates his rib and he is able to climb the ladders once more. Once over the defense he sees the old towers of Apendez and Albar-rana to his left and the cathedral illuminated by gun fire in the distance. However his objective is directly ahead. Atop the abandoned tower of Santa Maria before him still flies the French tricolour.  Macplierson seizes the opportunity, mounts the spiral stairway to the top turret and pulls down the enemy flag. For want of a substitute he flies his own red jacket from the pole, signifying that the castle has fallen. In the rest of the town the fighting continues and turns into a blood lust. Badajoz is one of the bloodiest and violent sieges of the Peninsula War. On the following day Maepherson presents his trophy to the Duke of Wellington himself but his bravery is not rewarded with a promotion.
Badajoz by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0367
The Duke of Wellington at the head of the 1st Foot Guards including the Colour Party, Hyde Park, 1829, as they pass King George IV with his staff and the Duke of Orleans while the band of the 2nd Life Guards perform.  On the right of the picture is shown a Colonel of the 15th Hussars.  Behind the figures can be seen Aspley House, the residence of the Duke of Wellington.
March Past of the Grenadier Guards by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0368
Lt. John Rouse Merriot Chard, Royal Engineers.At about 3.30 on the afternoon of 22nd January 1879, Lieutenant John Rouse Merriot Chard, Royal Engineers, was supervising repairs on the military pont on the Mzinyathi river, at the border crossing at Rorkes Drift, when survivors brought news  that the advanced British camp at Isandhlwana had been over-run by the Zulus, and that a wing of the Zulu army was on its way to attack Rorkes Drift. Chard ordered Driver Robson to pack up the wagon and return to the mission station, where a stockpile of supplies was under the guard of B Company, 2/24th Regiment. Chard, in consultation with his fellow officers, made the historic decision to make a stand at Rorkes Drift.Eve of Distinction by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0370
Corporal Allen and Corporal Lyons, B. Company 2nd Battalion 24th Foot Rorkes Drift Back Wall, 6pm January 22nd 1879.  After the initial Zulu assault on the back wall of the post failed at about 4.30pm, a fire-fight broke out between Zulu snipers posted on the terraces of the Shiyane (Oskarsberg) Hill and the defenders posted behind the barricade of wagons and mealie-bags. This section of the wall as commanded by Sergeant Henry Gallagher, of B Company. At about 6 pm, Corporal Lyons was leaning over the barricade to aim when he was hit in the neck by a bullet which paralysed him; as his friend, Corporal Allen, bent to help him, Allen too was shot through the arm. In the foreground Corporal Attwood of the Army Service Corps distributes ammunition. The wall was abandoned shortly after and the British retired to the small are in front of the storehouse. Allen was later awarded the VC, and Attwood the DCM.  He was born at Churcham, Gloucestershire, and served for five years in the Monmouthshire Militia before joining the 24th Regiment. He served through the Kaffir War 1877-8 before his bravery at Rorkes Drift for which he was presented with the Victoria Cross by Lord Wolseley on August 3rd 1879. He later served in the 1st Volunteers Battalion Royal Fusiliers.
Wounded by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0371
Depicting Private Hook and Private Williams, B Company, 2nd Battalion, 24th Foot inside the burning hospital at Rorkes Drift, 7pm January 1879. At about 6 pm the Zulus first forced their way into the hospital building where some thirty patients were defended by a handful of able-bodied men. A running fight ensued as the patients were evacuated from room to room, a desperate struggle made all the more terrible when the Zulus set fire to the thatched roof. Here Private Alfred Henry Hook holds Zulus of the uThulwana regiment at bay whilst Private John Williams helps a patient escape; Hook received a head wound when a spear struck off his helmet.
Pinned Like Rats in a Hole by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0372
Acting Assistant Commissary J.L. Dalton commissariat and transport department and colour sergeant F. Bourne, during the battle at the front wall about 6pm at Rorkes Drift. Frank Bourne was born  on the 27th April 1854  in Balcombe Sussex, when Bourne was 18 he joined the 24th Regiment in 1872, being promoted to Corporal in 1875 and Sergeant in 1878.  Sergeant Bourne was promoted to Colour Sergeant soon after the rgeiment arrived in Natal.  Colour Sgt bourne was part of B company whose job was to guard the hospital at Rorkes Drift.  Colour Sgt Bourne played a major role in keeping the defending troops effective.  Colour Sgt Bourne was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his role in the defence, and it is surprising that he was not awarded a Victoria Cross as 11 were awarded for the defence. Col Sgt Bourne retired form the army in 1907, but  joined again for WW1, serving in Dublin.  He was the last survivor of Rorkes Drift, passing away at the age of 91 on the 8th May 1945 by coincidence being VE day.
Pot That Fellow by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0373
Baron de Donops Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo, 5.30pm, 18th June 1815.  After four hours of fighting, the squadrons of Napoleons 3rd Cavalry Corps finally join the massed assaults on the battered allied infantry squares.  With the 42 year old marechal de camp Frederic-Guillaume de Donop at their head, the 2nd and 3rd Cuirassier Regiments break from a trot into a canter as they clear the ridge.  The heavy cavalry are smashed against the steadfast bayonets of the redcoats and countercharged by light horsemen.  In one of these encounters the general himself is terribly wounded and falls from his horse. His son (aide-de-camp) is also injured.  Both are reported missing and presumed captured.  Although the generals body is not found,it is certain that he met his death in the muddy fields of Waterloo alongside many of his brigade.  In 1895 his name is inscribed on the north face of LArc de Triomphe in Paris in recognition of his service to France.
La Charge by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0454
Edward Plantagenet, Prince of Wales turns his charger once more to engage his opponent in a joust of courtesy using blunt lances.
The Joust of Peace by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0462
 Crocket is shown at the Barricades at 6am on the 5th March 1836. The siege of the Alamo ended on March 6th, when the Mexican army attacked while the Alamo defenders were sleeping.   The garrison defenders awakened,  and the final fight began.  One of the women who were gathered in the chapel witnessed Crockett  running to his post, Crockett paused briefly in the chapel to pray.  But when the Mexican soldiers breached the outer walls of the Alamo complex, most of Crocket and the defending Texians fell back to the barracks and the chapel area which had been the plan.  Davy Crockett and his men were too far from the barracks to be able to take shelter and were the last remaining defenders within the mission to be in the open. The men desperatly defended the low wall in front of the church,  using their rifles as clubs and using there knives in close combat as the Mexican troops were too close and made it impossible to reload their rifles. After a volley of fire and a charge with fixed bayonets, Mexican soldiers pushed the few remaining Texans back toward the church and soon after the Battle for the Alamo had ended after lasting 90 minutes.  It is said that the body of Crockett was surrounded by up to 12 Mexican soldiers bodies and one with Crocketts knife in him.
Crocketts Last Sunrise, at the Battle of the Alamo by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0467
Lt Gonville Bromhead stands over Private Hitch, B Co. 2/24th. Rorkes Drift, front barricade
Plugging the Gap by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0560
Crouching low behind their shields, the warriors of the uThulwans, iNdlondo and uDloko regiments advance around the foot of Shiyane hill. Led by their commander, Prince Dabulamnzi kaMpnade, the main Zulu force attacks the British outpost at Rorkes Drift, 4.50pm, 2nd January 1879.
Into the Fire by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0561
Private Robert Jones. Decorated for conspicuous bravery and devotion to the wounded at Rorkes drift. Private Robert and William Jones, posted in a room of the Hospital facing the hill, kept up a steady fire against enormous odds, and while one worked to cut a hole through the partition into the next room, the other shot Zulu after Zulu through the loophooled walls, using his own and his comrades rifle alternatively when the barrels became to hot to hold owing to the incessant firing. By their united heroic efforts six out of the seven patients were saved by being carried through the broken partition. the seventh, sergeant Maxwell being delirious, refused to be helped, and on Robert Jones returning to take him by force he found him being stabbed by the Zulus in his bed, Robert Jones died in 1898 in Peterchurch Herefordshire .  Both men were awarded the Victoria Cross.
Last Man Out by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0564
Sir John Moores epic retreat to Corunna was punctuated by desperate and often heroic rear-guard actions - none more dramatic than the cavalry clash at Benevente on the 29th December 1808. Having crossed the river Esla, cold and swollen by recent rainfall, a British picquet, comprised of elements of the Kings German Legion Hussars and the 7th, 10th and 18th Hussars, covers the river and its tactically demolished Castro Gonzalos bridge from a position near the town of Benevente. Napoleon himself leads the pursuit. The Emperors elite Guard Light Cavalry, commanded by General Lefebvre-Desnouettes, is ordered at daylight to ford the river and launch a surprise attack on what appears to be the numerically inferior British units. As five-hundred and fifty French cavalry emerge in orderly fashion from the river, intent upon quickly dispatching the opposition, they are startled to find the British piquet, reinforced by a host of British cavalry, streaming from within the confines of Benevente, some on their left flank. Under the command of Lord Paget, the British become the pursuers of the surprised French, who turn and retreat with the frigid waters of the Esla blocking their escape. Unlike their crossing in echelon just minutes before, the French now in disorder plunge into the river, where many drown. Others are captured including General Lefebvre-Desnouettes who is made prisoner by Grisdale of the 10th Hussars following a dramatic pursuit. General Lefebvre-Desnouettes will eventually escape from captivity in England, to encounter Lord Paget once again on the field of Waterloo.
Detail from Sabres on the Esla by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0565
With Fixed Bayonets soldiers of 2nd battalion Scots Guards clear enemy positions of 5th Argentine Marine Battalion on the slopes of Tumbledown
Battle for Tumbledown by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0750
Sgt. Ian John McKay VC calls for covering fire as he leads forward elements of 4 and 5 platoon of B Company 3 Para, to assault Argentinean positions held by 7th Infantry regiment, Falklands War 11th -12th June 1982.
Battle for Mount Longdon by Mark Churms (PC)Click For DetailsDHM0752
 Each postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)Postcard Set 4 (Mark Churms)Click For DetailsPSET0004
 Each postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)Postcard Set 8 (Mark Churms)Click For DetailsPSET0008
 Each postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)Postcard Set 16 (Mark Churms)Click For DetailsPSET0016

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